Command and Staff Program

ACE Track

Virtues of Magnanimous Officers

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293
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143
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Instructions:  
  1. Post a new discussion related to the topics covered in this module.  Your post needs to provide specific lessons learned with examples from this module helping you enhance your leadership capacity at work.
  2. After posting your discussion, review posts provided by other students in the class and reply to at least one of them. 
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    Jarod Primicerio

    I believe the information delivered in the discussion regarding the mindset of an officer when he/she enters the policing profession, that their heart and mind are oriented correctly. Officers enter the profession in response to a calling, to help and protect others, and to make a difference. I believe it everyone's goal to become Magnus and if asked, many believe they are there. As leaders in law enforcement, modeling the virtues, professionalism and actions expected and required of all police officers, is necessary. I find it difficult, however, when I interact with rank & file officers who don't exude the same. Nonetheless, I continue to communicate often with many of the tainted and less-productive officers, hoping to modify their actions, behaviors, morale, work-ethic, etc. I am confident many are in the same or similar situation within their agency.

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      Robert Masterson

      I would agree with you to constantly continue to communicate with those that do not show the ideal traits of a magnus. These are perhaps the ones who need connections the most. we tend to spend time with under-performers to try to get them to perform instead of looking at the core systems they lack that create the under-performing. Truly caring for everyone may lead those under performers to their true calling which just may not be in the law enforcement field.

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        Jarod Primicerio

        I agree Robert. Unfortunately, the majority of our time is dealing with the underperformers. While we consistently try to motivate them, the balancing act is to also focus on the overperformers and provide them the necessary attention. I am sure we all agree in this arena.

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      Chris Corbin

      I feel your pain and I suspect that many others do as well. I also admire your commitment to continuing forward on a virtuous path, even when faced with situations in which others appear not to share that same commitment. If you maintain a steady commitment to being MAGNUS and keep walking along a virtuous line, you will undoubtedly experience many successes and help ensure that others are able to do the same.

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      Nancy Franklin

      I agree that it is difficult interacting with fellow officers who do not share the same values and work ethic expected of a Magnus officer. It is important, as you stated, to continue to communicate with these types of employees in order to exemplify the desired behaviors and work ethic expected. As a Magnus officer it is important to understand and embody the role and responsibilities of being the positive role model and mentor so one can effectively hold others accountable.

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      Brian Lewis

      I agree, modeling the virtues, professionalism, and actions is absolutely necessary. What I've noticed in my department is there is a disconnect at the management and line-level supervisor levels. This might be a cultural thing we are dealing with. It seems we are afraid to hold people accountable these days in fear of hurting morale. But I feel morale is being hurt more by the fact there is little accountability, and what accountability there is, is not consistent.

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      Brian Johnson

      I agree with your thoughts and ideas. I would offer a perspective that has worked for me in the past. We all want to get those less productive employees to find the "why" when they came on the job. But this generally take a lot of time and energy with marginal results. I would recommend that you focus on the top 20% within your agency that thrive and want to make a difference. Help develop them into better leaders...developing other leaders is a force multiplier that will "turbocharge" your organization.

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        Lance Leblanc

        Brian, I love your reply the "why." Most leadership schools teach that but we as leader often forget it. A large percent of morale problems can be resolved with the "why."

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      Brad Butts

      I identified with a set of four magnanimous behaviors, which are action items, that can enhance communication and interaction with members of our organizations. The first action is to observe. Paying close attention to others, their concerns or performance is a good way to measure the health or efficiency of the organization and the needs of individuals. The second is to listen. Active listening, involving asking questions and providing feedback is the best way to make sure we are hearing the message or concerns clearly and it allows us a chance to show empathy or to reinforce the values of the organization. The third behavior was to learn. Continuous learning is a trait of many great leaders. Being a student of this profession, I help create a rising standard of performance and customer service through learning better ways of serving our community. The last behavior is to act. With every great plan comes action. Executing a plan for improvement, or corrective action, is how we stay ahead in this everchanging profession of public safety.

      As sworn officers we commit to exemplify the many virtuous behaviors of the law enforcement code of ethics. From the academy, throughout our careers, we strive to abide by the high expectations of character, behavior, commitment, and service. This entire module one lecture series reminded me of the many virtuous behaviors described in the code of ethics. As leaders, we need to constantly exemplify and expect our members to show these behaviors, while promoting our mission and constantly reinforcing our values so they all become how the members of the organization see itself.

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      Brad Butts

      I agree that many of us experience the same frustrations and challenges when having to manage employees who lack the many virtuous traits discussed in this module. Our best officers generally embody the larger share, but many of our personnel do not have the entire skillset when it comes to virtuous behavior. For this reason I think it so important that our written directives, and organizational goals and values address what we expect and what we stand for. As a team, many will adopt these behaviors if the message is clear and reinforced when behavior falls short. Lastly, There are a lot of parts in becoming Magnus, and I identified a few that I fall short on and will need to work on as well.

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      Frank Acuna

      Captain Primiciero,

      Thank you for sharing your perspective on Magnus virtues. I understand the frustration, when some of your personnel are negative and forget why they entered this profession. Does your agency have any methods or training that seeks to motivate these disenchanted officers?

      Frank

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        Jarod Primicerio

        Thanks Frank for the response. While there are numerous training opportunities afforded to rank and file officers, I see many shun at these options as they require additional effort. Some have tried and after receiving a rejection, they may be that negative person not understanding how to use this as an opportunity to grow.

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      Ray Bonillas

      jprimicerio,

      I can completely understand your frustrations associated with attempting to communicate with many of the tainted and less-productive officers. I also see a few of them within my organization. They are the 10 percent who do only the bare minimum and are there only as a means of collecting a paycheck. I have found that it is better to focus on the other 80 to 90 percent within the organization who are looking for that leadership and who willing to work hard to become a Magnus law enforcement officer and understands that our professionalism is also evaluated when we are out of our uniform. We must always strive to deliver results with confidence.

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      Jarvis Mayfield

      I believe that if a person is a magnus officer and he/she possess the mindset, the skills, morals, and values he/she can assist the struggling officer. The magnus officer has goals and if he/she presents his/her goal in the right fashion change can be made with another non magnus officer.

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      sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

      I have to agree with you when it comes to speaking with the rank and file who don't possess Magnus qualities. To some this is just a job and a paycheck. I give some of the Rookies credit, most come with excellent virtues and want to do the right thing, even when their course of action is not correct. That's where my responsibility as their Leader to lead them toward the right course of action comes to play. The most difficult Officers to deal with are the long term senior Deputies, I'm sure due to their experience they've adapted a complacency in duty and in writing of their reports. To their credit still all good men and women, they've just lost that "fire" i guess.

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      Justin Payer

      Jarod, I agree that most officers enter the profession with the correct mindset. I believe as a leader and and someone with the goal to be a Magnus Officer, it is our job to help the ones that do not exude the same behaviors get back on the right path.

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    Robert Masterson

    The connection aspect was the part that struck me the most. Although some may say they can work/live alone the negative aspects of isolation eventually show up. If you are unable or unwilling to connect with both those you work with and those you serve your tenure as an officer will be short.
    Command staff I remember the most from my career are those with whom I have connection. My first Lieutenant I ever worked with would manage by walking around. He knew everyone’s name and family members names. He stopped and talked about everything but work as he walked. Until the day he retired I would have done anything to make that man proud of me and worked my hardest for him.
    The caution I feel is that it can not be a “faked” connection. If it is not genuine and sincere it will be spotted as the fake, it is almost immediately. You can not set it as a mission it really must be genuine for the connection to work, otherwise it just you are trying a “technique” and no true connections results.

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    Chris Corbin

    My biggest takeaway from this module is that we must act on the belief that every individual has it in them to be better, whether it is outwardly apparent or not. With that in mind, it is imperative that we, as leaders at work, at home and in our communities, seek to support others as they navigate their personal path to bettering themselves. This will require that we see others for what they can become, not just for what they are today. Furthermore, we must demonstrate that a commitment to growth through small, steady steps forward matched with an unwavering commitment to the cardinal virtues of justice, courage, wisdom, and temperance, will ultimately lead to magnanimity. By adopting this personal commitment and sharing details about my path with my co-workers and family, I expect to grow personally, and more importantly, help others to realize their full potential.

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    Nancy Franklin

    After viewing the lecture I had a better understanding of not only what it means to be a Magnus officer, but learned more about what the virtues of a Magnus officer mean. It was interesting to note that individuals coming into the law enforcement profession share such similar motives of answering a calling to serve and be a part of something bigger than themselves. What sets Magnus officers apart from others is that continued drive for self-improvement both personally and professionally. It is easy once you are in the law enforcement profession to get caught up in the "rat race" and tire from the trials and tribulations officers face daily with the negative public sentiment toward our profession and the internal politics that exist in any profession. What is more difficult is what makes officers Magnus. It takes commitment and perseverance to overcome the exposure to such negativity and continuously look for the light in the dark that allows us to grow and improve. Self-awareness is crucial to becoming Magnus, as it is this self-awareness that allows us to understand who we are and set expectations for ourselves and others. As explained in the lecture, it is important to create and believe in a shared vision, be goal-oriented, inspire and mentor others, and be that catalyst for change through our actions.

    Some of the things that resonated with me the most in this lecture was the mindset of look, listen, learn and do. This mindset was reinforced with the Magnus behaviors discussed which were to OBSERVE in order to perceive what is really going on; to LISTEN carefully to what people really say (active listening skills); to have a commitment to LEARN continuously, as knowledge is very powerful and is a force multiplier; and lastly to ACT by having a commitment no matter how small, to do something to improve either self or for the benefit of others. I do believe that becoming Magnus is a journey, as stated in the lecture, because we never stop learning and are constantly faced with new challenges...being a Magnus officer is key to overcoming the challenges constantly thrown our way.

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    Kyle Turner

    Development as a magnus officer is ongoing throughout one's career and even life. The virtues of a magnus officer are ones that we must all strive for but rarely, if ever, fully achieve. Having this mindset, that we must constantly be striving toward this goal, is important as it ensures we are aware of our shortcomings which will hopefully prevent us from falling into the trap of over confidence or indulging in our human tendencies. We see people in our career who choose to advance or promote for various selfish reasons (power, influence, money, etc.) but end up failing to promote further or lose their career through an embarrassing incident or lapse in judgement because their intentions were not right from the start. We all have a tendency to have occasional lapses in judgement, but it would seem to me that those who are not magnus oriented, or have no intention to work towards magnus, tend to have issues of malfeasance vs. those who mean well but still make mistakes (misfeasance). By guiding our employees, and ourselves, towards magnus behavior and characteristics, and continuously reminding ourselves of our intent to work toward magnus, we set the very foundation of our career up for long-term success (not always promotion - but positive reputation, work ethic, community service, etc).

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      Colby Stewart

      I agree development as magnus officer is something we must continue thought out our career and personal life. As leaders in our department we must lead by example to our subordinates and other leaders in our department. By living by the Magnus standards we can help lead our department into the future and help to mold the next generation of officers into the right path.

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        Jarvis Mayfield

        Yes as a Magnus officer the total goal is the educate all officers. I truly believe that some of the mishaps that a young officer encounter are because they have a different mindset. It is imperative that a Magnus officer educate these officers as well as the citizens in the community so we all strive toward success.

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    Brian Lewis

    I believe everyone would agree, when entering the law enforcement profession, you feel you are Magnus in both body and mind. Your body has been conditioned with physical training at the academy, and your mind has been filled with visions of a noble, rewarding profession. I had this perceived notion that all LEOs were magnanimous. Because of this, I entered my career with the highest of expectations for myself and my co-workers, only to be dejected when I saw veteran officers giving minimum effort in their work product, physical appearance, and ethics. When I vented my frustration to my sergeant, he told me, "Brian, you hold yourself to very high standards. You can't expect everyone to meet your standards." I found out quickly when I promoted that trying to raise everyone to my standards caused resistance. However, when they saw that I wasn't going to lower my standards to accommodate them, many officers left my team at shift change and went to supervisors with lower standards. The officers that stayed, and the ones who bid for my team, were all looking for structure, accountability, and higher standards. I eventually ended up with a productive, positive team that required little hands on supervision. I've been lucky to have these caliber of officers and supervisors follow me throughout my career in supervision and management. I feel had I not continued to strive for Magnus, I might have been liked by more, but not respected.

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    Brian Johnson

    This section of study was timely for me since I sit down with every new employee to discuss the mission, vision and values of our department. What it means to be a servant leader and how we hold each other accountable as law enforcement professionals. Admittedly, I do most of the talking because I am trying to instill the MAGNUS Officer and what it means to be MAGNUS! We talk about the 30 Virtues of a MAGNUS Officer with the understand that we will never accomplish complete mastery of all the virtues, but we must continue on the idea of being a life-long learn of leadership, which will develop your character and make you a role model for your family, friends, peer and community. Moreover, the understanding of self-development is accomplished through taking action steps to further your education, learning and understanding of yourself. The first person you lead is yourself!

    The foundation of a thriving organization starts with a true and honest willingness to understand our strengths and weaknesses so we can take action to change. As law enforcement professionals, we must constantly remind each other that our noble profession is only as good as our men and women whom act like honest servants to our community.

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    Frank Acuna

    Hello class,

    The discussion regarding the definition of Magnus and the virtues of Magnanimous Officers is a good topic for leaders in an organization. Many of the virtues discussed regarding Magnanimous Officers fall directly in line with the Chino Police Department's 7 Core Values, Honesty, Integrity, Accountability, Dedication, Professionalism, Respect and Teamwork. Recently, our newly appointed Chief of Police set up meetings with each member of our department and asked them the same three questions. One question was "What called you to serve in Law Enforcement?" This is a great question to ask and one that will allow the leader to understand the motivations of their staff. This question, though, demonstrates the Magnus qualities many of our staff possess. In speaking with our Chief, he noted many were called to serve others, be guardians and to make an impact on the lives of others. This was true for both tenured and newly hired staff, both sworn and non-sworn. I personally believe every leader has Magnus virtues in them, sometimes they just have to remember what called them to service in the first place.

    Frank

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    Ray Bonillas

    Class listening to the lecture about the Virtues of a Magnus Officer takes me back to the day I took an oath to defend the Constitution of this great Country and the State of California over thirty years ago. These virtues define what we attempt to achieve every day twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. We are expected to be held to a higher standard which I welcome. What I have learned from this lecture is that by adhering to these virtues anyone can achieve success in leadership and provides a path to model the way for future leaders at all levels of the organization. It brings it back to the duty and honor we all must have to serve our communities.

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    Henry Dominguez

    The concept of the Magnus officer is very important in any organization, especially in law enforcement. I, in fact, try to instill those virtues to all of our officers. With that being said, what a Magnus officer was when I started my professional career, is quite different then what a Magnus officer is today. I feel the new generation of officers, at least at our police department, feel they are Magnus; however, they really don't know what that means. Or at least they only hold true to part of the definition. Words like self serving, entitlement, and average come to mind when thinking of our new generation and their idea of Magnus Officer. I understand that it is my job to teach them what the true meaning of Magnus is and enjoy doing it. However, it seems that as the generations get younger and younger (or I get older and older), their virtues completely change and the term Magnus evolves or morphs. Has anyone else dealt with or seen this problem?

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      Magda Fernandez

      I believe all generations including ours are all different, our officers come from different backgrounds, cultures times, etc. I guess I have learned that in my career, I can’t make everyone be like me when I was a new officer. I must hold them to the department’s standards of performance and not mine, which admittedly was a struggle. I really had to break it down and understand where they were coming from (which was very hard for me and it took a while) Once I somewhat figured it out, at least with the people I was dealing with, I determined I was originally doing it all wrong. Like some one else said in a post, it was about the relationships that we build that help us understand and relate to people. We then can empower them to do things which will motivate them to do work with expectations laid in front of them. When they feel like they are part of it or have ownership things changed. I recognize this may not work for everyone. I don’t believe virtues morph; I believe we become undisciplined to them and find the path of least resistance.

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      Drauzin Kinler

      Henry, I would totally agree with every portion of your statement. I would say that everyone in this training has seen and is dealing with the same issues. I have for many years tried to instill these traits into the officers that I worked along side of and those that I have supervised. I have been fortunate to instill these values in my children, but find it very difficult to instill them in many of the new generation officers.

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      tolivier@lafayettela.gov

      I know exactly what you are expressing. I have had the same feelings. I have been a police officer for 26 years now and lately I have been reflecting on when I came on, wondering if the senior officers felt the same way about me. In my experience with younger officers I find they are a bit more educated and so they ask way more questions than I did in reference to procedures. I began having discussions with them on why the procedures and SOPs are the way they are. These discussions opened both our eyes, they began to understand what we were trying to achieve and for me when policies should be revisited and revised. Just my experience.

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      Dan Wolff

      Henry,
      Great point on yesterday’s officer vs. today’s officer. I understand what you are saying about instilling the virtues of the Magnus officer today seems a little more difficult. The new generation coming in to this career sometimes comes out of the training academy feeling entitled but not yet understanding what is totally expected of them. That’s why I feel it’s our job to instill these virtues into these officers just as you said. Take the time and LISTEN and get to know your people. Start setting a foundation for them to build on and I truly believe it starts with INTEGRITY. After all, is it not our job to train our replacement?

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      Christopher Savoie

      I have also noticed a decline in virtue in some aspects of the younger officers. I feel magnus cannot evolve. The virtues required to live magnus have been the same from our ancestors, to now. I feel the new generations of officers suffer from failures of society and parenting. They have been told all their young life that they cannot lose, and are always right, that there is no wrong way of doing something. In my opinion, this leads the young officer to step into the job ill prepared to cope with the stress and expectations that are required to be magnanimous. With that being said, I feel that every generation complains about the next generation, and we as leaders must make sure we are not falling into the same mindset. I believe it is our job as leaders of our departments to find ways to assimilate the new officers into the “Magnus Way.”

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    Magda Fernandez

    In reading and learning about the virtues of a magnanimous officer, I learned more about me, where I stand and was a reminder of where I really need to be. In today’s world of staffing issues, budget constraints and challenges facing police departments, it may be easy to lose sight of where we are vs. where we really need to be. In many if not most organizations, it is easy to be inundated with projects, personnel issues, and day to day “emergencies” or fires that must be extinguished. It is very easy to become frustrated with these issues and deflect or take short cuts when dealing with them, thus losing sight of our own virtues. It reminded me of the discipline and accountability I have to myself, the members of my department and my organization. It’s a constant discipline and accountability we must have on ourselves to better serve and improve ourselves as human beings to accomplish the goal being MAGNUS officers and leaders.

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      Colby Stewart

      After reviewing the lecture in this module, I reflected on my own values of being a good officer and supervisor and what I have seen over the years with coworkers habits. I believe that becoming a magus officer is something that can not be taught with out the officer having the values in stilled in him prior to becoming a officer. A person can act as if they are a truly honest person when they know people are observing their work habits, but the times when they know their is no one around they will revert back to their natural instincts of being a less-than-honest person.

      A person with integrity will always act the same at all times, A person that claims to have integrity will only do the right thing when their is someone watching them. I believe that Integrity is something that cannot be taught. Integrity is something that a person is born with and carries it with them throughout their lives.

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        Laurie Mecum

        You are correct. A person can totally be different in front of people versus when no one is around. That is not a Magnus. Its sad, however, there are those people walking around with us in everyday life.

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        Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

        I agree: honesty, humility and integrity are instilled in a person as they are growing into adulthood. Those virtues cannot be taught.

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    Drauzin Kinler

    Upon the completion of this lecture, I would agree that you must have all of the traits as described to be successful. I have been in law enforcement for 31 years and have witnessed those that have these traits and those who did not in leadership roles. The leaders with these traits always succeeded with completing the goals they wanted to accomplish. The leaders without these traits would usually have a unit that lacked in moral, production and in many cases would have officers with poor attitudes that would eventually affected the few officers that did have these traits.

    As a Commander within my agency, I have dealt with many different personalities. It is unfortunate that I have seen many officers come and go over the years because they did not represent many of these traits. As it was mentioned in one of the other post, I do not believe this is something you can teach a person. Either you have these traits or you do not. Today's police officer is different in so many way from when I became a police officer. I truly became a police officer because it was my passion to want to make a difference and to help those in need. I never had the mindset of what was in it for me, as many of the younger generation police officers have today.

    I am looking forward to progressing my ability to become a better leader and being able to address the issues that we are all facing today with the current generation of police officers.

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      Mike Brown

      I agree that the times are different now then when I first started back in 1992. I listened and learned from different individuals all of whom had different ideas of how to make things run smoothly. What I really learned was it wasn't their techniques but it was there personality. Some had what it took and others just wanted to do their 12 hours and go home.

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      Royce Starring

      I too have witnessed some leaders who lacked these traits and you are right their squad were never motivated.

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    tolivier@lafayettela.gov

    The Magnus police officer as discussed in the first portion of this class is the ideal police officer, virtuous, kind, constantly seeking knowledge, fair etc. If one wants to become an effective leader one must first strive to posses these qualities by working on their own flaws trying to become their personal best and attain the qualities mentioned.

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      Monte Potier

      I agree that self reflection is one of the most important parts of being an effective leader. We all have to put ego aside when you are trying to improve yourself.

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      Judith Estorge

      I agree the qualities of a magnus police officer, strived at on a continual basis, will make us effective leaders. The difficulty comes in the daily process of being disciplined.

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    Monte Potier

    I believe that the hardest part of becoming a Magmus Officer is the art of listening. As we get in the profession for an extended period we feel that we have seen everything, therefore we tend to disregard the information we receive from the younger officers. Listening to new ideas may improve our own mindset.

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      Jason Porter

      Listening to someone with less time and experience is a huge hurdle for most of us to overcome. We don't want to think that someone with one year on the job could tell us something we don't already know. Having an open door that welcomes new ideas is a wonderful way to allow your officers the chance to contribute to the whole. As with any new officer, if they feel they have contributed to the greater good it will keep moral high and an open line of communication.

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      dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

      I would have to agree that a vast majority of officers in a supervisory role often don't listen, but hear, just to respond. Listening is an art that has to be practiced to be effective. Despite how we may feel, some of the younger officers propose good ideas and can really help us on our journey to become more effective leaders and policing agencies.

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      That is spot-on Monte.

      I often tell my Deputies to listen to comprehend not listen to reply. Sadly, I am also guilty of listening to reply to what a less experienced deputy is telling me. Since I "know more that you", the whole time the other person is speaking, I'm making mental notes on how to counter what they are saying. What I should be doing is actively listening to what is being said and trying to comprehend the message BEFORE I reply. When I listen to comprehend, I find that I'm more willing to consider a new mindset, technique, and/or idea.

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    Jason Porter

    As others have related to, the lesson describes the perfect officer. We all want to be that person and it is true that most of us believe that we are that person. That is probably false for most of us. Learning our flaws is the most awakening aspect of these lessons. Being a good leader requires constant work on our part to be someone that one can look up to for guidance, direction, and knowledge to further their careers. It is much easier to be just the opposite of the Magnus Officer. Doing the right thing when no one is looking is something that I have tried to instill in my daughter and step-children. You have to have integrity and respect for others.

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      Mike Brown

      I agree that we all want to be that person that is described in the lesson. But being a realistic person we all have flaws but we still strive to be the best that we can. You are correct in saying that when others are looking we do the right thing or say what is appropriate at the time but its really true and just when we say and do it when one one is around.

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      Samuel Lucia

      jporter I enjoyed reading that the leadership principles you learn at work, you try to apply at home. Leadership starts at home.

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    Judith Estorge

    I like that the Magnus Officer is on a journey throughout their career. There is always much to learn and areas to grow. It is easy to know the right thing to do but not always easy to live it. It is also important to maintain a healthy lifestyle through continuous work on the body, mind and soul. I agree that listening is one of the hardest elements in being a good, effective leader.

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      Joey Prevost

      In agreement Lt., we have to bring it all together as a whole package in order to be effective. If we lack in one area, the others suffer. Health, professional life, personal life.

      ujp

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      Nicole Oakes

      Lt. Estorge, I agree with your post and like the idea that you bring fourth in a, "Journey throughout their career." I believe that many of us are looking at the finish line instead of concentrating on the impact that we have in the here and now. This can make a big difference on how less senior officers perceive who we are and the message we are delivering.

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    Mike Brown

    It appears that what we are listening to and what is being shown is a refresher of what we should have been doing since becoming law enforcement officer. This model called magnus, has been taught to me since being a member of the US Army. All the key points of being truthful, being honest, being a true leader in good time and bad times is what makes this job so awesome.

    An effective leader leads by example and in my opinion it doesn't really matter if anyone likes or dislikes you as long and you are fair and impartial when it comes to doing and saying what is right.

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      Samuel Lucia

      mbrown great point. Magnus behavior didn't just become important at this stage in our careers; its always been important.

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      Lance Leblanc

      I would agree that this should be a refresher because as a law enforcement officers we should already have these virtues. I believe that is how most of us start out in law enforcement, but for some that often changes due to greed or a want for power. You are a hundred percent right, t you should always lead by example not by words alone.

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    Royce Starring

    The Magnanimous Officer must serve and protect with character. He needs to be action oriented even though risky it is the right thing to do. I also agree the magnanimous officer should constantly thrive to improve his character and virtue.

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      The replies to these open discussions leave us all time to self-reflect. As Royce stated here, that the "Magnanimous Officer" should possess character and virtue. These traits are some of the "core" values that are discussed frequently. It is certain that that if we don't strive to succeed, we are doomed to fail. It is fair to say that people who have "sight", sometimes fail to have "vision". To me, this means that they fail to better others or themselves, even if they are given the opportunity to do so. As such, the ability to "see", but failure to "visualize" the final outcome escapes the best of us. We can only strive to take what these courses offer and use the "sight" and "vision" which we all hope to possess and offer as future officers/leaders.

      Mike Shard

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        Sergeant James Schueller

        Your comment on 'It is fair to say that people who have "sight", sometimes fail to have "vision" ' sums up so much of what I think this section (and I anticipate, this whole course) will shed light on. It is one thing to take in information and understand, it is a whole other thing to take that, look inside yourself to improve, and then take action for yourself and your organization- and the profession of Policing. The vision part to me means what you (I) do with this knowledge, and how we "Pay it forward" so that the next generation can do the same. The profession needs to constantly change, adapt, and improve.

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    Samuel Lucia

    The emphasis throughout this entire module was Magnanimity. It was also the first module, which underscores its importance. In the law enforcement profession, ethical decision making, or being the Magnus Officer, is paramount. Every law enforcement action results in an outcome, and every action is preceded by a decision. If the decision is based on virtuous thinking, the better the outcome. As mentioned in the module, there’s more to policing than confronting crime, and demanding Magnus behavior in your organization is good leadership.

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      Chasity Arwood

      I agree, there is much more to policing than confronting crime. Good leadership helps builds trust in the organization and the community.

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    Dan Wolff

    As I listened to the virtues of a Magnanimous Officer lecture I reflected upon myself and others I have come in contact with during my military and law enforcement career. I thought about the great supervisors I worked with and the not so good supervisors. Those that were great supervisors/leaders had a persona that matched the virtues of a Magnanimous Officer. Each one was different in their own way and I can’t say they all had every virtue listed. However, they all shared the same common core values starting with integrity and excellence in all we do. That was a foundation to build upon and try to instill in subordinates. After all, if you start with a great foundation the rest should be easier to add right?

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    Lance Leblanc

    As I watched the lecture on what it takes to be a Magnus Officer, I would expect most officers would fit in that category. The lecture addressed listening. I think we as leaders often fail to listen to subordinates and sometime take an us against them attitude. This is a disconnect that often leads to poor morale. Officers like to know they are being listened to and that they are framing the future of the department.

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      David Cupit

      I have been guilty myself of not listening and sometimes shutting down the conversation. I have learned to recognize my mistake and have immediately apologized with great results.

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    Joey Prevost

    Many things struck me as I went through the readings and lecture of this first Module. The very idea of "Magnus", at it's very core should be what we as human beings abide by. We should start and end each day with self reflection and an honest assessment of where improvement is needed. As the lesson indicates, we never stop learning and are constantly evolving as humans. "The journey never ends". In order for our professional life to be at its best output, our personal life needs to be squared away as well. One cannot be without the other.

    The assigned readings teach us that we must learn to balance the expectations of the organization and the needs of the individual members for the most efficient output. There is no "cookie cutter" template to show how to properly manage the behavior of each individual, each must be learned. Individuals are molded by various influences such as upbringing, belief system, past experiences and all influence perception. If the meaning we are trying to convey is not clear, we as humans fill in the blanks based on our previous experiences.

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    David Cupit

    I have tried throughout my career to hold to the characteristics described in this lecture. I have never heard of the Magnanimous
    Officer. I have learned that sometimes it is difficult to live to the high standards set forth here but not impossible.

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      Corinn Pickett

      I have not heard of Magnanimous Officer either. However, all of the qualities set forth in the lecture are those I have heard over and over again in leadership, supervisor, and management training. They are extremely high, this is probably because they are what the public expects. The public holds us to such a high standard that if we do not there will be an impossible imbalance. We may fall short at times of such expectations but the important aspect of this lecture was to acknowledge their existence and strive for excellence.

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    Chasity Arwood

    In listening to the fist lecture, I would agree that most officers strive to be "Magnus". Over time, leaders can get complacent , which causes a disconnect between supervisors and their subordinates. I believe a good way to combat this would be self-reflection. As the lecture stated, one goal of the "Magnus" officer should be to continuously improve and learn.

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      Clint Patterson

      I like how you used the word disconnect because I can't agree more with that word. We have all worked around or possibly been that "disconnected part" due to complacency. I would love to see an evaluation process that allows subordinates to evaluates their supervisors. I believe this would also help with self-reflection.

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      David Azemar

      Your right, the term "forgot where they came from" comes to mind. Even in our line of work certain calls get monotonous. Dealing with the same people with the same problems time after time causes us to just go through the motions. As leaders we must be on guard for complacency to combat it.

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    Christopher Savoie

    In an ever-evolving world, the law enforcement officer must also evolve. What I took from this module is that the Magnanimous Officer is not exempt from the evolution. The key is that the Magnanimous Officer must do this without compromising his virtues and principles. A new officer coming into this career, has to understand that many procedures and policies have changed, but the virtues and principles of the past have to be upheld and continued.

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    Corinn Pickett

    This lecture provided an overall definition of Magnanimous Officers. The lecture broke down Magnanimous Officers into sections consisting of the Magnus Way, Magnus Beliefs, and Magnus Behaviors. The Magnus Way encompasses the embodiment of such virtues as honor, integrity, and responsibility. Magnus Beliefs are goal oriented with high standards set for themselves and others, as well as action oriented by providing positive direction through mentoring and modeling. There are four Magnus Behaviors indicated in the lecture as observe, listen, learn, and act. 

    These definitions are not foreign or new to this profession.  These are all reiterations of expectations our profession has handed down from our career infancy. When interviewing for a police cadet position there are honor and integrity questions. When going through the academy the Way, Beliefs, and Behaviors are drilled into your mind over and over. 

    Somewhere along the way these Magnus qualities are pushed to the back of the mind like an old textbook in a bookcase. This lecture brings the book out and dusts it off. It tells us to keep it out on the desk to refer to continuously throughout out lives. We need to carry these virtues and definitions of the embodiment of our profession with us always and refer to it in whatever we do regardless of whether we are on or off duty.   

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    Nicole Oakes

    According to the lecture the definition of a Magnus Officer is one who continuously improves in the characteristics of virtue by learning to be increasingly fair, strong, wise and prudent, by improving thinking, speaking, actions and deeds through the gradual process of improving character in every situation, both professional and personal.

    I agree with the end of the lecture where most police officers enter this line of work looking to make a difference, serve others and protect the vulnerable. I gathered from this lecture that it takes someone with the mindset of looking, listeining, learning, and doing what is correct and virtuous to attain the status of Magnus. I believe that we have those people here at the Police Department (Both of higher and lower rank,) and I have been mentored by some of them. I know from experience that I draw on the memory of what those officers did, and how they did it. Their example has helped me in decision making in my own law enforcement career. This is only one of the ways in which we can use a Magnus Officer to help the evolution of policing by helping to develop problem solving skills.

    One of the things that stuck with me is the fact that a Magnus Officer is a warrior with a guardian heart. I have always viewed our professionin this way. We fight the good fight with good hearts.

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    cmeidl@spokanepolice.org

    I am a Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPC) evaluator and am testing the system.

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    Laurie Mecum

    One of the things I learned in this module is officers with MAGNUS qualities tend to be better officers simply because they want to do the right thing all the time. Its qualities that everyone should have no matter what profession you are in honestly. Most become officers because they feel the calling to the profession, which can make someone a better officer rather than someone just looking for a job. In trying to recruit people to work for our agency, I can see that people just looking for a job most times do not last in this profession because they do not possess the MAGNUS qualities. Today’s generation, I believe, see’s things very differently than previous generations. They are more entitled, self –absorbed, and want everything quickly. We have a lot of work to do to help them be better leaders.

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      Christian Johnson

      Absolutely, Laurie.

      It takes a substantial, continuous effort to get someone out of the 'just a job' mindset and into taking pride in serving their community. I have had a number of successes in dealing with new personnel like that, but I have had some failures as well.

      I'm looking forward to learning new ways to help with it.

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    Clint Patterson

    Upon completion of Virtues of Magnanimous Officers, I feel the Magnus Rewards is crucial to becoming a Magnus officer. I learned that if any officer in a police department doesn’t have the ambition to meet the rewards that his other fellow officers share, then he becomes stagnant. The Magnus officer must want to make a difference in the community that he serves. The officer must provide serves to the public, whether it’s in the hardest times or better times of those affected. This officer must be willing to help others, that most people would not help. But most of all, Magnus officers must swear to protect. In doing these duties that we all do, I feel this builds the “Guardian Heart of Magnus.” I know officers that have been in law enforcement for many years who seem to only “ride the clock” because they have lost the visions of the rewards and the heart of a guardian. These officers do possess the traits to be great but may need more practice to become stronger. Therefore, I know I want to leave a legacy behind and engrave the same virtues I strive for every day at work into the heart of our future Magnus officers. I feel the Magnus officer begins on day one at the police academy, where it’s become our duty to help initiate these steps. Does anyone else feel the same or experienced this before?

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      mmcnab@spokanepolice.org

      Clint,
      I believe the vast majority of us start out with the fundamental virtues of a Magnus Officer. As you know some officers lose this over the years and often succumb to the mindset of "us against them" or worse "me against them" and "them" being criminals , the public, the administration, etc. I have found myself in this spot once in my career but took the advice of a mentor and became more involved in broadening my career (teaching, specialties) and professional development (getting my degree). By doing more than just my shift I was a able to reinvigorate my passion to serve and it allowed me to reinvent my career in law enforcement. I believe we can help those who get off track the same way we help the public and that is by showing compassion and modeling the way.

      I enjoyed reading your post.

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      David Ehrmann

      I agree that the MAGNUS reward is crucial to becoming a MAGNUS officer. It can be seen that officers tend to lose sight of the reason they got into our profession. It turns from a “want to serve” to a “what serves me” attitude. This does not happen to all, but happens for some. These officers need to be reminded of what our profession is about, a duty to serve. They need to be shown that truthfulness, integrity, honor, nobility, humility and all those qualities that are the MAGNUS way will help them become a MAGNUS officer and thus better their career. They need to be shown that being a MAGNUS officer and focusing on the MAGNUS reward will help them enhance their career as opposed to only thinking about themselves or what they are getting in return. As officers who are trying to better ourselves in becoming better MAGNUS officers, we know that actions are noticed by senior leaders. This is why we are in the position we are in today. It is incumbent upon us as MAGNUS officers to help guide these new officers in the right direction.

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      Christian Johnson

      I agree completely, Clint. If you are not in this career to make a difference and serve, then you are in the wrong career.

      I'm sure we all know people like that, but I truly can't imagine dealing with the things we do for a paycheck alone. If you took away the satisfaction I get from serving this community, I'd be doing something else entirely.

      I believe people in that mindset can be helped, but it will take consistent effort.

      The same can be said of our new hires. Most are coming to us as their first 'real' job. Some join to serve, some join for the stability, some join for the retirement plan ha-ha. As I said before with the disillusioned officer, these new members of our agency need constant help to stay the course and strive to improve. I have done my best to form a team of people to surround them with that have bought into the mindset of service and foster the idea that we are family.

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    mmcnab@spokanepolice.org

    “I am a Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPAC) evaluator and am testing the system”

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    David Ehrmann

    Upon completion on this module (Virtues of Magnanimous Officers), I found the qualities of a MAGNUS officer are often found in law enforcement professionals entering our profession. However, those qualities tend to get lost over time. This does not occur for the majority, but does occur far too often. For example, many times I see the eager, new officer enter the profession with a MAGNUS mindset. They have honor, integrity, respect and prudence. All those traits that are the MAGNUS way. However, over time, those traits begin to be pushed aside resulting in a belief for personal reward rather than a MAGNUS reward.

    In my humble opinion, it’s my belief this mindset is caused by a failure in leadership at one level or another. It is incumbent upon us, as upper level leaders, to demonstrate those MAGNUS values to our younger officers. Not only in our words, but in our actions. This will help develop those young officers into becoming strong, MAGNUS leaders in the future. It will also bolster a sense of pride, respect and professionalism that will extend not only to other members of the agency, but will be seen by the citizens we serve resulting in a greater bond between an agency and the public.

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      Christian Johnson

      Well said, Dave.

      It is absolutely up to us to lead by example and foster the correct virtues for them.

      As we learned in this module, you aren't born MAGNUS. You work for it, achieve it, and continue working for it.

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    Christian Johnson

    I began this module thinking highly of myself. I am proud of the man I am, as are my wife and daughters. I am honest, hard-working and take great pride in serving my community. I strive to learn all I can and passionately pass my knowledge on to others. I strive to be judicious and fair at all times. I am family-oriented and have gotten my personnel to grow into a second family for myself and each other. I appreciate everything I have in life and feel blessed every day, personally and professionally. Helping others reach their goals gives me an enormous sense of accomplishment. I take great pride in being fair and compassionate with everyone, whether it is a Deputy, citizen of our parish or an offender at our Correctional Center. As I was going through the module and learning more about being a magnanimous man and officer, I thought to myself, “I’m already Magnus! Bring on the rest of the videos!”

    Well, that premature thought was less than seven minutes into the module. I quickly learned that there were dents in the armor I had so proudly put on as I silently declared myself a success. I swear like a sailor, but I was in the Navy, so that is acceptable, right? I am much more judgmental than I care to admit. I mentally correct and chastise myself immediately after thinking it, but that doesn’t undo the fact that I thought it. I am overweight, out of shape and I smoke. I let emotion control the words coming out of my mouth before my brain has had the opportunity to stop them. When I get frustrated by what someone has to say, usually because I disagree with what is being said, I stop actively listening. I have off days. They are rare, but there are days that I do not strive to be the best I can and just do what needs doing.

    After taking an honest, good look at myself, I discovered gaping holes in that armor I put on at the beginning of the module. I have a list of things that I need to work on going forward in my quest to become Magnus.

    I have a plan and it is time to get down to work.

    How did your self-assessment go?

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    Roanne Sampson

    I learned valuable lessons about leadership. I learned the characteristics of being a magnus officer. No one should do this for promotional purposes or to gain anything from it. Leadership is an ongoing process. The characteristics of a magnus officer must always be displayed. Many in law enforcement possess these traits, but some are a work in progress. Early in my career, I found some very great leaders and a few who influenced younger officers in a negative way. Have you ever worked for a leader who was negative about everything? I don't believe they knew how their attitude effected the newer officers. I believe all of these leaders have left the agency. Leadership training is a great reminder of where officers need to be and what they need to be doing daily.

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      Amanda Pertuis

      Well said Roanne. My belief is that it is up to current leaders to erase the negative mindset and create positive employees.

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    Amanda Pertuis

    This module showed me the Magnus Way: Truthfulness, Integrity, Honor, Nobility, Humility, Faithfulness, Respect, Responsibility, Prudence and Gratitude. These qualities not only help you to be a better officer, but also a better leader. How can you expect coworkers and subordinates to have these qualities if you do not? Simple, it starts with me! I need to live by the Magnus Way and show them how it is done.

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      Rocco Dominic, III

      Agreed, Amada Pertuis. If we as leaders do not practice the Magnus Way ourselves, how can we expect our subordinates and coworkers to be truthful or respectful to others. As leaders we have to make sure we are instilling these virtues into their training and their daily work schedule. Then we will have successfully achieved the Virtues of Magnanimous Officer.

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    Rocco Dominic, III

    While reading the Module Overview, I thought to myself; I have the virtues required to be a Magnanimous Officer. I pride myself on being truthful, respectful, and I act with integrity. As I watched the modules it opened my eyes, maybe I am not as virtuous as I thought. What I mean is, how many times as a leader have I/We turned a blind eye to a subordinate or peer who may have said something negative to diminish the morale of others. As a MAGNUS Officer, I should have been able to recognize this and corrected the actions immediately.

    After reviewing the module, I have a lot more to learn about becoming a MAGNUS Officer.

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    David Azemar

    The list of qualities possessed by a Magnus officer is long and impressive. I would hope I possess these traits, even though they may not always be apparent in my interactions with the public and coworkers. The realities of life outside work and the changing perceptions and opinions of police officers can wear you down over time, causing burnout. It takes strong self discipline and determination to perform to the high standards of a Magnus officer routinely. Honest introspection of who you are, requires courage and humility. It is an ongoing process throughout your career and life. This module certainly made me think of how I can improve myself and by extension be a leader to others.

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      Donnie

      I concur. I like to think that I too possess all these traits. It's hard to tell but a really good teacher is your conscious. It doesn't work for everyone but if you have one it will tell you the truth.

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    wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

    As a Magnus officer I have to lead by example. How can expect my coworkers and subordinates to have this mind set and qualities if I do not. As a leader it starts with me, from the appearance of my uniform, to giving full effort on the simple calls as you will give towards the major calls.

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      Lance Landry

      I agree with every part of your comment. Good leaders lead from the front. Subordinates are extremely perceptive so the subconscious cues such as the condition of your uniform, the condition of your unit, how you speak to complainants, every thing we do day to day as a law enforcement professional is being watched. They see you do things a certain way or say things a certain way they are most surely going to mimic how you handled it.

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        wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

        The public and our subordinates watches everything we do. I stress and stress to my deputies all the time make sure you handle yourself in a professional manner at all times, because you never know who's watching.

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      anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

      I agree if we start by doing the small things the correct way, it will be a whole lot easier and a lot less mistakes for bigger issues. Leading by example, is one of the main issue that occurs in organizations.

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    Lance Landry

    What I gathered from the Virtues of the Magnanimous Officer lecture is taking on the responsibilities of those that have preceded us in the noble profession of law enforcement is not a task to be taken lightly. Being “magnus” as Aristotle defined is being great. A leader to embody true professionalism is one that is truthful, has integrity and honor, is noble and humble, content with their position, faithful to the organization, respectful, prudent, and grateful. A magnus officer understands who they are, shares their vision, is goal oriented, embodies high ideals and follows a strict standard of conduct. I was somewhat relieved to recognize some of these traits which I have learned through years of public service in myself. Some of those traits were based on my own philosophy of treating others how I would like myself or my family to be treated by a law enforcement officer. I also recognized some traits where I could use improvement.

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      The awareness of those who preceded us is important. I agree that we can see many of these traits in ourselves. I also feel that when we identify those traits in us we can also identify a mentor from this profession who represents that trait and serves as our model or measuring stick for that virtue.

      We can always use improvement. I feel that the insights that will be revealed by this course will serve us both to become better leaders.

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    Donnie

    Honestly, when I first became a law enforcement officer back in 1998 I thought it was cool to be able to carry a gun. All the while not really understanding my second amendment rights and that I didn’t need to be an officer to do that. But at the time, I really needed a job having just finished college and my wife was already involved in law enforcement. So I got a job and fell in love with it. I soon began to realize the power that was bestowed upon me. As I worked every day I learned more and more. As I learned, I began to humble myself. When I would see the effect of something I did upon someone I began to structure and change my work ethic. Not that I was unethical, it was basically ‘on the job training’ development. I learned that it’s not always important to issue a citation or summons. I learned discretion carried a lot of value, as did honesty, integrity, and respect. I began (and still do) to hold myself accountable for the actions I took at work. I would treat people the way I wanted to be treated until other action was required. Law enforcement is constantly training your mind, heart, and body. It’s a never ending self-development and improvement challenge. I hope that I have come a long way. Because I still have a ‘ways’ to go. This is what ‘Magnus’ is to me.

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      Lieutenant John Champagne

      As a rookie you do not understand the great authority that has been given to you. Through experience we understand Officers discretion and how it can impact a person's life. We are all a work in progress and I look forward to completing this course and becoming a better husband, father and leader.

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        Lt. I can not agree with you more on this post. In the academy, we not taught what it means to be a police officer. Yes, we get the lip service from the ethics class that we all had to take; however, it was never really expanded into this much detail. I remember in the early part of my career, in the early 2000s, we were tossed a set of keys and told to hit the road. FTO and the program of FTO were not nearly what it is today.

        I can not agree with you more as we enter this journey as Magnus Men (and women) our lives will change. The overall goal is to become a better person (leader/ professional), which in turn with is becoming a better husband, father, and Police Chief (Leader for my district).

        I can not wait to walk this journey of Magnus with all of you.

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        mtroscla@tulane.edu

        A very good point, as I navigate through my career I think back to what was important to me as an officer and how those things changed as I was promoted and my duties changed. For this reason its important to spend time in many positions and ranks as you mature in law enforcement, otherwise you will be missing valuable perspective on issues that affect your subordinates.

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      Major Stacy Fortenberry

      Donnie, I was in much the same situation. I began law enforcement because I needed a job after the Army and a neighbor got me. Started. It was not until I was working and the MAGNUS officers around me showed me what serving was about did the job turn into a career and eventually my calling.

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    Prior to starting this lesson my concept of a Magnanimous Officer was one of perfection, honor, and admiration. It seemed unattainable but something to strive for. As I listened to the concepts and examples cited there were a few keys that caught my attention. The first key was the numerous references to virtues and a virtuous life. While there were several lists such as Franklin's 13 virtues they all seemed to boil down to the concept of striving to improve the little things, doing the right thing (not always the easy thing), and finding ways to improve the person I already am. I wanted a definition for Magnanimous Officer. What I had found so far was the path.

    As I continued to listen and reflect on the readings my second key arrived in a concrete definition of what Magnanimous is. Magnus means great and manamous means mind. A Magnanimous Officer is one with a great mind. Through history we see these great minds and great lives from the ancients, the Greeks, the Romans and even present day leaders. That mind is a mixture of knowledge, health, service, and many other factors. Factors that can be described as virtues.

    Connecting the dots revealed what becoming a Magnanimous Officer can mean to me and my career. It is not that one shining moment when some great accomplishment is achieved. It is not a heroic act of self-sacrifice that will define the person. Instead it is the consistent daily pursuit of improvement of the small decisions, the little preparations, the virtues that make us ready when challenge arrives. It was stated in the presentation that challenges are opportunities to achieve. By preparing ourselves we lead those who follow us by example. We should step up and do the little things. Those we lead, work with, or supervise will follow this behavior and in doing so prepare themselves for their challenges. This will enhance my own own leadership capacity by creating more capable leaders surrounding me.

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      cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

      I could not agree more. It is not the one instance in our lives or careers that make who we are, it is that daily pursuit towards greatness. As young officers just starting out of the academy I believe that most of us have that want and drive to do and be better. As leaders in our organizations we should keep that going and if the young officers see the leaders around them doing so they will continue with that fire that they start out with.

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    Lieutenant John Champagne

    What I have learned from the Magnanimous Officer lecture is that a great leader begins with a great person. We all have a moral compass that guides us throughout our daily life. You can build on your moral compass through faith and family. These attributes will be on display while performing your daily duties. I have also learned that I can improve my daily performance. These improvements will allow me to become a Magnanimous Office within my agency.

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      ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

      I concur and we need to mentor other officers to adopt the philosophy to improve the organization as a whole.

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      McKinney

      Lt. Champagne,
      I agree with your statement entirely on having a moral compass. I’ve acquired this path like you through my friends, family, and faith. I try to incorporate those learned values in my day to day encounters with others.

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    anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

    This lecture has help me to first examine myself as a person, then as an officer, so I can be a benefit to my family, community, and anyone whom I may come in contact with in life. It has also given me a better understanding, tips and guidance on how to gain and keep the community trust, while conducting my daily work duties and being part of building a better future for the organization.

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    McKinney

    I found the opening “Policing & Magnus” to be the essential aspect of the overall direction of the lesson provided. The presenter establishes that we not only be technical at our profession but how we as leaders build the foundation for others that we’re surrounded by. I believe we must grow and or extend the virtues of those that we lead, manage, and follow. I advocate to those that I’m surrounded by to have a moral compass within their personal and professional life. I have found through literature or through a direct encounter with others that most grounded leaders and mentors are humble, honest, and are engaged with a high-level discipline. These lesson topics and learned experiences allow me to continue and or revisit paths, which are an essential requirement in my day to day activities with myself and others.

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    ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

    I believe all new officers begin their career Magnus. Most I have seen seem to lose it after a few years on the job. They tend to become cynical and develop a bad attitude in general. This costs a lot of officers their job and families. This must be conveyed to all officers and kept fresh in their mind to prevent going down the wrong road. This can only be accomplished by the leadership of the departments.

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      Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

      I do agree that most officers start out in this profession with a level of MAGNUS as you stated, this lesson showed us that becoming and remaining MAGNUS is a constant work in progress that must have a conscious effort applied every step of the way. I do concur that it becomes a MAGNUS leader's role, to continue to push for the development of the subordinates to strive to remain in the fight to be the best we can all be in both personal and professional role.

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    Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

    As I sat down and began my journey into the National Command and Staff College module #1, I feel that it was only right for our journey to start with a thorough definition of "magnanimous". That definition in its self provided by Aristotle as "Magnus"-Great and "animous"-Mind, spoke to you about the journey each of us is beginning here today. As the lesson continued and discussed different aspects of developing to becoming a "Great MInd" in not only our professional lives but also striving to lead that same life in our personal walk, a few keys components struck me as strong suits of my own leadership abilities but also highlighted multiple areas were I see the need for self growth. Do you also see room for improvement in some of your leadership qualities and ways to reach the goal of becoming a "MAGNUS" leader?

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      Lt. Jenkins:

      The personal growth that we all go through, not only makes us MAGNUS, but makes us great leaders who want the best for our family, department, and career. I hope that we all can reflect, and smell the roses on this journey.

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        Burke

        I agree. I think that it is something that we need to constantly examine because years equals complacency. It never hurts to take a look in the mirror and ask ourselves, are we keeping with the same ideals that we started this career with. Are we keeping our oath to the people we serve.

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      I also agree with you when you say that it was a perfect place for us to start our journey. The lecture reminded me of all the ways I can be a "Magnus" leader at work and in my personal life. It also opened by eyes to several areas of personal growth that i need to further develop to ensure that I continue on the path of become a better person, co-worker and supervisor.

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    The Magnus Man in the Mirror:

    I am starting this journey to be a Magnus Chief / Student / Learner a little bit different than the rest of this class. I know how to be a police officer, and have attended courses over the years on ethics and how to “be a leader.” I possessed all the right traits and characteristics of being a leader and most of the characters of being a Magnus officer. However, I fell short in the category of being a Shepard and how to lead the flock to the vision and goals of the agency. Being in a small department, I can not attend weeks of training and be gone from school for long periods. I am a Trilogy Graduate of FBI LEEDA, but that did not adequately prepare me for leading the flock of sheep that I Shepard.

    I fell hard last year and was in the fight for my career to save my job, and as I attended a Chiefs conference, I met Dr. Javidi and his team in a lecture that, when I started, thought, this session was a massive waste of time. I lost interest in the talk in the first thirty minutes. My wake up point in his speech was Dr. Javidi sharing with us about what MAGNUS meant, and how we can turbo-charge our leadership. He started to turbo-charge and energized my leadership. I learned more in his lecture that morning, then the whole conference.

    It was not until I enrolled in the Emerging Leaders course that I realized how little I knew about how to be a MAGNUS Leader. Although I completed phase one of my journeys, I still have many more things to learn about being a MAGNUS Chief, in phase two of my walk/trek I have established many goals for myself in a professional and personal way.

    In the past several months of being a changing chief based on learning how to lead in a MAGNUS way, I have changed and grown in so many ways. Today as I reviewed this lecture, I hope that I keep growing as a Magnus leader, but more important to me, it will show to my district and department that we all can be MAGNUS.

    To my teammates in session #09, I cannot wait to walk this journey with all of you. I can not wait to learn and see how we all have started and how we all will end up as MAGNUS Leaders.

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      jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

      Chief,

      I too was like you in the begging of my leadership career. I felt I had a good grasp on how to be a police officer. I was thrust into a leadership role and didn't know exactly how to lead a flock. Taking the course on being a MAGNUS officer or leader has already helped me. It has reminded me about the some of the Virtues I may have forgotten along the way. I am also hoping that by learning the MAGNUS way, it will help me to improve in every aspect of my life. The 4 behaviors really sunk in my brain, Observe, Listen, Learn and Act. The two main ones being Listen and Learn. I don't feel like anyone could get to a point in their leadership career where they don't feel they need to listen or learn.

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    cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

    As I start this journey to become a MAGNANIMOUS officer I guess I had certain expectations of what I might learn as leader within the organization that I work for. After listening to this first module the gears have sifted towards looking at myself not only in the scope of my work but also as an individual person and what can be changed for the better. As we learned from this lesson that "MAGNUS" equals "Great" and "ANIMOUS" equals "Great Mind", we must continually work on ourselves so that we can make the people that we work with and the people in the communities that we live in and work in to become great. I look forward to learning many more lessons throughout this journey with my teammates of session #9

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    mtroscla@tulane.edu

    After digesting the content of the lecture and supporting documents and data, my biggest take away is that it's not enough to possess these qualities, but one has to demonstrate them in everything that they do. Its not enough for a person to believe that they are trustworthy, loyal or what have you, but that others can see those virtues in you and evaluate you accordingly. In law enforcement, like many professions, perception is the reality, for instance a man could never tell a lie, but if others don't see him as honest, then it doesn't matter. The virtues of the MAGNUS officer are just the foundation of a great leader and I am excited to build on this foundation to become a better leader, and person.

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    Burke

    I believe that this session is a good refresher for some of us that have been in law enforcement for several years. We tend to get complacent in our duties, attitude, and outlook on what it is that we do. Magnus is a good reminder that we are the “tip of the spear”. We are the first and sometimes only representation of law and order that people will encounter. It is our duty to make sure that we hold ourselves to the highest of standards so what we project is positive and helpful to the people we are sworn to serve.

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    sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

    After listening to these first set of lectures, i began to identify with many if not all of the MAGNUS virtues within my own personality which i possessed prior to my Law Enforcement career. After 10 years total (Corrections up until now as a Patrol Sergeant), i like to think i have retained some of these virtues, but admit through time and experience on the job that some of them may have slightly eroded.

    I started this career which i love thinking i was going to save the World. As a lowly Correctional Deputy and especially on my first day exciting day being released from the Field Training Program (FTO) in my new shiny, pressed uniform patrolling in my first assigned unit.

    There are days when i come home from an especially hard shift, and having seen what humans are capable of toward each other. I can feel my Compassion starting to wane and tire out. I still feel most of the virtues listed in the lectures i still possess and hold dear to my heart, but i can feel the battery being drained. I still keep a priority of Honesty and telling the truth to be paramount to my belief system. Still i admit that my Compassion and Patience are slowly being drained. Which I'm sure isn't new territory for anyone in these discussions.

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      michael-beck@lpso.net

      Sid,
      I too have felt that battery draining because of my many years spent on Patrol. I believe what keeps me going, and will do so for years to come, is the knowledge that I have a compassionate heart. I still want to save those who cannot save themselves. Just remember why it is you got into this profession. It definitely was not for the money. There is no glory or fame. It is the ideal that you, and all the rest of us, are warriors with guardian hearts.

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    michael-beck@lpso.net

    While reviewing the materials from this lesson, I began to think about the supervisor I have become. I felt that I tried to embody the good virtues of the supervisors who came before me and work on the bits that I felt they needed to improve. It made be start to think about the how it is the officers with whom I work view me. Do they believe me to be a tyrant with unrealistic, unreachable goals? Or am I a leader, someone who shows them the way, who leads from the front, and works to make certain that not only they achieve the goals I have laid before them, but their personal goals. I believe I can help my officers by helping myself become a better MAGNUS leader. I will write down what I think are my good attributes and those which are not so good; okay let’s just call them bad. I know that I will first work on the ones which will make me a better family man which will in turn lend themselves to being a better leader. My goal will be to become a better person not only at work but all around and continue to grow.

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      cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

      I feel the same way on a lot of your points. It made me wonder what my detectives think about me. Do they see me as someone they can talk to for advice or do they just see me as their "Major". I think I will share your goal of becoming a better all around person.

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      Adam Gonzalez

      I appreciated reading your insight and honesty. I think that it us natural for us to compare ourselves to the leader that came before us. I know that I certainly have done this. I remember distinctly what my mother has said to me several times while growing up. She would tell me that it was always her hope that I and my siblings would take the best of what we had learned from her and my father and build upon those best practices for our own families. I believe that the same can be said regarding the leaders before us. I believe that they to would want those of us coming after them to take the very best of what we have learned from them and build upon that foundation while implementing the new best practices that we now learn. Thank you for your post.

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    jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

    A few of the main highlights for me while participating in the Virtues of the MAGNUS Officer, was the characteristic of Humility. Being a leader in my unit, I strive to be humble and remember those who have come before me and taken the time to help me along the way. I try to do the same for those who I am responsible for leading. I try to take the time to guide them, help them and mentor them. So hopefully one day they may remember that someone took the time to help them and in some ways pay it forward. Also keeping in mind that I too came from where they are now and remember the hurdles and struggles in my journey. It also hit home for me when the instructor spoke about understanding yourself. Knowing your strengths and weaknesses. Writing them down and working on area's of self improvement. This in itself is a weakness for me. Just simply looking in the mirror and trying to make myself better in areas I know I am weak. I believe sometimes I get so focused on helping those around me, that I may miss the fact that I myself can improve.

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      steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

      I feel the same as you do on the ability to see ones self. I do see some areas of improvement, but it seems it would be a great thing to have someone who knows us well, to be able to constructively assist us in making needed improvements. We as leaders that fail to help those under us realize these improvement areas, are not serving a great leadership quality in my point of view.

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    While listening to the lecture Virtues of a Magnanimous Officer, I found myself doing a mental checklist of the virtues and characteristics that were discussed in the lecture. I began to question if I was doing enough on a day to day basis at work to ensure that the younger generation of law enforcement officers at my department were reminded of what it takes to perform this job at its highest level. I believe it is crucial to stay true to yourself and hold on to the "Magnus" values that each of us possess and continue to work towards being even better leaders and role models for the younger generation. I look forward to learning more about myself and ways in which I can improve and become a better "Magnus" leader for the next generation.

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      Lt. Mark Lyons

      I agree. One of the things I enjoy most about my role as a trainer/mentor, is that I get to spend the first five weeks with every new hire to our agency. It’s a role that I am honored to have, and a role that I take very seriously.

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    cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

    This lecture opened my eyes to what it means to be a Magnus Officer and how we as leaders need to concentrate every day to keep this mindset. All to often we get caught up in our job responsibilities and we do not pay attention to molding the young men and women under our charge. Like we learned in this lecture, The Virtues Of A Magnanimous Officer is a journey, a way of life, a way of thinking. I know I need to do a better job of making everyone around me want to be better and pass on these virtues. I think we are all good leaders. We just get off track as the years go by and forget to nourish the people we supervise.

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      clouatre_kj@jpso.com

      I agree wholeheartedly with your statement. The grind of my daily duties push me off track with why I set my goals to be a commander. I wanted to become a commander so I could mentor men and women the same way I was guided. I force myself each day to walk around and show my presence and to see if anyone needs advice or simply to check on family issues and their well being. It is a responsibility and a privedge to lead. This will be a great refresher on why we chose this path.

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    steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

    As I look at the notes from this lesson it brings me back to the history of my career and those that have mentored and contributed to my growth. I was at one point early in my career as one of those that was not happy, disgruntled or just unsatisfied with my profession and through their "MAGNUS" characteristics, helped me change for the better and provide a positive influence to my career and growth. When looking at the self reflection of the virtues of a MAGNUS law enforcement officer, I see areas I have strengths in and other that I have weaknesses and strive to learn ways to make improvements.

    What really strikes most interest is the MAGNUS beliefs of health in the physical, mental, emotional and spirtual areas of life in general. I would much rather be in a position that allows a cohesive ability to maintain each of these areas with regard to both personal and professional life.

    I'm looking forward to improving my leadership ability to assist others as I was assisted in becoming the best MAGNUS officer I can be.

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      I have to agree with your post. When doing the reading, I was finding myself drawn back to every leader I had had in police work or the military. I see areas that I want to improve in myself and things that I wish I had known earlier, in my career.

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      dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

      Steven I know exactly what you mean as you speak of being in a place being unhappy and disgruntled in our profession. I know we started in this business around the same time and had the pleasure of working for a short time alongside you. As stated in the opening we had the "shoulders of the giants before us" to guide us back to where we are now.

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      Steven, it is interesting that you took interest in that particular MAGNUS belief. This area is often ignored however it is the one that effects us the most. Also thanks for sharing the impact a MAGNUS leader had on your life.

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    clouatre_kj@jpso.com

    This lesson provided me with a solid overview of what it means to be a "MAGNUS" officer. I learned the specific virtues associated with a MAGNUS officer as well as detailed beliefs and behaviors to compliment those virtues. After hearing the term, "Guardian Heart", it brought me back to why I became a police officer in the first place. It describes why we do what we do and why we were all drawn to this profession.

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    guttuso_fa@jpso.com

    What I learned in this module is to try to be the best me that I can be. To look past myself and see the "big picture" in that I am representing more than just myself. I am representing my department and law enforcement as a whole. It reinstated the fact the Law enforcement is fluid, changing and evolving constantly and I must push myself to continuously evolve, learn and improve myself along the way and not get stuck with the, "well that's the way we always did it" mentality. That those under my command are looking to me for leadership and I need to display the qualities discussed in this module describing a MAGNUS officer, with the hope that they will follow my lead and leave that legacy with them. I have always tried to live my life, personally and professionally, by the idea that it is not what you do when you are being watched, but what you do when you are not being watched. I believe this is part of what this module is conveying to me. We can all fake it, which is easy, but to be a MAGNUS officer, you need to live and believe the virtues discussed.

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    Major Stacy Fortenberry

    "The best part of becoming MAGNUS is the journey never ends" That struck a chord with me. I always thought that my moral compass pointed north and relied on it to guide me through tough times. What I realize is that I have grown complacent in my continuing journey to become better, to become virtuous. This weekend I will take time to look within and make my list of things I need to work on to improve myself to better serve those I am responsible to and for. May this course help us all become better people and in turn better leaders.

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      guttuso_fa@jpso.com

      I agree S. Fortenberry. I think throughout our career we all become complacent at one time or another and it a constant challenge to not get stuck in that rut. Hopefully, by the end of this course, that challenge will become less challenging and it opens our minds to the fact that change can be good and that our ways are not always the best way.

      Frank Guttuso

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        chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

        I totally agree with your response. I remember going to a class and they explained to us about the complacency, which could make a huge problem in your career. I do believe after going through this class it will give us a very different outlook on things in our everyday job duties.

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      mmoscona@floodauthority.org

      I totally agree. I can see it in myself . I have become complacent in a number of areas and I can see where I need to improve. I think this course will help this old dog learn some new tricks and become a much better leader.

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    Adam Gonzalez

    Perhaps the lesson that stood out most for this module is the lesson of virtue. As pointed out in earlier posts, it seemed most prudent that the word magnus was first defined and then expanded upon. Virtue was the synonym that best related or defined the word magnus. Benjamin Franklin taught that virtue was one of the most noble of all morals and most worthy of our attention and achievement. Interestingly, virtue is probably not the more common schools of thought when regarding the police profession. I believe that this is so for both those within and those without this discipline. However, if we are to reach the great heights that is before each of us and to further this nobility, clearly we must embrace and constantly pursue this most valuable ideal. In doing so, we will strengthen and enhance the trust and integrity of our chosen profession, the public in which we serve and, as taught, our own personal lives.

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    chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

    In Module 1, I've learned that becoming a Magnus officer is something that you should want to grow to be when in the field of law enforcement. Becoming a Magnus you want to show professionalism, fairness and become action oriented. I've learned showing honesty, mobility, respect, responsibility and being loyal will take you a long way as being a leader. I've also learned that having the Magnus mindset I would need to assess my strength and weaknesses. Some of the examples that I will use more to enhance my leadership will be to observe, listen, learn and then act. Those are things that I know personally that I need to work better on to do in order to grow as a leader.

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    Hello All,

    Based on the virtual lecture I have just partaken in, "Virtues of Magnanimous Officers", I wish to discuss several key takeaways. The review is extremely impactful and should make the audience completely re-evaluate your everyday life. The "MAGNUS" virtues that were discussed go back to ancient times as the lecturer stated, Aristotle embraced these known attributes. It is obvious that even in ancient times, enlightened individuals were able to appreciate and convey what "MAGNUS" leadership can accomplish when applied with vigor, morality, and direct purpose. It is readily apparent to me that the highlighted virtues can help any officer, new or veteran, to become "exemplary" for what we all signed up to do.
    The "MAGNUS" virtues were discussed often. The list of qualities mentioned by the lecturer; impartiality, integrity, professionalism, prudence, gratitude, and virtuosity to name a few should be applied daily. These are things we can all strive to enact daily, whether at work or home. I try to do these things everyday so that I can contribute to my agency, family, friends, and society as we go about our daily lives. The model behaviors mentioned during the lecture are also important. The four behaviors of the "MAGNUS" officer/leader as discussed are to observe, listen, learn, and to act. If these principals are enacted and applied during any officer(s) and/or leader(s) time at their respective agencies, homes, neighborhoods, or daily lives; it will inspire others to act alike and to reciprocate.
    I believe these types of individuals can be the "motivation" needed to shape and direct future law enforcement personnel. These types of individuals are always needed in our society, especially today's world of modern law enforcement. For the individuals that are privileged enough to engage in these learning opportunities, we owe it to "pay it forward" to our fellow man. As leaders, we need to share and learn from our experiences as Aristotle has professed for hundred of years. If we can connect with people to share these "MAGNUS" virtues and qualities, we stand to make our society better as a whole!

    Regards,

    Mike Shard

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      mmoscona@floodauthority.org

      Very eloquently stated Mike. Our problem as a profession is that we, over the years have become our own worse enemy. We became such a closed society that the public has lost contact with us as people. WE must not loose sight that some high profile issues of wrong doing and criminality within our profession by non-MAGNUS officers, has damaged our reputation to a point that a large portion of society just plain doesn't like or trust us. If we are to regain the trust of the public then we must focus our efforts to change our mindset first. If we all strive to do our jobs as MAGNUS officers at all times, then our officers learn by example. Then the public sees that we operate in a respectful, professional manner. Then just maybe trust can be restored.

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    Lt. Mark Lyons

    I am a firm believer that almost everyone who decides to begin a career in law enforcement already possesses some of the core values described in this training module. I also believe that the progression of each new officer to becoming MAGNUS is directly influenced by the culture that exists within the agency they work for. It's not enough that the agency has a well worded mission statement or fancy “motto” that implies high moral, ethical, and professional values. It’s how we as administrators, supervisors and mentors live up to those values and demonstrate, first hand, the virtues of becoming a magnanimous officer.

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      blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree with you as well, Lieutenant. I believe we can only help bring out the new officers' virtues if we are striving to be magnanimous officers. As supervisors, we have to lead by example.

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      Lt, I could not agree with you more. I would liken our duty as supervisors and senior leaders to truly lead our staff with the dignity, respect and courage they so deserve to the duty we expect them to treat our public and partners. I have found there are quite a few agencies around with really cool mission statements and values, but rarely do you find the culture follows suit. I am not a leftist, but believe that reform in today's policing should be seriously and carefully considered and part of that reform could potentially mean redefining the mission and core values of agencies large (more so) and small and adhering to it with major cultural shifts.

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      Sergeant Kelly Lee

      Lt. Lyons,

      I would certainly have to agree with you that everyone who enters this profession already possesses at some level the core values needed to do this job. I have heard many times throughout my life/career that it takes a "special person" to be a police officer and I truly believe that it does. It is up to us and our departments to take it the next level and become those MAGNUS officers that our departments and more importantly our communities and families need.

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    In reviewing the first lesson, I am looking at it to set the tone for the course. If this is the case, I may be in trouble. The virtues of the leader in what is considered "Magnus," seems to present an ideal officer and leader that can be quite intimidating. "Great Mind" and "Virtuous Man" are terms that we should aspire to. To many the ideals of this course could be seen as "corny" or naïve. Those are impressions that must change. Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrifty, Brave, Clean, Reverent. No this is not my paraphrase of the virtues of the Magnus Way, these are the twelve points of the Scout Law. I bring these up, not to belittle or make fun of the virtues, but to show that the journey that we have undertaken brings many, if not all full circle to the values that the institutions of our youth were trying to tell us then.

    As stated by an earlier post, "the journey never ends." We have entered into this stage to give us a refresher in our past training and experiences. When reading from one of our manuals, I am reminded of my past, in the profession, both good and bad. This is a life long process to make us the best officer, leader and person that we can be.

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    mmoscona@floodauthority.org

    I believe that almost all law enforcement officers when they entered into the profession did so on the premise of wanting to serve with the ideas set forth in the description of a MAGNUS OFFICER. I think a great many of our fellow officers through the years have unfortunately gotten away from what makes this a great and noble profession. It is through courses like this that will restore our leaders to lead by example and thus pay it forward to the future leaders. If we live and work with virtuous values then it should in turn lead our subordinates to live and work in the same way.

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    dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

    After beginning learning are #1, module #1, I was immediately reminded of things learned through going through the Institute for Credible Leadership Development (ICLD) I-IV. It reminded me of why each decision I make has the following order of importance, how will it affect the community, my sheriff, my department, my division, and lastly myself. It reminds us to observe what is going on around us, to listen to what others are saying, learning from those observations and thoughts, and then acting on them. This journey that is beginning for the rest of us today in Session #9 of the National Command College will promote us becoming Magnanimous Leaders and I look forward to completing this journey with you all.

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    blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

    Senior officers told me when I started my career in law enforcement. It takes a particular and right person to be a police officer. Not everyone can be a police officer. I believe that the “right” person already has the virtues of being a Magnus Officer; they do not know what a Magnus Officer consists of or how to apply the attributes. As leaders of our departments, it is our responsibility to bring out the best in our employees. There are senior officers with our department who will never change, but the change has to start somewhere. I have many years left before retirement. Our department has been giving us the training to become Magnus Officers, which a majority of our department has learned and they are following. I have already seen a change in our department, which I believe will only get better as this training continues for our officers.

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      dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree with what you said. Both you and I have many years left and change begins with us. Policing many years ago was very different. There were no skills taught on how to be virtuous or any perspectives on action-based models as there are today. As society changes, especially in the information age we live in now, we must change with it and stay ahead of it.

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    dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

    Well everyone, we are now able to finally get started an join you all. What a great way to get started and that is identifying what are the virtues of a magnanimous officer. Depending on how you view their importance is ultimately going to determine what virtues mean the most to us. I found that integrity can encompass a vast majority of the many virtues that exist. It seems that without integrity, there is no moral compass. Without integrity, any and all other virtues can potentially falter.

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      cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree Lt. Gros in that integrity is one of the virtues that we all must embody to truly be Magnus. Integrity goes hand in hand with many of the other virtues such as truthfulness, honor and nobility.

      We cannot have mutual trust and respect without integrity. It is a crucial component in making deliberate choices with compassion. We must ensure we are acting for the right reasons.

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    This module focused on defining a MAGNUS officer. After listening to the MAGNUS beliefs, it was rewarding to know that I share the same beliefs. One of my biggest take away is knowing that sharing my vision and leadership with my coworkers is MAGNUS. This module introduced so many qualities of a great leader. Remembering that I can not change the world without first changing myself is vital because it is easy to see others' weaknesses before we can see our own. After going through this module, I know by the end of session #9 I will have the courage to be the best version of myself.

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    cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

    In Module 1, Lt. Chris Hoina advised that the Magnanimous Officer is is guided by the Magnus virtues and that "there is more to policing than enforcing crime and being productive." So many times we can get caught up in the day operations, we can easily lose sight of our main purpose as public servants which is helping to continually improve ourselves, our agency and our community. I agree that we must observe, listen , learn and act accordingly and in the context of each situation. We must continuously evolve to keep with the every changing world we live in.

    We must stay vigilant and challenge ourselves to continue to improve and make a difference.

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    dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

    In this module, Lt. Chris Hoina spoke of the virtues of the Magnanimous Officer. In my experience, I think one virtue that is often forgotten is the virtue of gratitude. I have often worked for supervisors who have forgotten what it was like to be a young officer and to make mistakes. Also, the Magnus behavior of listening seems to have been forgotten. I find that people tend to hear just so they can respond, rather than listen to understand,

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      dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

      Gratitude is a must. As far as listening people only listen to what they want to hear to push there own narrative and beliefs.

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      Sergeant Durand Ackman

      I completely agree when you mentioned listening seems to be forgotten. Sometimes you can tell people are not truly listening, they are simply waiting for an opportunity to talk. I have always tried to be a good listener and try to understand the other person's perspective. Obviously I'm not always successful, but that is generally what I try.

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    dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

    As we begin to progress through the virtues of a Magnus officer we are presented with the ideas of ways, beliefs, mindset and behaviors that exemplifies what this Magnus officer should encompass. Where I believe all that information is factual I believe that before you can achieve the Magnus office you first must achieve being a Magnus person. You have to have these virtues in your everyday life, you cannot achieve being a Magnus Officer without having these same beliefs in your everyday life. So you first must be a decent human being that possess these qualities at your own free will.

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      Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

      I agree with his above comment, if your personal life is a mess, you will not be able to have a successful professional career.

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    Sergeant James Schueller

    Considering all that is going on in the world right now, specifically the attention being focused on "negative" Police behaviors, I found this section, Virtues of Magnanimous Officers, to be not only timely, but in my case, needed. Even though I have been proudly serving in this profession for 21 years now, the current constant barrage from the media depicting Police as the enemy, negative and violent encounters with citizens, and calls to defund the Police, it can be easy (but dangerous) to forget why I wanted to do this job, and what this profession truly stands for. Although this was the opening to the curriculum, it definitely set the right tone for what I hope to learn, utilize, and pass on. The characteristics and traits detailed in the 'Magnus Way' are reminders of our duty and what we as a profession stand for. Again, with what is happening in society right now, the fact that we must live by these as guideposts in both our professional and personal lives in order to truly be Magnus ties in why I am happy I was allowed to participate in this course. Even though the word warrior is under scrutiny right now, I truly believe in the phrase Warriors with Guardian Hearts used in this section. It's powerful and accurate, and shows the dual pressures of what we do. The fact that positive changes made now may take time to come to fruition, may include the fact that I will no longer be on the job when that end result occurs. However, this section pointed out that positive steps may help define, than lead, the next generation of policing. To me that is an exciting possibility, and further defines one of my favorite pieces that I took from this section- The journey of becoming a Magnus Officer never ends.

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      Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

      I agree Jim, with the atmosphere around policing today these topics are truly timely. I think you nailed it when you said that this sets the tone for the remainder of the class and how we can pass on what we learn. As much as I dislike watching the news I found myself every now and then turning it on (and being reminded of why I don't watch it), they mentioned no longer allowing "warrior style training"- the news broadcast and persons wanting to discontinue this style of training never really gave their definition of what they think "warrior style training" is...I think there is a misconception of what our training really is... it all boils down to having that guardian mindset

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      Christopher Lowrie

      Spot on Jim. I agree that a Magnus officer never rests on one's laurels. Leading a virtuous life both on and off duty will help guide a Magnus officer during these trying times.

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      Gregory Hutchins

      James-
      As with many of the themes of these initial posts, your viewpoint on how this initial course is an excellent reminder for the audience of the actual values of this profession; while our challenges, of late, are seemingly more negative, these events have existed within our society since its inception. Ultimately, the values of magnanimity continually serve as the core of our ability to serve with distinction and to rise above this set of challenges.
      As mentioned, the requirement to adhere to these established truths in both our professional and personal lives is all that more important. To an extent, today’s society and scrutiny demand this behavior pattern due to the transparency in all of our lives with the prevalence of social media. No longer can an individual maintain a dual life. Granted, this should never occur, as, over time, the boundaries between professional and personal lives ultimately collide, usually with extreme destructive recourses.
      As leaders on a journey through this program of instruction, the ability to take the theory of magnanimity from that of a personal mantra to that of what is being promoted, mentored, and supported should be the accurate measure of success for leaders tasked with improving the conditions and character of the next generation of law enforcement professionals.

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    For me, the selected readings, module and Badge Cast 1 episode pointed to a very strong focus on the study of human behavior coupled with awareness of self. I began to understand that studying aspects of human behavior (i.e. leadership, influence and dilemma – “The Manual” Chapter 1) and what stage people are in during their life at work (“The Manual” Chapter 3), coupled with comprehending sub-systems within (and without) the organization that can predict those behaviors even when change is constant (micro-view), leaders can understand how their organization and its mission effects the organization, how the external environment effects the organization and how leaders understand their responsibility to society (macro-view) (“The Manual” Chapter 2).

    There was also a strong focus on self-awareness and development in the articles (The Natural Pursuit of Virtue in Policing and Success is Equal Opportunity), the Badge Cast 1 episode with Michael Lee Stallard and the module itself. Understanding the complete definition of the Magnus Officer (way, beliefs, mindset and behaviors) to understanding that the life of the Guardian Heart is continuously evolving, I really began to shift my focus to my own behaviors; some strengths and definitely some shortcomings. I understand that being Magnus isn’t just possessing the traits (justice, courage, wisdom and temperance), but knowing that by giving others vision, value and a voice is the only way to truly master those fours overarching traits. I am hoping the modules that follow will strike me in ways, as this one did, that allow me to internalize and further develop what I currently do and how I do it so that I can continuously improve not only in my professional life but with my personal relationships, as well. I very much look forward to this journey I hope will never end.

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    Sergeant Kelly Lee

    Never at a point in my 24 year career in Law Enforcement has this topic been more on point. Before entering this class, reading the material and watching the videos I thought I was doing a decent job of being a good cop, role model and partner. Examining the MAGNUS Officer from every angle certainly shows us all what is needed and the areas for improvement that most likely we all need. The section related to the MAGNUS mindset is spot on when saying first we need to commit to being and doing better followed up by actually doing something to change. The third point of looking at/accessing ourselves first, hits both close to home and in our work and everyday home lives. As stated later on in the lecture the becoming and being a MAGNUS Officer never quits and only allows us to continually grow both personally and professionally. The last key take away points are powerful in the sense that it shows us we need to prioritize where we can and tweak the positive things. I think sometimes we forget that although positive things are happening and things are going well that we can always look back and improve.

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      Deputy Mitchell Gahler

      There's no doubt in my mind that we all are doing a decent job of being a good cop, role model and partner. The rewarding part is looking back from when we started, from the positive to our negative experiences, how we grow personally and professionally, and how we have affected others. Like you stated, being a MAGNUS Officer never quits. We continue to improve from those experiences and grow as a person. We are always hard on ourselves and expect to do better. The fun part is that we all have the capacity to do better, we just have to take the initiative to make that happen.

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        Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

        I agree with your comment about how rewarding it is to look back at where we started, both the positive and negative, to see how we have grown both personally and professionally. The desire to better ones self and learn from our experiences allows us to grow. We must therefore be intentional in our daily strive towards being a MAGNUS officer.

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    Lt. Joseph Flavin

    As I sat here and listened to the Virtues of Magnanimous Officers, I found it very enlightening. The MAGNUS Officer is one that I think when we all started this profession, we all wanted to be. I can admit there have been times early in my career where I lost sight of this. When he discussed the MAGNUS Mindset and brought up the idea of jotting down your strengths and weaknesses, I found that very beneficial to do because it showed me areas where I need the most improvement. As was stated multiple times towards the end of the lecture, MAGNUS officers are warriors with guardian hearts. I will definitely use and incorporate things I learned in this module into my everyday life. I'll reference shared vision and shared leadership to enhance my capabilities as a supervisor.

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    Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

    Virtues of Magnanimous Officers: I appreciated this course starting off with a brief history lesson going into the definition/origination of magnanimous as well as mentioning Sir Robert Peel. Discussing and defining how Magnanimous Officer’s are fair, action oriented, and professional gave a solid lead into the traits of Magnanimous Officers (virtues, beliefs, and behaviors). When listening to the lectures as they dove deeper into these traits it struck me that these topics and points apply to not just seasoned leaders in law enforcement, but they can apply to the officer who is day 1 out on the street. Integrity, honor, respect, setting high expectations, being goal oriented, learning, and taking action; these are just a few points mentioned that apply to all of us in law enforcement. There were a few discussion topics that really spoke to me: #1: The goal of striving to be a Magnanimous Officer is never ending, we can always strive to be better, to learn more, to listen more, and to act by passing on what we have learned to other officers. #2: This not only applies to our professional life, but it flows into our personal lives, holding high expectations for ourselves, maintaining our health (physical, mental, etc…), and having gratitude can set the example for our communities. Listening to the lectures I found myself continuously nodding in agreement and being reminded of why I went into law enforcement and joined this noble calling.

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      Lt. Joseph Flavin

      Very well said. This was the first time I have heard of the Magnanimous Officer and about being MAGNUS. The longer the lesson went on, the more I also found myself nodding in agreement with what was being said. I think being MAGNUS is something that, as an agency, we can pass along to not only the veterans but the new hires as well. Incorporating lessons learned here into the FTO process can take steps toward positive changes within police departments.

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      Sergeant Matt Wieland

      I agree with this, and haven't read anything on Peel since skills. I found it very interesting that Sir. Robert Peel's philosophies on policing so many years ago are still so relevant today. I especially liked the concept that "the police are the public and the public are the police".

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        Ryan Manguson

        I agree as well. It's interesting to see departments swinging, yet again, back to Sir Robert Peel's original concept of Community Policing. RPD a few years ago switch to an Intelligence Lead Policing model that was very data driven. In all the classes and books I read on Intelligence Lead Policing it talked about doing it in tandem with Community Policing. We struggled with integrating the two philosophies together. We are now swinging back towards Community Policing. Sir Robert Peel's teachings from 1829 are still relevant today.

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    Deputy Mitchell Gahler

    This was a very rewarding and intriguing module, as I share many of the same beliefs and meet many of the characteristics of being MAGNUS. A few key points that I took away from this module were: everyone has the capacity to be better, character is a matter of choice, and decide to be remarkable now. Not only in our careers, but in life, the opportunity to work hard and to "be better," is available for everyone, it's just hard sometimes, as the choice and extra work may be difficult. The module explained how attitude is the difference. I try my hardest on a daily basis to have a positive attitude and to be humble and to positively affect others around me. I try to lead by example and do good deeds and let my positive actions define who I am. Being remarkable now and improving on a daily basis to become better is something I strongly believe in and will implement into my life in order to be successful.

    In this module, I appreciated the material which I will implement into my development in being a more defined Magnanimous Officer. "Look, listen, learn, do."

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    Sergeant Matt Wieland

    The first thing that jumped out at me when hearing this lesson was the idea of being introspective, or taking a close look at yourself on a regular basis. This is an especially hard task for law enforcement officers, because we spend a great deal of time handling calls and responding to situations with the public that clearly are people at a low point in their life. We like to think that we are squared away because we have to be for our jobs, but if we go through our careers thinking this, then we never allow for the personal growth that comes with being introspective. Becoming MAGNUS means continuously improving. To be continuously improving, we first have to be able to except the fact that we aren't perfect in the first place, and that admitting this is not a sign of weakness. Continuous improvement means making changes in our lives that will ultimately make us better officers, better family members, and better citizens in our communities.
    The second thing that this lesson made me think: Are we screening new candidates for law enforcement for the character traits that make up a MAGNUS officer? Often times we are focusing on how well someone knows statutes or how well they speak in an interview. But are we asking questions or presenting scenarios that test their moral compass?

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      Ryan Manguson

      I agree, having the ability to be introspective and understand your own strengths and weaknesses helps you grow as a person and a leader. Continuous improvement and evaluation helps improve not only ourselves but also those around us.

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      Maja Donohue

      I could not agree with you more. Looking inward is the first and the hardest step on the path to growth. We cannot be effective at our jobs if we are numb to the human experience and refuse to acknowledge our own shortcomings. People who love their jobs have a positive outlook on life and they aspire to do more, and coincidentally, these are the people who embrace continuous improvement.

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      Sergeant Michael Prachel

      Hi Matt,
      How true is that – we are constantly solving someone else’s problems, going from call to call. Often times these are just momentary “fixes” and do not solve the root problem. Meanwhile, we lack trying to improve ourselves because we are caught up in the police work. Whether it is improving a tactic or just a mindset, sometimes we overlook it because it worked, or was working. But, over time, it may not work again. By trying to surface our weaknesses, and then strengthen them, it will only benefit us.
      This also is true to your second point regarding new hires. We are sometimes blinded by the technicalities and if the individual knows “how to police”. But sometimes we miss if they are able to possess some of the virtuous qualities that a Law Enforcement professional should carry. Teaching recruits about qualities, such as: truthfulness, integrity, honor, nobility, humility, faithfulness, respect, responsibility, prudence, and gratitude, will benefit them on their career path.

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    Ryan Manguson

    Virtues of a Magnanimous Officer: This was a great start to the course, I had never heard of the term Magnanimous or being referred to as a Magnanimous Officer. Having this first session break down and define the meaning and traits of a Magnanimous Officer really puts it into perspective. I feel all officers enter the profession striving to be a magnanimous officer without even knowing that’s who they want to be. Thinking back to the start of my career and those I trained as a training officer. We all strive to be Magnanimous without knowing that’s what we were doing. Officers who are fair, action oriented, act deliberately and with compassion, accountable for our actions. All while conducting ourselves with honor, integrity, nobility, respect, gratitude, and humility. A Magnanimous Officer appears to be the gold standard of a successful police officer as well as the expectation from the public of police.

    Another great takeaway from this lesson came from the podcast with Michael Lee Stallard. Stallard talked about the importance of connections both professionally and personally. The importance of having a good balance personal and professional. The importance of having a mentor, being a mentor, coaching, and building up those around you. One of the most poignant takeaways from the podcast for me was some parting advice from Stallard on how to increase your connections. He said, “Be Present”. Be present in you conversation, don’t check your phone, don’t have it out. Just be present in the moment, in the conversation. This is in all of life, personal and professional. This was a great reminder and something we all fall victim to in our fast paced lives.

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      I also like the "be present." In my Sheriff position I have had to learn to "Be Present" when my staff comes in my office to talk with me. Many times I am very busy and will be answering e-mails or typing a memo. I will have staff come in and sit down and began talking and I have found myself in the past continuing to work or type while they talk. This has caused some of them to feel that they can't come in and talk to me. I have learned that you have to make time for your employees in order for them to feel important. It will also portray to them the feeling that you do not care. If you do not set your work aside for at least a few minutes and engage them they will feel that their ideas are not important to you. It took me hearing a few comments from others that I was always to busy for them to make this change. Now I make it appoint to sit up in my desk lean forward, quit typing and take a few minutes to listen to them and it has really helped me communicate and make those employee connections that are so important.

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        Guilty! I find it very difficult at times to "unplug" from my work and focus on the people, what really matters most. In college, I learned that we should keep a list of all those who report to us and make it a point to personally connect with one of those people daily and work through the entire list, then start over. Personal connections are huge in life. I also try to remember where I came from. When I was a new deputy and the sheriff or another administrator gave attention my way, I remember those encounters. Likewise, we as current leaders need to remember the power have merely in our positions.

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      Jacqueline Dahms

      I agree with you 100%. Magnanimous officer has never been a term I have heard. But when we talk about traits in those leaders that were or are great, all these virtues come into play. I also think our role as magnanimous officers changes over time, especially when we take leadership positions. At least for me it has become more about how I can impact and improve upon the people around me and those that I lead than the inmates I use to supervise. Being present is huge for me and yet I often get distracted still because I think I'm just too busy.

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    Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

    One of the topics that stood out to me in this track was the idea of "practicing humility today will improve your leadership tomorrow". I think one of the ideas people have is that when you are promoted you automatically know the answers to everything and if you don't it's a negative connotation on you. I also believe that there is a misconception by many that humility is a weak attribute. We have been led to believe that people who are humble are easily "bulldozed" and don't stand up for themselves. In reality, humility isn't about being passive or weak. It's about showing respect and recognizing the truth in situations whether you are on the right side of the truth or not. It's not about thinking less of yourself but rather thinking about yourself less and more of others. It's about being present.

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      Sergeant Paul Gronholz

      I agree that humility is an essential quality that leaders must possess. Too often, arrogance is mistaken for confidence in law enforcement. Many times, leaders in law enforcement want to portray themselves as ultra confident when really, they're just arrogant. The terrible thing is that arrogance in leadership and law enforcement then creates animosity among Officers towards leadership and citizens towards the Police. Arrogance doesn't allow Leaders/Officers that possess it to ask for help when they need it, the ability to say that they don't know something, or the recognition that someone may be better than them at a particular task. Humility is not weakness, in fact, it's the opposite. Humility is strength!

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      An analogy I have used with my son. "Dad, did you see that strike out I threw?" My response, "do you see all the people in the bleachers? They saw the great pitches you threw" The point I was making, it's ok to get excited about the good things we've done. Being proud is just fine. When it goes to the excess, gloating, that becomes unattractive. When we do good work, people notice we don't' have to say one word. Humility is so important and your point does show respect and maturity.

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    Sergeant Paul Gronholz

    MAGNUS Behaviors are something that leaders need to continually perform. These are actions that magnanimous leaders put into practice on a daily basis. Observe, Listen, Learn, Act. Leaders have failed by being too quick to act, ignoring the other three behaviors of magnanimous leaders. Observe- try to take in as much as you can. As Lt Chris Hoina stated, is not necessarily going on. In order to get to the root of the problem and solve it, you have to take the time to observe. Listen- As a CIT coordinator, I teach others the use active listening when handling people in crisis. Law enforcement leaders do a good job of putting that into practice during a call, but then fail to listen to their Officers when they have issues or concerns and also fail to listen to others in their personal lives. Learn- Its a shame that more Officers don't take the time to learn something new. It seems that Officers only want to learn if they see a financial benefit for themselves, rather than just making themselves better people. Act- Leaders must then act on the information and knowledge they've acquired. You can't be a magnaminous leader without taking action! Magnus leaders must put all four behaviors into practice to be successful.

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      Sergeant Chad Blanchette

      Well said Paul. One of the best pieces of advice I received before being promoted was to make sure you gather all the facts before moving forward. There always seems to be more than what is being shown on the surface.

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    I had many takeaways and thoughts from the first module. The first of many was the phrase, shared leadership and the whole is greater than the sum. In any department there are many moving parts and if those parts are not in sync or one part is working alone, we do not get the benefit of efficiency and good communication. If all parts are working together communication is increased and we can accomplish more. As it pertains to leadership if a departments command staff is not working together and delivering the same message then it causes confusion and does not allow people to get on the same page, undermining the leadership. I have delivered that message with my command staff telling them that we don't have to agree on everything, we should talk about the pros and cons of our decision, but once we leave our discussion and walk through the door we have to deliver the same message.

    I also liked the four behaviors observe, listen, learn and act. This is a great step by step process to follow before making decisions. Often times we as leaders make the mistake of not gathering all of the information on a situation before acting. That can lead to our staff second guessing their decisions and giving them the feeling that we do not trust them. This is extremely crucial, especially now with the current climate in policing. Often times those judging police actions are quick to judge before all the facts are known. I have made this mistake a few times in sending out department e-mails and have now learned to sit back think about a situation for a day or two before I respond rather than responding out of emotion and it has helped me immensely.

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      Kyle Phillips

      I agree with your statement about being on the same page, delivering a unified message to subordinates. I have witnessed how a non-uniform message and command staff positioning can be detrimental to the organization, causing resentment, pot stirring and tension.

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    Sergeant Chad Blanchette

    In trying not to simplify this too much, Admiral Clark said it best. “What we do matters…..” In this day and age with the media, social media and politicians beating us down on a regular basis, this is crucial to remember. In trying to keep politics out of this as much as possible, former First Lady Obama said it best when she said “When they go low, we go high”. I feel like this is part of being a Magnanimous Officer. Whether we like it or not, we are held to the highest standard and it is what the public expects and deserves out of each and every one of us. It is having your personal (mental and physical) and professional life squared away, so we can lead and do our jobs with confidence. If a leader can go forward with the “Connection Culture”, while incorporating 1. Vision 2. Voice and Value into daily operations, the entire team will succeed.

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      Lt. Marlon J Shuff

      You are correct; as police officers, we are continually being held to a higher standard. With modern technology such as body cameras, dash cameras, and surveillance cameras being commonplace, every word we speak and the decisions we make are captured on video. For this reason, we must hold ourselves and our fellow officers to the highest standard and act accordingly.

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      I could not agree more.. "What we do Matters". I have also found that what we do not do.. hurts us as well. When officers willfully neglect their duties, fail to follow policy and fail to intervene when the situation dictates, our profession suffers in ways that most of the rank and file do not comprehend. It effects public trust. it lends credibility to false perceptions and leads to fear and apprehension in the communities we serve.

      Dave G

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    The module makes clear that in the Magnus way several traits that should be evident in a Magnanimous Police Officer. Truthfulness, integrity, honor, nobility, humility, faithfulness, respect, responsibility, prudence and gratitude. I thing that these traits are important, not only in police work, but in everything we do. As a Christian these precepts align with what God has directed us to do and what we must strive for in our walk in the Lord. When we fail, it is because we have chosen to ignore these concepts and in doing so we stand alone. It is in that isolation failure, bad judgment and sin awaits us. The Bible makes clear that we should surround ourselves with like minded believers and so should the Magnanimous Police Officer.

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      Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

      I agree with you, I've been in this field, Corrections for a total of 20 years. This has showed me how to communicate with people of all cultures and different generations. I'm always trying to give guidance and show that there is always a better way of doing things.

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    Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

    I take great pride in helping my peers, and to be a better citizen of my community. I am passionate about helping others to reach their goals, this gives me a sense of delight where I find comfort knowing that I can make a difference. I am a family-oriented person. My personnel is included as a part of the family. I show respect to my peers and in return, respect is given. I find joy in being fair to everyone. My strong will has driven me to inherit a successful work ethic by showing up for work an hour early every day. This practice has given me the extra time needed to prepare for our tour of duty. During the beginning of this module, I felt that I am already Magnus.

    During this module, I began to realize that I still have flaws that need work. I can sometimes be judgmental. I get frustrated by what someone says or does when I must repeat myself continuously. I tend to stop listening and may even utter something that I may regret later. I have also made careless mistakes that I care to remember.

    After looking at myself, I have some things that I need to work on going forward in my quest to becoming Magnus

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    Lt. Marlon J Shuff

    In this lecture, Lt. Hoina described Magnanimous Officers as "warriors with guardian hearts guided by the pursuit of virtue, which is the source of their strength." I wholeheartedly agree with this statement. I have always believed that police officers should be warriors and have a warrior mindset. If involved in a violent encounter, police officers should have a warrior mentality that drives them to fight and prevail over a violent suspect. As warriors, this means that we must have a capacity for violence. But, we must also maintain a "guardian heart," as described by Lt. Hoina. As police officers, we should embrace our role as guardians and summon the warrior within us when the situation arises.

    Marlon Shuff

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    Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

    In the lecture on Magnus Behaviors, Lt. Hoina lists them as Observe, Listen, Learn, and Act. I realized if you really worked on those things, you would not only greatly improve yourself as a leader, but also in every aspect of your life. I feel these behaviors help immensely on your journey to be a Magnus Leader

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    Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

    Jessica I very much enjoy listening to lecture on leadership. I started my career with the mindset that individuals are
    Troxclair born leaders. It was a statement I heard through my adolescent years. I immediately respected and followed
    all of my supervisors directions, just as I was taught in my family unit.

    Once I began leadership training my mindset and career changed. Although I feel a position of leadership is not
    for everyone, there are different styles of leadership. Becoming a Magnus Leader encompasses all of the
    greatest qualities an individual can display. The biggest attribute someone can hold is understanding themselves
    first, learning more about themselves daily and pursuing goals they set to achieve. Becoming the best version of
    oneself allows you to open up yourself and truly help others grow into the leadership role in the future.

    The qualities of a Magnus Leader i feel I possess strongly are being humble, fair and accountable. I need to
    improve on action; i listen and process longer when the end result is the same.

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      Cynthia Estrup

      I agree with your comment about self reflection, I would imagine this course is going to allow for a lot of that. As we continue to focus our minds and thoughts about who we are as professionals and why we continue to do what we do, I look forward to having both inner and outer dialogue.

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    Jacqueline Dahms

    Magnanimous leaders have stepped in and out of my career throughout my life. I have been able to identify those leaders who have the virtues or qualities that I wanted to emulate. I was raised with the mindset a job worth doing is worth doing well and in a lot of ways this includes many virtues of MAGNUS. I have also caught myself in the middle of the night, in the middle of the shift, when no one is looking, thinking of the easy road but always doing the right thing because I would know I took the shortcut. I also know that I tend to slip with virtues like respect when emotions are high. My belief is that if one already embodies the virtues of MAGNUS then it is possible to improve on them. It seems all the MAGNUS virtues all tie into each other and without one you can't have the other. This was a good module for self reflection.

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      Robert Schei

      I enjoyed your post and would and would argue that you defined in part your humanity. We certainly all have self doubt at times but the greatness in all of us cries out for self improvement and dedication to our cause. I am self reflective in nature and although this lesson plan is geared toward a MAGNUS Officer I would argue that greatness should be looked for in each aspect of our lives.

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    Major Willie Stewart

    After finishing the lecture, it left me feeling that we as officers are great individuals for choosing this path of service. We know everyone makes mistakes and we are not different, but there are some who make the right decisions regardless of who is watching and if there is no recognition given for that decision. I think Magnus is being great at all times in how you treat and lead others in todays' world regardless of the sacrifice.

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    I really enjoyed this presentation. It was what I had hoped for when I signed up for the National Command Academy. The section on MAGNUS behaviors (Observe, listen, learn and act) really resonated with me. Observing the situation and listening (with an unbiased eye and ear) go hand in hand and are key to figuring out the difference be fact and perception. When you are armed with all the facts you are able to act confidently and demonstrate a committed response. These behaviors seem simple but when practiced, serve a leader well because they are applicable when dealing with the command level policy issues (COVID Transports) or personnel issues. The key, is continuous demonstration of these behaviors. You cannot just do it once or every now and then. last but not least, is learning. This is a continuous process. my commitment to personal learning is why I am here. I struggled to find a course of instruction that went beyond "how to" do something and focused more on why/ when to do something. So Far, I have not been disappointed.

    Dave G

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    Cynthia Estrup

    As I listened to the lesson, it brought me back to the first time I lifted my right hand and took my oath of office over 20 years ago. Remembering a time where there was virtue and Police Officers took the oath as a life choice and not as a job. I look forward to continuing on this journey as we both learn and live the Magnanimous way to serve our community and the oath of office. In a time where there is so much distrust of the police, we need to find a way to provide order and build our communities back up for the better.

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      I agree. Taking the oath and pinning on the badge are huge symbols of our occupation and its rich history. It is far more than a just a job. They are essential to maintaining our culture and keeping alive all those that have come before us. Many have fallen so that others may live.

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      Eric Sathers

      I believe the world has changed; our younger generations act and think differently. This can be seen in our younger officers (who value individualism more than supporting the group) as well as in our communities, which have seen greatly deteriorated respect for authority. I agree that it is our responsibility to build our communities back up for the better. Acting and living magnanimously is an excellent way to begin that process.

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      Adam Kronstedt

      Building back that trust, bringing order, and bettering our communities can only be done by the Magnus officers. Thanks for taking that path, and helping those in your sphere of influence to do the same.

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    Eric Sathers

    While I hadn't heard the term "MAGNUS officer" before this module, it turns out I was already familiar with the idea. It is the same reason most of us got into law enforcement in the first place; to serve our communities, to help others, to make a difference and to protect the vulnerable. The idea of magnanimity is rooted in foundational beliefs across the world, commonly seen in religion and core societal institutions.

    In order to do the important tasks which called us to this profession, we need to undertake a lifelong journey, which will not be easy or come quickly. The idea of being a MAGNUS officer is complex and difficult and the virtues embodied are not easily attained or maintained. We are all human and subject to flaws and temptations. Becoming and staying magnanimous will take a life of deliberate and constant attention to remain virtuous. The rewards however can be great.

    This first module has been an eye opener for what this course will contain and I am very excited to begin my journey. I think now more than ever our profession needs to do some self reflection; we need to go back to foundational principals which will help us improve the communities we serve. Every one of us is responsible for moving police work forward. As a MAGNUS officer I will work to be a leader and set an example for others to follow. I will seek greatness in myself, my co-workers and my organization.

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    Maja Donohue

    Although leadership can have many definitions, the lecture defined virtuous deeds and beliefs as building blocks of a MAGNUS officer. Leadership was described as a lifelong commitment and a daily investment into improving one’s character. Since good character does not develop by accident and personal growth is not always easy, effective leaders must be resilient, humble, patient and motivated to take on today’s challenges. This module reminded me of why I joined this profession and why I stayed after so many years. When you work in a negative environment everyday it is easy to lose focus and forget who you are and who you want to be. But the fact is, we are in control of how we view the world and how we approach and interact with it. We are responsible for our own character development and this module is a powerful reminder that we are human and that we can change.

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      Samantha Reps

      Agreed. We are in a world today that it is easy to turn our heads to todays challenges. I liked your comment that good character doesn't develop by accident and personal growth isn't always easy. This lesson was a great reminder.

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    Sergeant Durand Ackman

    This was a great reminder for me. I have taken other courses and had several conversations about the virtues discussed here. Some of these I do well and come naturally to me. I have improved my abilities with some of the virtues over the years and other virtues still require me to devote more time and effort to improve. Great reminder that becoming Magnus is an ongoing, ever evolving process. Each one of us have areas we excel and areas that need some work. Sometimes it is very easy to focus on what comes easy and/or naturally to us. But if we continue to do that, we will not improve ourselves. It is easy to forget that improving ourselves also improves our organization and is a great way to role model to others the importance of always looking for ways to improve.

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      Adam Kronstedt

      That is a great point about focusing on what we already do well. If we would take more time to focus on the things where we need growth, that is exactly what would happen. Growth, development, and improvement.

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    Robert Schei

    The whole concept of being MAGNUS can be overwhelming. Being great at anything requires a whole lot of dedication and effort. I believe that greatness is achieved in the little things, the habits that we create and repeat day in a day out. Looking at this concept and trying to identify whether you are a MAGNUS officer or not certainly provides a glimpse of our own humility. I prefer to think of myself as a constant work in progress, always trying to improve but recognizing my own failures while not judging others to harshly. I agree with the 4 behaviors of the MAGNUS Officer; observe, listen, learn and act and certainly have experienced in my own career that practicing does equal improvement and in some regards a level of greatness.

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    Kyle Phillips

    The characteristics of a MAGNUS LEO mentioned in the lecture, remind me of the qualities that I remember seeing in LEO's growing up, and the LEO I envisioned of myself when I made the decision to become an Officer. Some of these characteristics have required more effort than others that came more naturally. I think the four behaviors of MAGNUS LEO should be used as a fundamental to decision making on a daily basis weather on a call or a tough situation at home or work. becoming MAGNUS requires continual self reflection and awareness, humility, hard work and support. As it was stated in the lecture, the journey to becoming MAGNUS never ends so we as LEO's must continue to hold ourselves accountable to strive to represent the MAGNUS LEO characteristics everyday.

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    Adam Kronstedt

    We've all heard the phrase "sore loser", but there is the equally bad attitude of a "boastful winner". After viewing this lecture, my mind's eye is seeing the magnus officer as the "good winner", the one who doesn't pump a fist in the air, do an end-zone dance, or trash talk their losing opponent. The "good winner" stays humble, helps the opponent up after knocking them down, and offers encouraging words to the defeated team.
    The same is true for the magnus officer. They treat even the most difficult of arrestees with respect, they take care of business and handle problems accordingly, but they do so in the most professional and respectful manner possible.

    I guess the biggest takeaway I got out of this lesson was humility. Not only was I humbled by it, but I know have much room to improve daily on staying humble.

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      Eduardo Palomares

      Hello Adam. You made a great point about the Magnus officer being a good winner. Winning honorably and respecting an opponent on their defeat shows great character. I really liked what you said about being a "good winner" who stays humble and helps the opponent. In our profession we generally see the worst and people but it is important to treat them with dignity, respect and tact. I also have a lot to improve on in terms of staying humble. Great post!

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    Eduardo Palomares

    This lecture opened my eyes and definitely gave me a broader perspective of the characteristics of a MAGNUS Officer. Treating people with respect and dignity even in the most difficult situations is important. MAGNUS Officers are exemplary and strive to become better. They don't settle for less than excellence. They are service oriented and maintain a balance between their personal and professional lifes. They do the right thing because they believe in helping people and don't use good deeds or actions for self-promoting. It is not easy to be a MAGNUS Officer. In fact, it could be quite difficult. Currently, my best friend, who is a true MAGNUS officer is going through a very difficult time in her personal and professional life. Despite this, she reminds me through her actions of speaking of good deeds that a difficult time is only temporary. Being MAGNUS is forever! Although management has not displayed the best interest in her, she continuously displays fairness, strength, wisdom and prudence. It is not a coincidence that I joined this program and the first lesson is on this topic. This friend that I am talking about is my wife. She is an officer for another agency. She encouraged me to join this program. I make the pledge of being remarkable and will strive to improve on observing, listening, learning and acting in order to be MAGNUS!

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    Samantha Reps

    Magus concept is a powerful reminder as to why I started this profession (and why I wanted to be in the military) and what it takes to continue to be successful. Magus concept being described as the pursuit of moral goodness which is something that we were all expected to achieve while growing up, but it challenges you to constantly do more and continue to attain higher education and trainings. Magnus officers are challenged daily in todays society and wanting to get more tools to do better is on ourselves. The phrase "enjoy the road that is traveled by few" caught my attention as it can relate to your personal and professional life with the choices you make. In the podcast the comment was made about asking someone to hold you accountable and I think it is something that I can benefit from.

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      Andy Opperman

      I liked you last sentence related to needing someone to hold me accountable. I have felt like at times in my career that was I looking for feedback. You question am I doing whats expected, am I doing a good job of whats expected? I can remember being a Supervisor in areas of our department and thinking I am operating at a high speed, but was I. Should someone have held me accountable. I knew I was accomplishing everything I wanted to, but I didn't feel like the expectations were set or the feedback was given enough. Evaluations are a good example. We see officers in such a short clip of time on a call or meeting. We become so busy in our own job descriptions that when we sit down with our officers for an annual eval, I just don't feel its always very constructive. We haven't been there to give enough feedback.

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    Andy Opperman

    I look at my environment, and I try to assess where we are as a profession and what the path towards development of a Magnanimous Officer is. I work for a medium sized department of just under 200 officers. I look back at my 16 years and I can identify many of the officers that I have worked with who I believe lived these virtues. I also know over time though, that I have reshaped my opinions and re-evaluated my views of certain co-workers. When you start as an officer you see a lot of people in leadership positions and people who you wish to emulate in your career. You also see some you do not believe are Magnus. As time moves on you start to realize that some of those people or co-workers are not who you thought they were and realize that they are human. They are full of mistakes like most of us, some with decision making that for the likes of yourself, you can’t understand. I question, are these officers or administrators Magnanimous? I believe many had several of the virtues, but was it enough? I believe we are at a turning point in policing, where these virtues discussed during the lecture must be instilled and forged in our future officers or as a profession we will not succeed. We have already experienced massive change in our profession just in the last 16 years since I started. When I started it was better as a new officer to be seen and not heard. You had to earn your voice. Seniority played a major role in our department function. Our department was ahead of the game when it came to a community policing philosophy, but our patrol division and community police division were still separate entities with not enough cohesion. I felt then as I do now that officers joined the force because they wanted to do good, they wanted to help, they also had certain values instilled in them like Honor, Courage, Duty, but it was more of a warrior mentality. Good must win out and prevail over Evil! While I believe this is still true today, I would acknowledge that the view of what is evil had changed a lot, and that we are turning to policing in a guardian mindset. Today in policing, there is more of an effort in acknowledging and dealing with mental health, new techniques to use with the hope of avoiding using force on someone with in crisis. This knowledge has developed from learning that much our society has struggles with mental health, and that it’s not just and alcohol problem, it’s probably related to mental health and that it’s not just a drug problem, that the drug and alcohol problems are just coping mechanisms for mental health struggles. In policing we are training officers how to recognize symptoms and how to respond to people struggling with mental health and not just put a band aid on the situation. We are looking for long term solutions, so the person in question does not become a revolving door in the system. These are no doubt Magnus actions by our departments and officers.
    I believe as a profession we are becoming Magnus, as training and hiring evolves, the amount of training and type given continues to rise. The amount with which we scrutinize our applicants has become immense. I do not believe we teach enough leadership training at the ground level. Leadership training is provided most of the time when we promote somebody. Most officers come to the career with a sense of Honor, Nobility, Responsibility, but to strengthen that moral compass and grow, that officer needs to start learning leadership early and continuous. Police officers all want to confront crime, and I think we start our careers with compassion, but I asked myself after looking at my notes, do we have compassion in our later years as police officers. I will argue because of conditioning of our job we lose a lot of compassion. How do we keep that? How do we free ourselves and other officers from the bitterness we see develop in police officers over time? How do we as leaders free our people from that bitterness? A lot of that can be accomplished by Magnus Behaviors related to learning. As people we should constantly be learning and trying new things. I know that when I start reading a new book, that I really like, I finish reading it quickly and look to jump right into another book. In learning, the human psyche seems to have the need to want more training, more learning as you begin to become a better more educated person. Slowly acting on ways to improve yourself can really multiply over time. We are not perfect beings, but we can improve our lives immensely by striving to live in a Magnus way. I believe there is reward in Magnus work. I have watched the effort our current Chief has put into meeting with all groups and community leaders across the city. It’s a lot, but it really makes the citizens feel they have say in the development of their community. The effort shown by leadership, trickles down and intern the reward has been when other areas of the country are really struggling with violent protest, our community shows more support. I also believe that behind many of our officer’s struggles in their career was a supervisor that contributed to it. We teach to be Magnus in policing, but we need to embed it into our cultures in our leadership within our departments and our officer’s lives, not just when they attend training or respond to a call.

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      Great point on early leadership Andy. From day one of this job we are looked at and expected to be leaders by the communities we serve. Having some basic fundamentals early on would go along way to bridging the gap between community and law enforcement.

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      Your points on training are spot on Andy. As I approach my 23rd year in this profession and reflect, never has our training been more honed and diverse as it is today. The sad thing is that mental health drives so much of what our call loads are and the increase in mental health has only gotten worse. The downside to putting the burden almost squarely onto our shoulders is we aren't as equipped to navigate those in a crisis as some other professionals. I think we'll see a shift in how we as law enforcement handle these increased episodes in the future.

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    We all start out this career with an idea of who we are and what we want to become. Those ideals we have are all positive because it was a simpler time. Over the years this job has a way of steering you off that course. My favorite quote is "Work hard, stay humble" because hard work inevitably comes with success. That success is another reason you may steer from your original path. Helping others and fostering relationships is not easy when you lose focus of the bigger picture. Strive to be a successful and humble person. Remembering that there was a time when you were helped along the way and a time may come when you need that help again is important.

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    I took away a few good concepts in the video lecture as well as the podcast. To be great, Magnus, is to be well rounded and diverse not just in our technical skills and knowledge but our way of life. In our business life, we need to set the tone for those around us peers, subordinates, and superiors all take note of what we bring to the table every day. Every day we bring the weather with us, is it good or is it bad? In my experience, the more we study leadership and become well versed the better the example we set and live out this greatness the video lecturer spoke about. With that said, we obviously are human beings and often we will fail. The overarching guidance to me is that when we fail, we get back up and learn from our failure, we strive to improve. One of the biggest takeaways for me was we must be humble. Humility encompasses many aspects such as integrity, ethics, intelligence, and so forth. Arguably without humility, we cannot become Magnus leaders.

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      Brad Strouf

      Andy,

      I agree wholeheartedly with your final thoughts in your discussion submission. Humility is usually mentioned when one begins listing the characteristics of a "good" leader, but it is typically not one of the first things mentioned.

      Yet, when I think back on my nearly thirty years of policing, the best leaders always demonstrated a certain degree of humbleness. Those leaders were the approachable leaders. While all of the virtues discussed in the lecture are critical to becoming Magnus leaders, I would always lean towards humility as being one of the most important.

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    Brad Strouf

    Virtues of Magnanimous Officers

    As I read and listened to the material provided in this module, I was struck by the simplicity (yet importance) of the theory of “Magnanimous Officers” and the traits and habits associated with this theory.

    As I listened to the lecture, I noted several traits mentioned, and many that were repeated:
    • Honesty
    • Integrity
    • Honor
    • Nobility
    • Humility
    • Content with position
    • Faithful/ obedient
    • Loyal to superiors
    • Respect
    • Responsibility
    • Prudence
    • Gratitude
    • Dedicated to success

    Most of these characteristics would seem to be obvious, positive traits that we should strive to hold dear.
    It became apparent to me that the learning in this module focused on what standards “leaders” need to hold themselves to and how this self-learning and internal focus will make us better as leaders and provide us with the ability to channel these characteristics and use them to mentor subordinates.

    The frustration in channeling this energy to subordinates is real, however. While the characteristics and traits are obviously positive for officers, there are real challenges presented to us with low morale, bad attitudes and frustrated employees. Regardless of the difficulties with imposing these lessons, we must maintain diligent efforts to incorporate these values into everyday learning/ teaching.

    By living as Magnanimous Officers, we set the example. As mentioned in the lecture, “becoming Magnus is a process. The journey never ends”.

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      Hi Brad,

      I think the quote you used at the end is the biggest lesson that I took away from the lecture. I agree that all of the traits of a Magnanimous Officer seem pretty obvious but I didn't really look at it as being a process until I listened to this. I believe that it is something that one will always have to work towards and there really is no end or ultimate goal. It is something that one will have to make a conscious effort when making decisions and using good judgement based off of experience, morals, and ethics. Another important piece to that is making sure you use those same characteristics in personal lives and not just at work. Just because the uniform is off doesn't mean that character and behavior should change. In this line of work, officers are always in the spotlight no matter where they are or what they are doing. That should never be forgotten because a lot of people are unfortunately always looking for law enforcement to make a mistake.

      Great post, and I really like some of the things that you emphasized.

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    Christopher Lowrie

    This was a great start to the curriculum and a reminder that all of us need to aspire to be Magnus Officers. Every officer has attended a training or spoke to someone who refocuses their approach to policing. Hopefully the refocus is more of a compass alignment back to true north than a concentration on the negative. This module stressed a commitment to do better. By focusing on the ones who fill your sails versus the ones who poke holes in your sails will help in a virtuous journey. Being a Magnus Officer takes this one step further by not allowing another to negative influence your path but stopping and taking the time to try and better the negative person.

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      Keith Fratzke

      Chris, I agree wholeheartedly! Sometimes it is easier to walk away from the negative person and not engage. But at the end of the day that is our goal; set or attempt to set moral compasses north. As Brad said in the previous post, the negativity and bad attitudes from subordinates is real. It is our obligation to teach them and help them learn.

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      It's very easy to agree with you Chris. Negativity seems contagious and very much so as of late. People are eager to seek approval from others and supporting the positive ones, you can potentially and gradually phase out the naysayers. I am just getting started with the program, which like you said, has refocused my goals. It seems easier when I hear someone speak negative about a situation to point out the positive.

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    Keith Fratzke

    This was absolutely refreshing and a reminder that regardless of how many years one has in this profession, one should constantly be evaluating oneself and asking the important questions; what are MY faults, how am I improving on these faults, and am I being virtuous. The self evaluation needs to be constant and leads to acknowledging the negativities then discarding them for the benefit of the whole. After all, we represent more than ourselves. Being a Magnus Officer is the synergy of all the virtues. It is almost too simple to look at the qualities spoken here and not shine in our performance.

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    The information in this first module laid out a good foundation of what I would expect to gain from the program. For me it builds on other leadership courses and life lessons, but also simplifies ways to seek out a greater outlook for life in general. Expanding on the continuous professional study and practice of virtuous living. The discussions express the need for good moral character, a desire to achieve more and to determine your true purpose for being in the profession.

    Like most, I feel we are constantly recruiting and hiring to get back to full staff. I’ve heard applicants give different reason for getting into this profession other than true public service. As mentioned in several posts, our best officers have been ones with the burning desire to make a difference through law enforcement. They seem to be the ones that jump on board with the mission and assert a positive image throughout their career. These have been the easy ones to grow, but it has been challenging finding younger people with that mindset.

    The lecture did make me ask myself if I was doing enough for the ones who are floating around and simply performing on an average level. What am I doing to bring them up and the same for their immediate supervisor? I hope to gain a better ability to persuade or inspire those who lost their path along the way and to get the “buy in” from those who feel this is just a job (get through their 8 and go home). Help them find their purpose and reinvest into their/our future.

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    The lecture really drove home the philosophy that Magnus ideals are an all-encompassing group of virtues that SHOULD be displayed in every facet of our lives. We can’t be truly committed to any set of ideals if we are not prepared to live out those ideals in our work life, social life, home life, and personal life. I knew a preacher that used to say, “If I profess to be a Christian in the town square, would there be enough evidence in my home to convict me of that allegation”? Does what’s on my inside match what’s on my outside?

    I know many cops that set wonderful examples, are brilliant leaders, and selfless servants while at work. Sadly, their personal, social, financial, etc.; lives are an absolute train wreck. When their subordinates see this, the leader loses his/her ability to influence and lead. It’s like as soon as the gun belt comes off, the Magnus ideals come off too. The lecture reminded me that if we desire to be a Magnus officer we must put Magnus principles into action every day, and in all aspects of our lives.

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    Gregory Hutchins

    The module on magnanimous virtues as the stage setter for the course was enlightening. The information presented fostered the need for self-reflection to benefit from this course of instruction. The requirement for self-reflection is the key takeaway of the lesson as this internal skill is essential in the personal development for one to be indeed magnanimous.

    A magnanimous officer is the only acceptable standard for a dedicated law enforcement professional, with the myriad of specific and unique empowerments entitled and granted by society in order protect and serve the community, such to take lives for the protection of others and seize property, the virtuous standards of self-control, prudence, humility, and gratitude serve as the cornerstones of our primary characteristics. These defined standards of being magnanimous are high, as are the requirements placed upon all law enforcement officers through their journey in this profession.

    The journey within this profession is continually changing, and as a result, the true professional needs to embrace change as well. Business practices of yesterday will not support one’s success in today’s operating environment. Through numerous changes such as promotions, duty assignments, and most importantly, life changes, the driving focus towards living a virtuous life is continually a challenge. Knowing and understanding change is constant. Therefore, one needs to be a lifelong learner, always seeking to expand one’s knowledge base of skills, abilities, and capabilities.

    As an individual seeking to better oneself through following the appropriate behaviors of observing, listen, learn, and act one embodies these best characteristics of the magnanimous officer. The resiliency and adaptability learned through lifelong and formal education will enable the officer to succeed in the pursuit of the guardian heart, committed to making a difference, not only in one’s professional life but one’s private life. An individual with a guardian's heart only leads with a guardian mind, or magnanimous mind, which solely derives from learning supported by self-awareness.

    Hoina, C. (2017). Virtues of magnanimous officers. Learning area 1, Module 1. National Command and Staff College.

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    During the lecture I found all aspects to be very interesting. However, the biggest piece that stuck out to me was the fact that being a MAGNUS officer has to do with everything that officer does in their life and not just at work. Their character, ethics, and actions are always in the spotlight. Some people may see the officer out in public any know what they do for work. I feel as if officers are held at a higher standard because of the jobs that they do. An officer’s morals, behavior, and choices should not be any different off duty than when one is on duty.

    I also feel as if being a MAGNUS officer is always going to be a process or a goal that you are working towards. There is always a way to improve or to keep progressing whether it is in their personal life out in the community or dealing with the public or inmates at work. Being professional and making good decisions by using sound judgement is something that isn’t always easy. Every decision that must be made in this line of work is always going to be based off different circumstances because no two situations are exactly the same. That is what keeps this line of work so interesting. Those sound decisions shouldn’t change when not working.

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      Bou Gazley

      I appreciate you calling out that a MAGNUS officers is not just something you do while at work, but it is something that is a part of their personal life as well. I do not feel that a person can be successful by leading two different lives, one of character while at work and something else when they are not. You should strive to be MAGNUS in all that you do. While you may fail from time to time, it needs to be the goal. I also feel that officers are at a higher standard than the general public. I also like your comments on always looking for ways to improve.

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      Travis Linskens

      Kari, I enjoyed reading your response and I couldn't agree with you more. Being MAGNUS goes beyond the badge and far into our personal lives. Like many others, I can think of examples of when an officer does an exceptional job in the field, but off duty doesn't follow the same set of virtues. It seems to always sneak up on them at one point or another and their behavior off duty begins to be apparent on the job.

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    Bou Gazley

    This session exhibited what a MAGNUS Officer is, but I would argue that every officer should exhibit these characteristics. Every officer should be MAGNUS! MANGUS Officers are action oriented, fair, and professional in everyway. Fair and impartial should be the backbone of police work. While there are always instances of officers who do not live up to this standard, this is paramount in order to gain and maintain the trust of the community. Officers should be action oriented. We do not go to work just for the paycheck. We all got into this profession to help others and our communities. Some of the other traits of a MAGNUS Officer may not be shared by all officers, but are certainly something to strive for: truthfulness, integrity, honor, nobility, humility, content with position/compensation/status, faithfulness, respect, responsibility, prudence, and gratitude. I have worked with many officers who exhibit many of these qualities, but regretfully, I have also worked with some officers who have no desire to have some of these qualities. Lastly, this statement is something that I will always try to remember, "Warriors with guardian hearts, guided by the pursuit of virtual, which is the source of their strength." I think this sums up a MAGNUS Officer very well.

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    Sergeant Michael Prachel

    Though the term, “MAGNUS,” associated with Law Enforcement is somewhat new to me, I couldn’t help but think that these traits and characteristics have been the foundation and backbone of what I strive to do on a daily basis. I believe this topic should be taught to officers at the recruit level, but also be a refresher topic to even the most experienced officers. Too often some in the profession of Law Enforcement are blinded by only being good at the “technicalities”. It was refreshing to hear in the module that being well-rounded in police tactics is necessary, but having MAGNUS virtues will improve you as a professional.
    Truthfulness, integrity, honor, nobility, and humility are all mentioned as qualities the MAGNUS officer will embrace. I believe “humility” is a concept that we, as a Law Enforcement profession, sometimes lose as we gain years of experience. Being humble and modest does not show weakness; it can show professionalism and your ability to help others achieve and advance. As a Field Training Officer and Instructor, showing humility can help better new officers and push them in a positive direction. If a veteran officer is there to brag and gloat about their accomplishments, it will not benefit the team. Showing gratitude and being able to express gratefulness to those who helped them achieve so much shows maturity, and can support them in being a mentor.
    Additionally, the four behaviors of a MAGNUS officer are a strong base for our profession, on and off duty. Observe, listen, learn, and act, all go together quite well, and if we fail to use one or more of these behaviors, we may miss something in our professional careers or life at home. By encompassing all of these behaviors, it will only make us succeed in becoming MAGNUS.

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      Sgt. Samantha Koscher

      I agree with you on how some officers are blinded by only being good at the "technicalities". Even officers who excel in their position have room for improvement and if they adopt a MAGNUS mindset, they have the potential to make others around them better. As you mentioned, humility and gratitude I think have a lot to play in how well an officer supports and helps develop their fellow officer.

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        Marshall Carmouche

        Well stated, Sgt. Koscher! We all indeed have room for improvement, regardless of rank, longevity or assignment. i believe a leader is one who wants to see others succeed, one who wants future leaders to strive reach their goals. I do my absolute very best to build, encourage and challenge those around me to be better. We can be our best working as a team.

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    Sgt. Samantha Koscher

    While completing this module, I was reminded of the officers and other role models I am fortunate enough to have in my life. The individuals I look up to and have tried to emulate exhibit what it means to be a MAGNUS officer. I believe that is what distinguished them from others and why they left a lasting impact on my life. They have achieved goals and built a legacy of respect, improvement, and progress as referenced in the "Guardian Hearts of MAGNUS" section in the lecture. MAGNUS officers strive to display virtues such as humility, integrity, responsibility, honor, faithfulness, and gratitude in everything they do.

    One of the biggest take always for me on this module was learning that becoming MAGNUS is a never ending journey. A MAGNUS officer focuses on making improvements, bettering themselves, and making those around them better. As a supervisor, I can see the importance of setting a standard of MAGNUS for my self, and supporting others to become Magnanimous in their life.

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      Sgt. Shawn Wilson

      “You can try and make people learn or read more, get better at studying their profession,” Mullen said. “But that generally doesn’t work all that well. What works much better is personal inspiration, the understanding the why, and getting after it as a personal mission to get better and get smarter.”

      Sgt. Koscher I am a firm believer in that being MAGNUS is a never ending journey. I have attached a quote from Maj. Gen William Mullen on the importance of education and continuing to improve. Being MAGNUS is contagious.

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      Timothy Sandlin

      I agree that this module definitely touches on the importance of adopting a lifetime of learning attitude. The best way to get officers to "buy in" to this attitude toward learning, growing, and self-reflection is for their leadership to demonstrate it through their actions.

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    The Magnus officer is and individual who is a well balanced individual in their personal life as well as there professional life. The time that is devoted in becoming the best law enforcement professional possible, should be also devoted in becoming the best person they can be away from work. I have told younger officers and deputies that we have to be cognizant of how we carry ourselves when we are away from work. Due to the fact that public may see us at work and create their opinions of how we are as a professional by how we act away from work. We have to hold ourselves to a higher standard, because we are being held to that standard by the public. A Magnus law enforcement professional must have and show integrity at all times on and off duty because we never know who is watching. The officers or deputies that are not Magnus material are the ones giving the officers or deputies the bad name during these trying times.

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      Ronald Smith

      Troy,
      For my entire career in law enforcement I have been told we must hold ourselves to a higher standard. I did not have an issue with this concept since I was 38 when I started this career, I had time to mature and see a lot of the world before settling down to a career. I have done my best to influence others to act as I do but without my experiences 20-25 year old people still enter our line of work for the excitement and or prestige of wearing the badge. Budget constraints prevent some agencies from pursuing courses like this where a concept like being a Magnanimous person, who is a police officer, could save an told fortune in legal fees and prevent the loss of perspective and or life of a police officer.

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    Sgt. Shawn Wilson

    I agree with several of the above posts that a MAGNUS officer not only adheres to the core fundamentals of truthfulness, integrity, honor, nobility, and humility while at work but also in their daily lives not because someone may be watching but because it is the right thing to do. To build a legacy of leadership an officer must be MAGNUS in all that they do. Instilling a MAGNUS way of life in those that we lead will lead to great organizational success and the opposite is also true. If we fail as MAGNUS leaders the organization will incur loss and dysfunction over time. I believe a MAGNUS way of life is a quest or a continual assessment of not only ourselves, but have we instilled these ideals in those we are tasked with leading. When we have embraced a MAGNUS life and instilled those ideals within an organization there is no ceiling to how great the organization can be.

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      I think you make an incredibly important point in that being MAGNUS is not only when people are looking, but when they are not. You often see individuals who present a starkly different image and persona when working, when they are not. In policing, this is not practical nor is it a way to earn the communities trust and live a magnanimous lifestyle. As police officers, we must hold ourselves to a higher standard, as the community surely does.

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        Matthew Menard

        This has never been more true than it is in today's climate. Although law enforcement by and large does everything right and with the community in mind, we find ourselves scrutinized more than ever. Because of this scrutiny we must work even more towards being Magnus.

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        Major Willie Stewart

        I agree with Sgt Decker in working in this profession we are entrusted with enforcing laws and it would be very to hard to enforce these laws if your are not living a law abiding life away from your job.

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    I think one of first things that caught my attention in this lesson occurred within the first few minutes of the lesson when it defined a person with a great mind as one that distains injustice and meanness even though it means sacrifice of personal ease, interest, and safety to accomplish noble objectives. As a police officers, we exhibit these traits not only throughout our career but in our day-to-day lives.

    Working undesirable shifts such as nights, weekends, or holidays are a common occurrence that we endure to provide the noble objective of keeping our community safe. These everyday sacrifices are often overlooked or minimized as they become routine and simply a part of who we are. As police officers, we often look for these larger examples of sacrifice, threats to our safety, or other personal sacrifices to validate our efforts or demonstrate our distain for meanness or injustice. I would argue that a career of these sacrifices is a monumental demonstration, and in my opinion, equivalent or greater than a single demonstration or event.

    I think to be a true magnanimous officer it requires times and dedication, not a singular event. This is how police officers’ effect positive change in their community and become trusted within it; and seen as the guardian they are. As noted in the lecture, the more you practice the better you are at the task at hand. The more we try to exhibit the virtues of a magnanimous officer, the easier it will become and we will get better at it.

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    Matthew Menard

    Thinking back to the period of my career when I would field train most every deputy we hired, I found that the discussion of why they chose to become a law enforcement officer would always come up. We all have heard the canned answer of “I want to help people”, however this module reinforces that that response should be the basis of who we all are and why we are here. If we approach our jobs from the foundation that we are here for the community we serve, we will find it is simply not enough to be a good officer. We must strive every day to become a Magnus officer and build upon those traits which earn someone that title.

    This lesson does a great job at pointing out all the qualities that the community should expect and deserve from those who protect them. It also serves as a good reminder of needing to take time to self-reflect on personal values and what matters most.

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    Travis Linskens

    The vast majority of law enforcement agencies struggle with a generational gap amongst employees. It can be a struggle to develop a message that resonates with all employees the same way. I think the key point I took away is from the theme of the presentation. No matter what your experience level is or what walk of life you come from, you can be influenced by someone holding themselves to a higher standard. This is a good reminder as leaders we need to walk the walk instead of talking the talk. It's easy for someone to tell others how to be MAGNUS, but encouraging someone to be MAGNUS comes through striving to be it ourselves.

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    Timothy Sandlin

    In reviewing the material in this section, I found myself excited again about the profession. The very defining of MAGNUS and describing the virtues, as well as the characteristics of such an officer it all seems to click. It brought back what I felt personally when first beginning my career. While serving in leadership positions, it has been my experience that a well-rounded officer is an extremely valuable and appreciated asset. The MAGNUS officer is most definitely a force multiplier.

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      Brent Olson

      I had the same feeling when listening to the video in this section! It was a very poignant reminder of why I am doing this job, why I went into this profession, and why I still love what I do every day (16) years later.

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    Marshall Carmouche

    The virtues of a magnanimous officer, as described in the lesson, are import, as these virtues truly define who a person is in respect to the profession of law enforcement. As a leader the responsibility and demand for me to have, hold and continually practice these virtues is significant. I believe a leader is one who strives to make others better. One who enjoys seeing and truly wants others to succeed. As a leader, i should build those up around me, encouraging them to always be better. I wish to always lead by example. As a leader, i should instill in others, who have the potential to be leaders, the virtues of a magnanimous officer. The magnanimous officer is one who is compassionate, understanding, forgiving, one who does not boast or gloat. The magnanimous office is one who is proud without excessive pride.

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      Kenneth Davis

      Marshall- I enjoyed reading your thoughts here. Definitely moving together with you on developing our colleagues and the importance of Magnus. We see so many changes on the horizon today that it tends to discourage some of our aspirants, both pre and post academy. In your current role, how do you see yourself mentoring newer officers in our field in the way of Magnus?

      Best and stay safe-

      Kenny

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    Ronald Smith

    Throughout my law enforcement career, I have been exposed to the various thoughts and concepts of being an exemplary officer, true guardian with the capabilities of a warrior, and even the idea of just being a warrior for the people. This is the first time the values of being virtuous, humble, and exemplary have been described with ancient rhetoric to create the Magnus officer. This career has taught me more about not reinventing the wheel and to look at history for lessons in behavior and it is not the first time my learning has reached all the back to Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. To strive to be Magnanimous is simply describing how to achieve happiness in life.

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      Lt. Zachary Roberts

      Hi Ronald -

      I as well have been exposed t different theories, thoughts and concepts of what an exemplary officer is and what they stand for. Your comparison to how being a MAGNUS Officer relates to the history of ancient Greek God's is absolutely spot on. I would also agree that being a MAGNUS Officer absolutely describes finding happiness in both your career and in your personal life.

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      Kenneth Davis

      Ronald- I concur. Happiness in life is synonymous with happiness at work and in your career goals. I, too, appreciate the way Magnus integrates the principles of credible leadership so that we may apply what we have learned with a measure of humility. My thoughts are that this helps in creating trust and transparency in our customer base as a whole. Its our foundation for success.

      Best and stay safe-

      Kenny

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    Lt. Zachary Roberts

    My biggest takeaway from the Virtues of a Magnanimous Officer, is that the ability to lead comes natural to someone who is a MAGNUS Officer. A MAGNUS Officer is someone who is looked up to within an organization. someone who possess the utmost integrity, honesty and are of high moral character. One of the things that stood out to me the most was that everyone who enters the profession of law enforcement can be a MAGNUS Officer. Whether it be a 20 year career veteran or someone who enters the career field with no experience. A MAGNUS Officer not only possesses these values while performing his or her job duties, but in every aspect of their life. Listening to this discussion helped me better understand why I set out to do what I do. It also helped me understand what I am looking to accomplish as a MAGNUS leader within my organization.

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    Major Willie Stewart

    I think that most who join law enforcement do so with the best of intensions and with the goal to be a Magnus Officer. Sometimes somewhere along the line some officers forget why they began this career. This section was a good reminder that we must continue to look at ourselves and make sure we are living up to those virtues. We must also help those we see that are forgetting to get back on the path to becoming a Magnus Officer.

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    Brent Olson

    I think the most important piece of this lesson was the desire and need to continuously strive for improvement. We all start with the servant mindset and the genuine desire to make a difference in the community we serve. We all know this profession can make it hard to maintain that mindset and desire you originally had. The things we see and deal with can easily make an officer become cynical or hardened and lose sight of why they are doing what they do. The never ending journey for continuous improvement as they said is "simple but not easy." It is simple to talk about and identify what needs to be done. It is definitely not easy to do! It requires a strong mindset every single day that keeps you on the course. I know within my agency there are some who have lost this mindset and I will be honest that I have not always kept it either. I will strive in my current position to be a positive model for what it means to be a MAGNUS officer to those I supervise and interact with daily.

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      Steve Mahoney

      I agree with you Brent. If we go through our career trying to get a little bit batter each day we will improve. I believe that there will be days that we struggle with that or even potentially take a step or two backwards, but as long as we strive to get better we will succeed.

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      Kaiana Knight

      I agree Brent! It’s very easy to lose sight and get caught up with negativity while in law enforcement. We all must have a strong mindset in order to grow and improve.

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      Thomas Martin

      I agree with you Brent. I see improvement being very close to the the word change. I'm sure most of us have heard that change is inevitable. Failure to change or improve will result in us failing to grow. This will hurt our people, our agencies and ourselves.

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    Kenneth Davis

    When tasked with assessing one’s own philosophy of leadership, it is clear that this process can be, at times equivocal (Phillips, 1992). In their work, Normore, Javidi, Anderson, Normand and Scott (2014) sagely illustrate the importance of understanding behavior consistent with the Magnus concepts. In doing so, the differentiation emerges of processes and behaviors that relate to building up to the pinnacle of action.

    Using the Magnus behaviors (Hoina, 2021) as a guide, it becomes clear that actions supporting credible leadership are exercised by individuals possessing morality, ethics, values and virtue (Normore et al., 2014). These are the fundamental building blocks of the Magnus concept that illustrate the importance of specific behaviors. These include observations, listening and learning culminating in action.

    Active listening can be viewed as an external measure that is learned and developed throughout time and relevant to certain experiences. Doing so ensures our customers’ voices are heard and expectations are understood to all parties within the spectrum of the need for action. This assists in the formation of action planning. Additionally, notes gathered during observations are helpful in formulating plans of action that deal with potential limitations or challenges that are sometimes encountered. Such also provides models for learning that are incorporated into problem solving and leadership applications.

    The continued journey of learning is a palpable tenet that defines the parameters of how one approaches problem solving. Problems, especially those in the leadership realm are constantly evolving. As a result, the Magnus behaviors climax with action on the part of leadership.

    Action can be many things, but what it can never be is successful without observation, listening and learning. Thus, the integration of these four behaviors clearly landmarks the fundamentals of leadership that brings about positive change, change that improves communities.

    This very course itself is designed to develop the skills set forth herein and embodies action as a desired result of these behaviors. Emerging leaders, continually honing the craft, must pursue positive change while illustrating these tenets in order to provide credible leadership.

    References

    Hoina, C. (2021). Virtues of magnanimous officers. Module 1, Week 1. National Command and Staff College.

    Normone, A.H., Javidi, M., Anderson, T., Normand, N., Scott, Sr., & Hoina, C. (2014). Moral compass for law enforcement professionals. Holly Springs, NC: International Academy of Public Safety Data.

    Phillips, D.T. (1992).Lincoln on leadership: Executive strategies for tough times. New York, NY: Grand Central Publishing.

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      Indeed, action cannot be successfully accomplished without listening and planning. I've seen many people take action on a subject when someone voices a solo or ill-versed concern. Action without thought, pre-planning, input, and observations often leads to the proverbial "knee-jerk" reaction. This is where listening is key. Hear the concerns. Hear the options. Hear the facts and not the emotions. Take the collective knowledge and make a defined and well-thought out plan. Action is great. But action without thought is usually a setup for disaster or future changes.

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    MAGNUS is not a new topic but is a very important topic, especially in a world where police officers are viewed with such critical eyes. The profession is scrutinized by outsiders who make assumptions as to how to effectively do this job. Yet, those outsiders, while negative and influenced by emotions, are viewing all law enforcement in light of the theory of being magnanimous. They expect more from those sworn to protect and serve. They expect virtue and moral characteristics to be exuded from the men and women proudly displaying the badge. And I agree and commend their expectations. Law enforcement personnel should set the standard for behaviors and actions that others should exemplify and follow. Yet, we are humans. We are fallible. Not all in this career want to be the best they can. Others strive, but continue to fall. The theories discussed in this module provide guidance for the masses and hopefully more and more of us fall in line with this ideal and collectively help those who aren’t on track either step up or step out.

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      Robert Vinson

      Brain I completely agree. I think the module did a good job of touching on the fact that the virtue and morals we need to display on the job are just as important to maintain off duty. The public eye is on us 24/7 and we all contribute to the reputation of the profession as a whole.

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    Steve Mahoney

    This module has caused me to reflect on both my police life and personal life over the past 20 years. I remember sitting in the interview process for my first police job. I said all the proper things about wanting to “serve and protect”, help citizen, make a difference in peoples lives, and leave people with a positive attitude about the police profession. I look at myself now and wonder if I have done that. That would have made me a Magnus officer. I can’t help but think of many examples where I have failed. None of us like to fail and it is extremely hard to admit and be honest with ourselves and others when we have these failures. The examples i am running through my head make me embarrassed. The quest to be Magnus is hard. None of us live in a bubble where there are no outside influences, both professionally and personally, that help shape and mold who we are as a supervisor, but more important as a person. We are human and will make mistakes. I realize that I will continue to make mistakes throughout the rest of my career. The key for me is to realize these mistakes and work to not repeat them. That is my struggle to become a Magnus supervisor. Back when I was in the recruit academy an instructor said the following to live by in your career, “If it feels good to say it, you probably shouldn’t” This quote has stuck with me my whole career and I believe is valuable to becoming a Magnus supervisor. This module has also given me another quote to live by. “Do the right thing” If I do that I will not fail as a father, husband, friend, co-worker or supervisor.

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      Jared Paul

      I did the same thing, Steve, and reflected in my career and personal life after this module. I like that you recognized that we are all human and make mistakes. As the module discussed, a Magnus officer also realizes that concept of human error. I think it is very important that you recognized that, and have identified specifics on how you can improve and learn from your mistakes. That to me is a trait of being Magnus. I like the quote that you were told while in the academy. I know of a few officers that can definitely benefit from this. I will have to start using it. Thank you.

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      I faced and thought about some of the same things you are mentioning. As Lt. Chris Hoina was speaking, the topics and qualities he was mentioning was hitting "home." The lecture had me thinking of my past experiences and actions; were my actions pure or motivated? Did I represent my agency, family, and myself in a professional and respectful way? Didi I make impartial decisions; when asked of myself?

      I think as young officers we have the mindset that we can save the world. Young officers don't think about "tomorrow." They live in the present and for the notoriety. I thing if every officer (young) listens to this lecture, I strongly believe it will change their mindset. I feel if I would've had the opportunity to hear this lecture, I wouldn't doubt my actions from the past.

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    Jared Paul

    I am grateful for covering the material in this module. The term Magnanimous is new to me, and this is the first exposure I have had to this content. I believe that Lt. Chris Hoina did a great job not just defining what a Magnus officer is, but also explaining the characteristics, beliefs and virtues of a Magnus officer. As the leaders in our organizations, I believe that we all possess the traits and beliefs of a Magnus officer. If we didn’t we wouldn’t be in the positions we are in today, or more notably bettering ourselves taking this very course. As I was listening to the video presentation from Lt. Chris Hoina, I began to ask the question; how do we advance our officers to becoming Magnus officers? My first response to the question was that it starts at the top. What I mean by this is, as leaders of our organization we need to be setting the example of Magnus virtues to our officers.

    Some of the Magnus beliefs are to have shared visions, as well as strengthening others (Hoina, 2021). An example that I can give is from my agencies most recent strategic plan session. In 2019, the leaders in my agency came together to create a 3-5 year strategic plan. The purpose of this was to create goals for the department and to set established shared visions of the department. The shared vision was then passed down to all members of the department. This strengthen the entire department and modeled the Magnus virtues we need to be striving for as law enforcement officers.

    References

    Hoina, C. (2021). Virtues of magnanimous officers. Module 1, Week 1. National Command and Staff College.

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    Kaiana Knight

    Surprisingly, when I started this module I was not familiar with the word "Magnus" better yet "Magnus Officer." This lesson was very detailed in my opinion, and I realized throughout this lesson that I share many characteristics of a Magnus Officer. I also realized during this lesson that I need to read more books. Integrity and faithfulness are words that I follow and act on daily. Respect can be difficult at times for all of us in this line of work, but when it was defined in the lesson it made me appreciate the fact that I refrain from using vulgar language even when it's constantly used against me. Health was another big takeaway for me from this lesson. I exercise daily and I think that it helps me think clearer, and it helps relieve any stress that may be lingering from a busy work day. I do believe in order to be a Magnus Officer we must constantly improve our thinking, speaking, actions, and deeds. We must also be great at listening. Several times throughout my work day I have to listen to my coworkers so I can provide the best feedback. Even while taking phone calls, you have to be poised when someone on the other end is yelling at you. Another topic that was covered during this lesson that stood out for me was when the instructor spoke about Shared Leadership, the whole is greater than the sum and that's what many leaders tend to forget. In the department I supervise, I train my coworkers on things that could benefit them as well as myself when I'm out. I'm always looking for ways to improve others as well as myself. Overall, I think this was a strong and positive topic to begin with.

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      Paul Brignac III

      I too ended this lesson with the feeling that I should begin reading more. I'm guilty of using the excuse of not having the time to read. The lesson did cause me to recall things that I have read in the past, and I will now find time to begin reading again on a regular basis.
      During the lesson there were several things that I realized I have lacked. However, I was glad to hear the instructor mention Shared Leadership. I have found that often when I've made it a point to let others help with an important task, they appreciate being involved. Allowing them to share in positives that can come with the task being successfully completed has been well received.

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    This module really makes you think and reflect on your career as an Officer and as a husband / wife. It really grabbed my attention; when Lt. Chris Hoina mentioned how "Magnus" Officers conduct themselves on and off the job. It makes you think; do I carry and uphold the same morals and values off duty as you do on duty? Do I lead and represent my family the same way? Believe it or not, many of us take on a new "persona" when we put on our uniform.

    When we're in uniform we take pride in representing our agency and what the badge stands for. Do we truly or have we really been conducting ourselves with a moral compass on and off the job? Do we hold, share, or display different morals between the two aspects (career / family).

    When Lt. Hoina spoke about the believes; he mentioned vision sharing, setting high expectations for ourselves / others, and being action oriented. All these attributes are qualities that can be utilized in both our professional and personal lives. If we stand firm and put these qualities into action; things would be much easier in both aspects. The phrase "The whole is greater than the sum" is simple but STRONG phrase!

    He also touched on the definition of "Magnus." Explaining fairness, true professionalism, taking responsibility for one's actions. These are all qualities individuals desire and posses as strong leaders in their communities, careers, and households.

    When you think about it, these qualities when embraced and put into practice; can and will make you a better person for your family, career, and community.

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    Paul Brignac III

    I believe that the concepts of Magnus can benefit individuals and groups of people in nearly every way. Obviously these qualities will help you improve as a LE professional and a leader, but also on a personal level outside of work.
    In order to successfully apply these principles, self reflection and honest evaluation of ones actions, as well as thoughts, are paramount. In my opinion we often understand and accept principles, but fail to truly evaluate if we have applied them.

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    Thomas Martin

    Working with the mentality "Police are the public and public are the police" combined with the virtues of truthfulness, integrity, honor, and respect may seem overwhelming in todays society. Law enforcement officers working with these virtues as their guiding light will help them win in their communities. Supervisors expecting these virtues of their subordinates should exhibit these qualities themselves.

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      Bradley Treuil

      Well said Thomas.
      Persons placed into a position of supervision should lead by example. If you expect your crew or team to do something what does it say if you do the opposite or not at all. To carry that a little further leaders should not ask or demand something that he or she has not or will not do from the persons he is leading.

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    Bradley Treuil

    One of things that I Picked up form this is the isolation. As stated, the nature of patrol work in law enforcement is isolating in itself, this is compounded be the rural area in which I work. I am guilty of isolating myself and trying to "fix" it on my own when things happen to go wrong. I like the idea of having a mentor or someone to hold me accountable to sharing the supervision and making sure that I am not isolating myself. This is can and should be applied to more than just work. I also understand the concepts of Magnus and try to apply them to a lead by example way.

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    Robert Vinson

    The common thread that was most poignant to me throughout the lecture was the active commitment necessary to pursue magnus characteristics. It is certainly easy to become passive and fall into a routine, resulting in a loss of forward momentum and self improvement. I thought Lt. Hoina said it most concisely when he stated the magnus path is "simple but not easy." While it may not be easy to maintain the active pursuit of the discussed principals, I think that simple, steadfast commitment to self improvement over time has to potential to produce invaluable results. As he also stated, "it is a journey that never ends" - we just have to invest the active commitment to continue the journey.

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      Scott Crawford

      "Simple but not easy" As I read and reflect on that, it`s amazing how true this simple statement is. We as officers are sometimes placed in situations where the right thing is always the hardest. I believe as we look back on this lecture. We should all use this lecture to strive to become better officers and people everyday.

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    Justin Payer

    What I took most from the lecture was the need to continually better yourself in an attempt to be more Magus. We can always improve and should never be content. If we continue to try and improve ourselves, it will help ensure that we are Magnus and not forgetting our virtues.

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    Scott Crawford

    What I took away from this lesson most is, that as you strive to become a MAGNUS Officer, you can`t become stagnant. The ability to open your mind and allow yourself to grow as an officer and a person is ever changing. The one trait that I believe is so important and has been engrained into me is the word INTEGRITY. I always tell deputies, young and old that if you do the right thing every time, no matter how hard or uncomfortable it makes you feel, you will be able to stand on that integrity.