Command and Staff Program

ACE Track

The Organizational Change Battle Plan

Replies
179
Voices
93
Dr. Mitch Javidi
Instructions:  
  1. Post a new discussion related to the topics covered in this module.  Your post needs to provide specific lessons learned with examples from this module helping you enhance your leadership capacity at work.
  2. After posting your discussion, review posts provided by other students in the class and reply to at least one of them. 
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    Monte Potier

    Although no one likes change some change is necessary for the organizations health and survival. I believe that just speaking with your employees and letting them know why the change is necessary will help with some of the internal forces that may try to sabotage the change.

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      Joey Prevost

      Organizations only experience growth through change. If employees are kept informed as to the reasons for the change and the direction, they are more apt to be in line with it.

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        mtroscla@tulane.edu

        Keeping employees informed will go a long way towards acceptance of change, even if they don't like it they will accept it.

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        Sergeant Chad Blanchette

        I would add onto this thought by allowing the key players to be part of the change would likely assist with buy in.

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      Nancy Franklin

      I agree that explaining the "why" to employees will go a long way in helping them understand why change is necessary. This is perhaps the biggest hurdle to get over, but once employees understand the "why" they will be far more likely to get on board.

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        Brian Johnson

        I generally agree, but I also realize that people are prone to their daily routine, and don't like change even when it will make their job easier and more effective. We need to create the "buy-in" as part of the change process, this can be accomplished by explaining the "why" and then allowing them to be a part of the process to develop the changes and processes for implementation. Most people will not fight something that they helped developed!!

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          Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

          Brian,
          I agree the why is an important part of getting people to understand the change. The buy in is as important is as important if not more important.

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          chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

          I agree as well while its also important for us as leaders to pay more attention to the internal and external forces.

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        Frank Acuna

        Nancy, this is probably one of the keys to selling organizational change. Providing the why, explaining it adequately, showing the benefits of the change can eventually lead to increased buy-in.

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      ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

      I couldn't agree more. Talking to them gets them on board and excited to be a part of it.

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        Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

        I agree with you, you need to involve officers in the change. They need to be able to see how the change ultimately benefits them.

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      Lt. Mark Lyons

      I agree. Taking a little bit of time up front to discuss the reason for the changes might help ease the situation. Especially if you can get them to see it from your perspective. Sometimes just simply talking with them and letting them say whats on their minds will also help the situation.

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      Eduardo Palomares

      Hello Monte. You are absolutely right. Police officers don’t like change and don’t like being stagnant. The question here is how big is the change? Most changes are not that drastic but are necessary to improve or provide an alternative way of thing the same thing. I agree that change is necessary, especially in law enforcement. If change is communicated and the reason for it, our people are more likely to accept and resist less. In my experience, it was not the change but the fact that officers weren’t asked or told before the intense change took place that made them rebel. If we aren’t transparent about changes, our personnel will make it hard for us and/or sabotage the new program.

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      I definitley agree that people rarely like change. It is often easier for people to stick with what they know and what they are comfortable with. However, we all know that change can be beneficial and especially when working in law enforcement. Things and times are often changing, and we need to make sure we are changing as well. How you go about making changes is a fragile situation though. Explaining and getting buy in from employees is crucial, and as long as they understand the reason and can maybe have input, it will help make it easier.

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      Thoroughly providing the information to all who are effected by the change can help with them be more accepting, and listening to their input may give them some ownership in that change.

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    Mike Brown

    Change is always happening and once again no one likes change especially when they know it's coming and believe that it is not needed. There must be some form of prep prior to change to allow people to at least come to grips with the information.

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      Jason Porter

      We did that exact thing, with our new system coming on line. We had training workshops to get the entire agency familiar with the new software so the change wasn't just a blind act.

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    Joey Prevost

    Most people resist change because it is uncomfortable. Some become antagonistic and adversarial. Some even go so far as being an "organizational terrorist" to try and stop the change. If the leadership explores all of the who, what, when, where, why, how questions it will go a long way to plan for contingencies. If people are kept informed they are more likely to be on-board. The nine steps can used for change planning.

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      Laurie Mecum

      Joey, I agree....some do not like change and will go to all lengths to stop it from happening. It is up to the leaders to stop that behavior and show what the change is needed and the positive outcome it will bring.

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    Jason Porter

    In our department we just underwent a major change to our information technology system. I have to admit that I was skeptical about the new system, having used the old system for so long. I was assigned as a system administrator to the new system and saw the benefits of the new versus the old system. Change is not always fun, but most of the time it is necessary.

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      Drauzin Kinler

      Jason, we recently changed our RMS and CAD system at our agency. Many were skeptical when it was first announced. By creating build teams and getting feedback from all affected by the software, made the implementation and go-live process seamless. Change isn't that complicated to implement if you involve the people it will affect.

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      Judith Estorge

      Jason,
      thank you for sharing and giving hope to positive change. New technology is most often met with sighs and frustration before given a chance by officers. We are so set in our ways and reluctant to change that we miss the opportunity for improvement. Out with the old and in with the new is hard to swallow but most often for the best.

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      Clint Patterson

      Jason, what Drauzin stated above did occur, and I honestly believe that without creating the build teams, the resistance would have been much higher. This was an effective battle plan.

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    Drauzin Kinler

    My agency makes changes frequently. I have learned over the years that in order to create a positive effect in making changes, you need to include input from those that will be affected by the change. Change that is made without that input will result in resistance and morale problems in the organization. Some leaders in our organization have not figured out the correct method to use in implementing change.

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      Dan Wolff

      Drauzin Kinler,
      I definitely agree on including everyone in the process for change no matter how small or large it may be. We as effective leaders must incorporate change agents so everyone is on board with the change taking place and have buy-in. Given the change battle plan with this module only adds tools to our box for incorporating change starting with us.
      Dan

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    Judith Estorge

    Change is what everyone says they do not like until you point out that pay raises are change, promotion is change and a change in leadership are all examples of positive change. Focusing on the positive aspects will bring about a positive mindset. Often it is the agency's manner of addressing issues that bring about positive or negative view points. Leaders have the ability to affect positive responses by their own positive remarks.

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      Lance Leblanc

      That is an outstanding way to look at change, but unfortunately, as law enforcement officers, we are taught to expect the worst and hope for the best. I do agree with a change in my paycheck for the positive is the kind of change I like.

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        The idea of change is hard for people to embrace, especially those who believe it is not needed. When the powers to be inherit a stagnant agency or one that refuses to evolve, there is always resistance. Their ability to get the crew on board and become change agents is essential.

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    Dan Wolff

    When dealing with organizational change it will most always be met with resistance. Having a strategic plan before implementing is key to having success. Using the five “W’s” and the “H” are a good start in answering any questions about the change and those affected. Then using the 9 principles of war to gather all resources needed will assist in implementing with success. As Jason Porter stated in the discussion our agency went through a major change in software for jail operations, patrol, detectives, dispatch and records management. The process was over a year in the making with several training sessions. Our transfer was a success with only minor setbacks so far. But with a great team in place and all the resources at our disposal change is being accepted across the organization.

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    Nancy Franklin

    Organizational change is perhaps one of the most difficult tasks for leadership to manage. Most change will be met with some resistance, so it is important for leadership to plan a strategy before attempting to implement change. In addition, the leader must consider who is affected by the change and how this affect will pass on through the organization. when one department within an organization is affected, there will be a ripple effect in some form that impacts other parts of the organization. Thinking through these affects thoroughly allows leadership to identify and plan for potential barriers to the change management plan. Explaining the "why" to employees regarding the change is also essential to creating buy-in and alleviating employees' concerns, questions, and perhaps even some resistance.

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    Brian Johnson

    I believe one of the key components to creating positive organizational change is to provide a clear, concise, and compelling vision for the future of the organization. Allow our employees to internalize a better tomorrow with a brighter future while creating a thriving organization to fulfill our mission is inspiring, but not easy. As a leader, you need to know where you are going, how you are going to get there and provide that vision for others so they want to follow. We can't do it alone and it requires us to inspire, motivate, and call others to action. The organization can only change at the pace that your people are willing to change. Change must happen from within or it will not be impactful, meaningful, and reliable. Understand your organizational culture and you will understand if you are capable and ready for organizational change. Any other type of change will be short-lived, resented, and ineffective.

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    Clint Patterson

    Change is always complicated and can lead to fostering an understanding of operational readiness. In my state of Louisiana, legislation passed a raise in the age act. The act stated that people younger than 18 years old are considered children (juveniles) effective March 1st, 2019. However, some 17-year-olds will continue to be regarded as adults, but only if charged with a violent offense. Then to make it even more confusing on June 1st, 2020, all people under 18 are considered juveniles regardless of the crime. This was a significant swing in the norm from anyone under 16 was considered a juvenile, and 17-year-olds are adults. I had to meet with all enforcement personnel to explain this change, and even though it was a legislative act, it took an act of congress to get everyone on board.

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      Roanne Sampson

      Clint, you and your guys will probably have to send out more reminders. Everyone will then understand about the new law.

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    Laurie Mecum

    No one really likes change and usually resists it. Most resist because they don’t understand it or because they are not involved in it. Change is needed for growth and some policies, programs and procedures just grow out of date.

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      Jarod Primicerio

      I agree and feel the same way if not fully explained. Unfortunately, the changes delivered often come with little explanation causing unnecessary stress and confusion.

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    Roanne Sampson

    Change is a much needed progress to continue moving organizations forward. Organizations must be able to change with the times. Many people do not like change and will do everything in their power not to conform. When our agency adopted NETCHEX, a new online time card/payroll system, I remember so many people complained about it. It has proven to be a very efficient type of system, especially for our payroll division. This system has helped save a lot of time. I find that our agency is not afraid to implement change. If our administration finds a better way of doing things, they will implement the change.

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      David Ehrmann

      I remember when they went to Netchex. I think all of us were questioning the entire process. However, that was an excellent example of fear of change. We were all used to one way of doing things and didn’t want to learn a new way. Thinking back, I don’t know how using those old timecards were effective.

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      Rocco Dominic, III

      I remember the change to netchex and the uncertainty that went along with it. The big fear for me was the change to the new employee evaluation system. This system is better at record keeping but the added steps needed to get the evaluation finished is still and big problem. Too many steps.

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        Amanda Pertuis

        The new evaluation system is great, as long the input was given to customize it. Communications made our job specific so it reflects their job performance, instead of how you feel about that person.

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    David Ehrmann

    Change within any organization is something that is needed, but often met with resistance. People who don’t understand the need for change are more inclined to resist it. Also, organizations that continuously implement change can cause mass confusion within the organization. For example, I have been detailed to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) as a task force officer for almost four years. The DEA likes to make constant changes in policy and procedure without providing the reason for the changes. The same policies and procedures change so much; once an employee finally gets used to doing things the “new” way, they change it again. I have never seen such a poor example change management (although this is the federal government we’re talking about).

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      I agree that change is something that is needed or is inevitable. The problem is when change is for the sake of change or in your case no one explained why the previous four variations weren't working and how the new one will fix that. The DEA requires two completed forms to walk to the men's room, so I can only imagine what it takes for a boss to change policies and procedures that often. Maybe someone like you with an outside perspective can help them recognize this pitfall.

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    Christian Johnson

    Change in any Agency is necessary for growth.

    I know most are "set in their ways", but I believe this can be overcome with meaningful two-way communication. Prior to the change, explain the need for it and welcome questions. This will go a long way toward your personnel accepting it and speed up the time it takes to become the new norm.

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      Henry Dominguez

      I agree, communicating with everyone and a good explanation helps everyone see a more clear picture of why things are being done.

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    Rocco Dominic, III

    Most people do not like change and will resist it when they can. Change is necessary for an organization to remain current with the times. We have recently changed computer system this was a big change for the department. They allowed each division to have an input into the design of the system. This add the buy in to get everyone on board.

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      Donnie

      We had the same issue. There was resistance to moving to a new report writing system. Basically because it was somewhat difficult to operate ensuring we met the criteria or block checking so the FBI would have its statistics. We’ve had it for about 7 years now and the programmers are still making changes to it.

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      clouatre_kj@jpso.com

      We are working on our new ARMMS reporting system currently, and thankfully they have taken everyone's input. This is change for the better for all, therefore during this change there hasn't been any resistance. Can't say the same for when we actually switched from handwriting to laptops back in, i think, 2000 (?). This was met with huge resistance, mostly from the loder generation as most of them at the time never worked a computer in their lives. Some of those that are still around laugh about it now, but it took quite some time to realize the change was overwhemingly necessary.

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    Amanda Pertuis

    I really like the Who, What, Why, Where, When, and How questions. I think we can get buy-in from personnel by sharing the answers to those questions.

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    Jarod Primicerio

    Change is inevitable and necessary for all entities to remain relevant. Failure to do so and the desire to remain status quo is actually a reversion and provides a disservice to the organization. We constantly battle those in positions who want that easy ride and if the change "rocks the boat" it disturbs the equilibrium; thus causing conflict. I am a visionary and always looking for the next best way. Knowing not everyone progresses in this manner, I am often forced to deliver in small doses.

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      Brian Lewis

      I know your pain Jarod. I too am always looking for the next best way and have found small doses helps. It also keeps me from getting too invested and experiencing frustration.

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    Brian Lewis

    I consider myself a change agent and am always looking for ways to make us better and more efficient. Creating a battle plan and incorporating the "Who questions" will hopefully help the transition of change go smoothly.

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    Lance Leblanc

    Change is hard for most including myself, but it allows for new ideas and progression. My agencies in the process of changing leadership, which should have a positive outcome.

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    Lance Landry

    Change can be ugly and dirty. Nobody likes change but it is needed to progress toward the future. Being mindful of who, what, when, why, where, and how a change will affect people in an organization can make change a much easier pill to swallow.

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      Burke

      Change can be a grueling and hard to accept at times. This is a more structured way of implementing change within an organization.

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    Donnie

    Nobody likes change and most of us are resistant to it. We get comfortable and set in our ways when things are going well. However, organizations like law enforcement agencies have to move with change. This includes anything from the demands of technological advancements to public attitude. A lot of law enforcement change is influenced by the media which is unfortunate but certainly a reality.

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    Burke

    Change is the biggest struggle within the law enforcement community. The career is built with "type A" personalities which are needed, but that also brings a trait that resistant to new ideas. Having a good plan that explains the needs and implementation is paramount to creating change.

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      jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

      Agreed, the type A is needed but usually doesn't like change. Once they have mastered a skill or technical ability they don't like having to learn a new one. Seeking out the involvement of these people will help with the buy in process as well as allowing leaders to communicate the benefits of the change.

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    McKinney

    I found it interesting how Dr. Harrington incorporated the tactical element in preparing to implement change. In most high-risk situations, a well-thought-out plan is developed where a positive outcome often occurs. Knowing how to develop a strategy, plan, and or tactic to achieve a mission is crucial because I am sure we can call all attest to the resistance and surprise that come along with an unknown situation. Knowing and having a “Battle Plan” can help us with resistance when implementing “change” inside our organizations.

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      I also appreciated the comparison of a tactical operation to that of change in an organization. Many of the considerations and challenges are the same. The concept of having a battle plan is appropriate as is the need for evaluation and refinement of the plan.

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    jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

    There is always going to be resistance to change but being able to identify those persons and attempt to involve them in the change process is crucial. I like how Dr. Harrington brought up the point about how people like to be experts and change challenges this expertise. This is probably one of the biggest causes of resistance to change. It was also interesting how she incorporated the 9 tenants of war and how they could be used to foster change within an organization.

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      cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

      I agree on identifying the people who are going to resist the change and involving them in the process.

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    Lieutenant John Champagne

    When you implement organizational change, you must have a plan, especially for those that will obstruct the change. I think the who, what, why, where, when, and how questions layout the plan perfectly. The question of why we need the change is probably the most important to get everyone on the same page to move forward.

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      McKinney

      I agree with you that when implementing organizational change, it is imperative to have a plan of action. Change can be viewed as an obstacle for certain individuals, but if we are prepared and can present a clear understanding to our team members of how we’ll succeed by utilizing the “who, what, why, where, when, and how”, then it is more than probable that everyone we’ll be able to move forward with at least an understanding.

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      Major Stacy Fortenberry

      I agree on the why question being important. Why to the individual. Why should that person support the change.

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      Adam Gonzalez

      Once again, I find myself responding to your posts :) I completely agree with all that you cite in your original post. My observation is that there may be several saboteurs lurking in the fringes of our agencies, waiting for an opportunity to run amok. Also, like you, I believe that this must be addressed, and done so early in the developmental planning stages. We understand that their are often those that wish no change and see no value in "improvements". If we are to institute real change, not only is this to be done incrementally, addressing the five W's and one H questions but also preparing for those that will also resist this change. Buy in is critical...at all levels!

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    Change is definately constant and often resisted. The philosophies discussed in this module including the five W's and the nine principle of war give great insight in how ot approach change. I like the analogy of viewing change as a SWAT event. The planning, imiplementation, and continued evaluation and adjustment is very applicable. By using the lessons of this module I feel some of the changes I have had to spearhead may have gone smoother with better buyin from my staff in the past. I also found the statement that when everything in an agency is a priority then nothing is a priority to be appropriate. Recently our Sheriff made amazing progress in not only building a new correctional complex but instituting drastic changes in programming in an effort to address the reduction of recidivism. Many of the commanders have had to realize that the jail is the priority while these changes were being implemented and evaluated. It has been a challenge to make sure there is unity of command, however by keeping commanders updated on plans, progress, and the need for additional resources including the reasons for these needs the change has been successful.

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    Major Stacy Fortenberry

    This goes back to several previous modules dealing with change and buy-in. This module presents it as making a more formalized "battle plan". Leadership and change was a good module to pair with this one. Earning trust and dealing with the inherent fear involved will be key.

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      dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

      Major, I agree. I referred back to that module to associate the lesson with this one. It seemed tie in effectively.

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    dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

    This module can literally involve every single module we have learned since the beginning. The Battle Plan to implement change must be solid, but the ability to address problem must be fluid. Comparing this module to writing a policy, some explanations of the policy should remain vague, but not left open to so much interpretation that it can be easily scrutinized. A fatal flaw in this change is if the main person in charge is not viewed as a credible leader, subordinates will not trust the entire proposed change. If this is the case, a domino effect in the breakdown of trust, communication, and any possibility of collaboration is affected and an agency cannot serve their community effectively.

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    cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

    I agree with Dr. Harrington when she said most people dislike change although change is the only constant. People are not prepared for change and often resist change when it is not explained in a way they think is beneficial to them. I think you need a plan and a clear direction of the path you are going to take before implementing the change. You will always meet roadblocks in the process of change. This does not mean the change is a failure.

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    michael-beck@lpso.net

    The idea that the only the constant is change and change is inevitable is one that people need to fully embrace. Far too often we get stuck in the mundane, day-to-day existence when it comes to our organizations that we forget we need to evolve in order to meet the needs of our communities. I enjoyed the idea of likening organization change to a SWAT operation; just as the police will not live, change will not “go away”. It is always present, always looming. You can either embrace the inevitable to move forward or fall behind and eventually be replaced.

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    ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

    No one really likes change but that really is the only constant in law enforcement. Talking about ideas and getting input from all employees helps to ease the process and gets a little less resistance when they feel they are a part and have valuable opinions.

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    chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

    In Module 8, learning that the five W's in the age of traditional journalism who, what, when, where and how are good lay out questions needed in the development of solutions to achieve changed goals and strategies.

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      blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree, it is simple yet most administrations do not ask these questions. Why not get input from the officers that the change affects or involving them in the change to help them embrace the change.

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    blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

    Most officers resist change because the change is not explained why the change is occurring. In most cases, there is no involvement of anyone that the changes affect. The administration also does not know how the change affects the officers. I think by evolving the officers in the change and empowering those officers to take charge of the change will be a smoother transition to the change.

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      dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree if you involve everyone that will be affected but the change at least to some extent, I think people would be more receptive.

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      dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

      I certainly agree with you, Beau. All to often change is implemented without the input of the people who it will affect. If we had more involvement with the change, I think things would transition smoother, and without as much opposition.

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        guttuso_fa@jpso.com

        Definitely. Give people a chance to be a part of the change and give them some ownership. It will make the changes so much easier to transition to.

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      Chasity Arwood

      I agree, involving officers in the policy changes and allowing input will greatly increase the success.

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      mmoscona@floodauthority.org

      Absolutely true. unfortunately there is far to much "change for the sake of change" in Law Enforcement and initial buy in or participation from those that the change is going to affect is lacking.

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    dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

    I have stated before during this course that the most dangerous phrase is "because we have always done it this way". I refer to this all of the time, but I believe that change does come with a price, however it is needed, especially in the ever-evolving world of law enforcement. I think asking the key questions for who, what, when, where, why, and how are important and also valuing the opinions of those impacted by the change is equally important.

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      steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

      I agree buy in should be looked for by the people that will be affected by the change the most. Can't look just from a point of cost or administrative benefit.

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    dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

    I believe change can be a good thing if all who will be affected would be included in the process. I have seen many times that change occurs, affecting certain individuals, and those individuals were not asked for input. It is very easy for someone who hasn't worked the patrol division in several years to come up with a policy that does not take into consideration the changing needs of the patrol officer.

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      dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

      You are correct they tend to not ask or incorporate the people the change is going to effect.

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    Chasity Arwood

    Change is something that is necessary in order to stay effective in law enforcement. Many officers resist change, even if the change will benefit them. Keeping an open line of communication and explaining the reasons for the changes will greatly increase its success.

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      cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

      I agree. Change must happen and officers don't always like it. I believe if they know more of what is taking place they would accept it and better understand it.

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    guttuso_fa@jpso.com

    I find that the buy in to change is made much easier if you clearly explain the need for the change to those who will be affected by that change. They may not necessarily like the change but they are more willing to accept and go along with it if you are honest and provide a valid reason for the change. Progress is not achieved without change. The world is changing around us so we much change as the times dictate.

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      What is the one thing almost all officers agree on. We hate change, especially when its forced down our throats by the administration with no rhyme or reason. I agree that clear communication for the purpose of change allows the new procedures to be implemented smoothly.

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    cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

    Change is always taking place. LE agencies must move with the changes that are taking place around them so they are not left behind. At the same time change has to be communicated so that officers can buy in to it and not reject it.

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      anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

      I agree the only way change will be useful if there is a clear understanding of why it is needed

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    As a young chief, when I first took over, I wish I would've known about this change battle plan before changing and watching a disaster unfold. The keys in this lesson as a leader are to avoid pitfalls, such as failure to communicate, and not bringing in the right people for the right message.

    If we ask and explain the right questions, and bring in the key players that this will affect, we can avoid a disaster at the end. This also plays a huge role in employee morale and satisfaction. If we explain to us why then we control the message and the rumors.

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    In our agency, personnel often resist change because the individuals that are affected are not involved. There is often leaders that lack buy-in, which makes it difficult for change to be successful. In my department, we have created an inclusive culture. Whenever there is change, we form a committee to include both line personnel and leadership. It motivates the personnel to be involved and creates buy-in.

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      cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

      Ravenel:
      I agree that including personnel in the change process is instrumental. I think that being inclusive coupled with clearly defined vision, goals, expectations, and the path to get there help everyone navigate the way with less resistance. As leaders, it is our responsibility to help remove those obstacles blocking the path to our desired change.

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    cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

    Considering who, what, when, where, why, and how can help agencies utilize a systematic approach to achieve sustainable change when coupled with the nine principle's of war (MOOSEMUSS).

    When we are considering technological changes within our agency, we have sought the input and assistance from various people within our diverse divisions; however, in some cases we didn't seek input and assistance from the right people. We failed to ask within those divisions who are most likely leadership champions of change; we allowed Commanders to choose someone to represent their division rather than allowing those with interest to volunteer. We didn't have the right people on the bus seated in the best seats for them. To further the conundrum our expectations weren't crystal clear and we failed to create a tangible action plan within each division. We can learn from our mistakes in the past to improve implementing sustainable change moving toward the future.

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      Major Willie Stewart

      I agree, we there are so many working parts. Budgeting, timing, administrative and commanders, subordinates and public also play a major role in effective change.

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    anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

    When making change, i feel that effective communication will help workers be more receptive. By communicating help involves other workers and give them a chance to offer their feedback.

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    mmoscona@floodauthority.org

    The role of communication in change cannot be overstated. From concept to implementation keeping those that must work within the new changes must be kept informed. All to often change is ordered without any clear plan for implementation. Basically just dumped on members to implement. That certainly causes resistance on many levels no matter how good or necessary the change may be.

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      Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

      A clear plan with effective communication and reason for changes gives us a likelihood that the change will not only be accepted but also ensures that the change agents and employees will implement the change.

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      Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

      Very true, the more we effectively communicate with our officers and are transparent with our officers the fear of change can subside.

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    mtroscla@tulane.edu

    Change is a necessary part of life; however, people are universally resistant to it. It is for this reason that change in a Police Department needs to be necessary, explainable, and well communicated to everyone involved or any implementation of change will be met with resistance.

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      sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

      Not only will you be met with resistance, you may actually lose key personnel who aren't able to handle the change.

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        wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

        I agree it is crucial that all members of the organization are on the same page from top to bottom and bottom to top. This improves communication and buy in by all and reflects a more effective level of leadership.

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    Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

    The need for change is law enforcement is evident. I especially liked the comment that "change is the only constant". In our profession, everything changes almost daily, that is the reason I initially chose this profession for fear of boredom with the mundane aspects of other jobs. As leaders, we must be able to effectively communicate and implement changes within our agencies to better meet the needs of our employees and communities alike. The principles of war given to us as MOSSEMUSS give us guidelines to help present change in the most acceptable manner.

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    steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

    This is a great way to look at performing a deep change within an organization and the way to effectively succeed with the change. This is more than just a small change and is something that will take time and adjustments from more than one particular group. Using MOOSEMUSS and having the correct change agents involved will increase the likelihood of success.

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    sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

    Communication through out the department when a change is imminent, is very important. Like a previous model change just for changes sake can create confusion and demoralize the employees. A sudden unexplained change will no doubt bring resistance.

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    This module reinforces that the only constant is change. Especially today, things change on a daily basis. We have to use every tool that we have to make sure that our officers and agencies are prepared. There are always going to be things that we must hang on to, want to hang on to and wish we could hang on to. Most people tell you that the most deadly phrase is "That's the way we have always done it." I have been the one to say, "If it's not broke, don't fix it." I believe that, but I also believe that when systems or agencies change, sometimes even if something works, it has become outdated, antiquated, and sometimes dangerous. We wouldn't want to drive a model T on the interstate, but we don't want to just give the car a new paint job. In other words, when we change, it must be real, not cosmetic.

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    This module is great to show that agencies will go through growing pains no matter what level of government you work in. Its the equivalent of a head coach on a football team. All the moving parts always change, you replace them to get better, or to improve on what already works. When people fear changes to be made, there will always be subjects that aren't happy, they want the status quo to stay. Being able to lead and inspire change is a real challenge.

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      Deputy Mitchell Gahler

      We have recently gone through some change, as we have implemented NIBRS within our agency. There was a lot of confusion and negatives at first, but it has now become a part of the norm with very little negatives. In a few years, we will be going through a drastic change within our agency, as there will be a newly elected Sheriff, many up and coming supervisors, and much movement within our office. With that, there will be a lot of change regarding new roles and new hires. It will be difficult at first, but if we work through it together and stay positive, the change will be successful, and we will learn a great deal by its process.

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    clouatre_kj@jpso.com

    One thing we all know, and this module reinforces it, is that change is the only constant. We all have been through changes, which is inevitibly met with resistance. I agree that if the information is processed correctly and communicated in the correct manner and in a positive way with input from with correct individuals, people will be more receptive.

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      Eduardo Palomares

      When it comes to change no one likes it initially. Change is necessary for the betterment of an institution or for repairing a faulty operation. In law enforcement, change is necessary and vital to successful mission accomplishment. It is up to the leaders to ensure that the intended change is positively communicated to the personnel responsible for performing the take. We have to be real with those affected by the new change. This will go a long way. Leaders must be transparent and embrace the change. This will spread in a positive way among the ranks. If we embrace and support the new change, our people will do the same. It is also important to stay consistent with the change and not express our personal views about the changes especially if there are less negative. The change should be introduced gradually and in small increments. Having the proper battle plan to institute the change is vital for both our personnel and organizational satisfaction. We have to be realistic when implementing change and we have to be the change to influence others.

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    dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

    There is now way around change. Just the advancements in technology alone present enough change. But in order for the agency to grow change must take place. You will need the buy-in from support personnel to make sure it happens. Agencies need to do a better job of incorporating the people that the change is going to effect. They are the people the change has the most impact on. we need to listen to what they have top say on the change and if it feasible it needs to be taken into consideration. That is how you are going to get buy-in on change.

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    Lt. Mark Lyons

    For the most part, change is always met with resistance at some level or another. Those who are affected the most by the change will need to be sold on the positive aspects of changes being made. Putting together a "change battle-plan" will go a long way to getting everyone on board and overcoming the usual obstacles.

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    or agencies to advance change in techniques and technology is required. Change is almost always met with some form of resistance from officers. If the agency has a clear communication path with its officers, the change will be successful if the reasons for change are correctly communicated. If officers can see where the change benefits an protects the officer, the change will be successful and benefit the agency.

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    Adam Gonzalez

    The acronym MOOSEMUSS (Maneuver, Objective, Offense, Simplicity, Economy of Force, Mass, Unity of Command, Surprise, Security) is an entirely new concept that this module has introduced to me. I especially appreciated the Surprise concept and the explanation of surprises that should have been known or anticipated vs. true surprises. I also very much appreciated the instructor reminding all of us that change is the only constant and the 5 W's and 1 H (Who, What, When, Where, Why and How) or modern journalism and its applicability to our roles as public safety professionals.

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      Royce Starring

      I agree it was a new concept to me also. I also found the surprise vs surprise interesting. The knowing surprise and the surprising surprise, being prepared and unable to prepare for such surprise.

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    Royce Starring

    Organizational change is inevitable in law enforcement. As people retire change will occur. It is how we prepare for these changes is what determine if the organization will thrive or struggle.

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    wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

    In these moments, leadership, as well as multiple layers of the chain of command, must synchronize efforts to gain the leverage necessary to implement the change or sustain it.

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    Henry Dominguez

    Change in law enforcement is a constant thing. Communication is key to helping everyone understand and also allows questions to be asked which can be answered to clarify things so that there is no confusion. everyone needs to be on the same page, especially the "Unity of Command" under the MOOSEMASS concept is an absolute must.

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      Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

      agreed through all these modules Communication has been the tool. great leadership and communication will help the changes work.

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    Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

    Change is necessary, over the past few months our organization has experienced change which has taken place to protect our officers. I am a firm believer when changes are made, there should be explanations as to why the need for change is taking place. Communication is a vital role in change. Personnel should welcome questions from subordinates. When it comes to change leadership should listen to the feedback from their subordinates, give some thought and consideration to what they are saying. When communication percolates between leaders and their personnel honest and reliable relationships occur and our organization can begin to flourish.

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    Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

    Explaining the why is very important why trying to initiate change. If people understand why the change is necessary, there is usually a lot less resistance. I feel the buy -in is just as important because it is much harder to resist the change if they are involved in the process.

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    Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

    Recently, we had a huge technological change within my agency. We transitioned from an outdated software system to a more modern software. During the transition threats of fear due to change were felt. As leaders we worked alongside our officers to build the software to the most useful needs for our agency. Buy in was a success and it resulted in a positive change.

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      Lt. Joseph Flavin

      That's great to hear that your agency had the buy in from your officers. I think that working together with them in the building phase certainly contributed to that.

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    This module does an excellent job of defining the who, what, why, where, when and how of change. It is good to use these questions to systematically run through your ideas prior to facilitating change. Many time we fall short and try to force ill conceived concepts on our staff then become mad when they fail or do not give the desired results. Being more thoughtful of change is never a bad thing.

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    Lt. Marlon J Shuff

    There is one thing that you could be sure of in police work, and that is that things are going to change. It's inevitable. What we can do, though, as a leader, is control how you handle the change by communicating it to your officers.

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    Lt. Joseph Flavin

    One thing I've picked up on since I started is that people resist change. While it is inevitable in this profession, there are ways that leaders can help others accept change. Too often there is "change for the sake of change." I think that creating an organizational change battle plan will help mitigate some of the resistance to it. When reasons for change and the benefits to that change are adequately explained to those that the change affects, change will be more accepted.

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    Change seems to be the toughest thing for officers to encounter. When I have implemented a change in our agency it has been met at times with resistance. Having a battle plan as was mentioned in this module certainly is something to consider to help make the change as seamless as possible. What I have done lately is to start mentioning the changes for a period of time before it is implemented. This gets officers to start thinking about the change. I then look for ways to have officers help me implement the change to achieve buy-in.

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      Sergeant James Schueller

      I like that approach of mentioning the change prior to implementation. I can imagine it helps people get used to the idea before its practice, and also helps staff get over that initial response of negativity because it allows time to "sink in" before going live.

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        I agree. I like the idea of letting officers have "buy in" to a new program or piece of equipment. With the right guidance they typically make the same choice (or at least understand better why you made the choice).

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    Sergeant James Schueller

    The topic of change is usually a hard topic to discuss, for the same reason people are resistant to it- people generally don't like change. However, we know as current or future leaders that we not only need change, but we must seek it out to improve ourselves and our organizations. I really liked the Who, What, Why, Where, When and How plan definitions. The example questions to ask ourselves in each of those categories really expanded my outlook as to how we can apply them to facilitate change.

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    Deputy Mitchell Gahler

    Change is going to happen within our agencies. Not all change is going to be enjoyable or easy to get through. However, it is pivotal in order for organizational growth. Change is all about learning and exploring and implementing new and improved ways of doing things. Some change will have resistance, but will subside over time. There will be change in leadership, and new practices and expectations will be put in place that was different from your last supervisor. It’s how we deal with the change that makes it successful. We can either accept the change and work through its quirks in order to be successful, or we can buck the change to make it harder and less successful. It may not be easy or liked, but it’s how we deal with it that makes us better as an organization.

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    Samantha Reps

    Change is one of the most challenging things for staff to accept and adapt to accept. Change is met with resistance and I do agree that having a battle plan in place may help with a smoother process. Being clear on why the change needs to happen and being able to answer the "whys" is beneficial to all.

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      Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

      I agree, I think the hardest part is the acceptance portion. The battle plan plays an important part in the opening dialogue of change. Explaining the who, what, where, when, and why is imperative for officers to accept that this change is going to occur is important. When officers at least have some of their questions answered it helps make sense of the movement.

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    Frank Acuna

    Change is good, change is good, change is good. Repeating this is one method of releasing the anxiety that most have toward change. Change is good and being stagnant can be damaging to your career, health, and personal life. Change, however, is something that brings on anxiety for most people. How can we as leaders help to implement organizational change and reduce the anxiety of that change. Change brings on new challenges but also a tremendous amount of opportunity. Identifying the stakeholders, who will be most impacted, and who will likely fight change is key when building a battle plan for organizational change. Providing the benefits and reason for the change to these same people can help to alleviate some anxiety for organizational change and garner buy-in to make the change more effective.

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    Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

    Change is a constant within our profession. There is not doubt that there are people who are apprehensive about change, maybe because it brings uncertainty, maybe because it brings feelings of discomfort? I don't think there is any one true reason that applies to everyone. We as leaders though have the responsibility and power to convey why this change is occurring as well as the potential results of this change. It seems as though accepting this change is the hardest part of the process.

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    Sergeant Chad Blanchette

    In thinking back over the previous modules that we have been through, it seems to me that the best way to implement change is to involve the people in the change that it is effecting. There seems to always be resistance at almost every level to change because it is new and outside the norms of how we have always done something.

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      Kyle Turner

      I agree that involving those affected by the change is important. Clearly communicating the objective and then empowering the group to chart the course often creates the buy-in needed to effect change.

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      Sergeant Kelly Lee

      Absolutely agreed Chad, as we've learned in previous models, if we can involve those who will be effected by the change then we are more likely to have "buy in" from them and supporting the mission for the organization. As cops we all dislike change and wonder why it's happening but if we are told up front about it or are included we are much more accepting of it.

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      Sergeant Durand Ackman

      Absolutely! It is best to include those that are going to be affected by the change and usually the sooner you get them involved the better it goes. I've had a few times when I get them involved and they come up with some hiccups I hadn't thought of. With their help we were able to make adjustments and have successful rollouts of the change.

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    Kyle Turner

    As many have said, change is difficult for so many, likely because it involves a lot of unknowns for those affected. It requires a significant amount of trust in leadership that the change will bring positive results. This trust is tested repeatedly throughout the change process and requires a lot of preparation and planning to ensure leadership is on the same page (Unity of Command) and sharing the same message. The larger the change the more significant planning and preparation required. The 9 principles of war discussed are helpful during this planning process.

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      Timothy Sandlin

      I agree preparation, inclusion, planning, and UNITY of Command are critical to successfully negotiating through change process. If you don't have those things in place its like going into a game facing an opponent you have no knowledge of and hoping it all works it good.

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    Sergeant Kelly Lee

    As officers, most of us to not like change. We are that type A personality that likes things to remain status quo that we can have control over. When change happens we will like we've lost control and do not understand why the change is happening. To keep up with the ever evolving world we live in we need to start embracing the change and realize that to do our jobs effectively and before we retire that change is going to happen many many times over. We need to be supportive and hopefully be included in administrations future planning.

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    Ryan Manguson

    Quoted from the lecture, "Many people dislike change, although change is the only constant." Change occurs whether people like it or not. However, change is much more accepted when the who, what, where, why, and how are explained. From my experience, people are also more excepting of change when they feel they have provided input into the change process.

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      Sergeant Paul Gronholz

      Absolutely, again communication is key. Too often, communication of key changes are not adequately explained. As leaders, we can be mindful of that and communicate more effectively. Communication of course doesn't just mean leaders telling officers how things are going to be, but communication includes listening to concerns and using understanding to overcome obstacles.

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    Sergeant Paul Gronholz

    I appreciated the 9 tenets of war steps to plot a course of action. There are certainly many ways that law enforcement has had to adapt in the past few years, especially last year. It was helpful to me to identify and explain each step in the change process. In order for meaningful change to be implemented, each step must be taken. When steps are skipped or shortcuts to change occur, leaders will face increased skepticism towards and reluctance to change.

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      Christopher Lowrie

      Great take Paul. The important park is not skipping steps or taking shortcuts. The tenets of war have worked for a long time for a reason.

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    Sergeant Durand Ackman

    Change is about the only constant anymore and we need to know how to embrace it, adapt to it and encourage it. Change is always difficult and usually met with pushback from those it will affect. It is important for us to learn ways to make the change easier for those affected. This module had some good information to help with that process. I also liked the Eisenhower quote Harrington mentioned in this module about leadership.

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    Some excellent pointers for dealing with change. We are all stubborn when it comes to change if it effects what we are comfortable with. understanding and communicating the end goal effectively is key to success.

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    Major Willie Stewart

    I enjoyed this module. This module address one of the hardest demands in policing “change.” As creatures of habit, most law enforcement officers dislike change. We often to refer to one of the most unexpected things as traffic stops as “routine.” I think it is most important that this lecture discussed the 5 w’s; who, what, when, where and why. These are the most important when addressing change.

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    Timothy Sandlin

    The view taken comparing a change plan with a battle plan with the 9 principles of war is something I had not thought of before, however, makes practical sense. It is good to have a list of questions ready to answer to assist in forming the "battle plan" for change. Having these answers will help the leader and teams navigate through the difficulties of a change process with much more success and buy-in. Good information in this module.

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    It's funny that cops, who deal daily with ever changing environment and scenarios are so resistant to internal change. I guess it has to do with the need to have something that is constant in their lives? Having a plan for how to overcome the resistance to change on the front end is important. Relying upon the old "'cause I said so!' doesn't really work. If the first line leaders aren't sold on the change, there will be so much friction and the transition will be a constant struggle. The key seems to be selling the reasons for the change and how it is going to help.

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      Robert Schei

      I agree, staff need to understand the why related to change. They may not agree with the change but they need to understand its purpose. Often times change is met with resistance because staff are not involved on the front end and have little input into the need and amount of change required.

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      Selling the change can be very hard. I think cops are suspicious by nature and that feeds into some of the resistance to change. Ultimately, once we get them over the hump, most people do just fine adapting to change. I think a mix of because we said so (not using those words) and the lesson learned in this module, ultimately work together to bring forward change.

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    This module just strengthens the principles learned in the team and organization development as well as the deep change modules. Achieving buy in is necessary to make a change successful and doing so requires being able to relate the need and benefit for the change. When a change is rolled out will little communication, the first instinct is to wonder why one more thing is being added to your plate. Being able to negate that feeling by establishing that particular change is helpful, necessary and "why" is important. Unless the change is just for the sake of change, in which case good luck with that. And I agree with Jed, "cause I said so" quit working with the last generation. And honestly it takes far less time to explain change than it does to plan, prep and implement it, so why not.

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    Nicole Oakes

    Law enforcement officers are constantly problem solving and controlling situations. So when it is time to implement change, they need to be aware and have a "buy in" so that they know how it will affect them, so they have a sense of control. It really helps when you have the front line leaders in agreement with the change. They will act as your change agents.

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    Robert Schei

    Change is inevitable and challenging. It is imperative that as leaders we recognize the conflicts that change creates and find champions of change. Change is a lengthy process that involves many moving parts. Having a solid plan and understanding the What, Why, Where, When and How aspects of change will help move change in a positive direction.

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    Christopher Lowrie

    When making changes answering the five W's and following the nine principles of MOOSEMUSS is a must for making changes in the law enforcement world. By identifying internal and external forces that both create and resist change police leaders are in a better position to think about the resources needed to change the organization.

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      Good points brought forth in this module on change. External and internal forces are always at work, especially in 2021 law enforcement. Consider the change that's being thrown at us in police reform. To me, this is a case study on what not to do. Force feed people and expect they'll ask for seconds.

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      Maja Donohue

      I agree that we need to do a better job of identifying internal and external factors and that planning for change is critical. When the process is laid out and explained to people they are less likely to resist the change.

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    I think the fundamentals of answering the who, what, where, when, why, and how are extremely important to remember when making changes in an organization. Those are questions we have to answer everyday while doing our jobs and handling situations with people in the community, but they are often forgotten when handling things within our own organization and with our employees. Being able to answer those questions as to why change is occurring and before it actually happens, will most likely result in less resistance from people. An example of this not happening in our agency was recently when COVID started. Our agency is a very tight knit group. Patrol, detectives, dispatchers, jailers, etc. are typically close and solid relationships inside and outside of work. They often have group gatherings outside of work and are overall friends. During shifts, it was always allowed to have patrol go into dispatch to visit and to discuss calls. Once COVID started, they were banned from doing that. Everyone understood, but they were allowed to go into the same break room together and other things like that without any issues. Now that is has been over a year, it has been obvious that morale has drastically decreased and newer people especially aren't getting that interaction. Besides building a stronger relationship, it also effected newer people being able to learn how to do things better or what could have went better. Everyone has been upset by the change because no one is getting much for answers or if things will ever be able to go back to a new normal. Some believe that a specific administrator just doesn't want people being able to interact like they used to.

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    We don't need to change. Sounds familiar to me when someone suggests a new idea. This is a good place to bring up Grandma's Ham analogy. The story goes like this. A child watches mom cut off some ham on each end before placing it into the oven. Curiously she asks her mom, "why do you cut off each end of the ham before you bake it?" The mother responds, "that's the way my mom prepared the ham." In other words, humans will follow the lead of the previous generation blindly because "it's the way we always did it."

    To the issue in the lecture. The 5 W's need to be asked and validated. Change just to change doesn't make sense. So goes the old adage, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." People, including ourselves, need to understand why, when, where, how, who, and what the change is. Further, we want to know how it benefits us as employees. Think back to earlier modules that discussed change management. We need to lead change like we lead other aspects of our leadership roles.

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      Andy makes a good point. Change for the sake of change makes no sense. It is this type of change that drives the rank and file crazy. I saw this frequently in the Army when a new commander arrived. They had a limited time in their position and everyone wanted to leave their mark because it looks good on an evaluation. Instead of asking people what they thought needed to be changed or improved, the new commander typically made cosmetic changes that generally made things worse for those who had to implement it. Our officers are smart. They can see when someone is only going after low hanging fruit to make themselves look good. We as leaders need to seriously think through the why (purpose for change) before we start the change process.

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    Dr. Harrington made several key points. First, I found Dr. Harrington's last comment to be very profound, " change cannot be left to chance". Whether it is forced upon us or something we desire, it is the leader's responsibility to manage change. Second, the 5 W's (Who, What, Why, When, Where, and How) can be applied any time you are faced with the need for change. Dr. Harrington provided some great examples of questions to ask for each area. I have found that if you can gather your leaders and some of the people you think will be resistant to the change to answer these questions, you can develop buy-in and consensus early in the process. Third, the need to identify and remediate obstructions to change cannot go understated. These friction points can be people, processes or resource limitations. Lastly, continuous, clear communications and unity of command is critical to affecting positive change. Tying the agency's vision, mission, and core values to the change narrative impacts the organizations culture. Unity of command ensures that everyone speaks the same language. Unity weakens those who would obstruct change. Change and how it is managed can be a defining moment for a leader.

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    Not all like change, but it is the responsibility of the leaders to make change happen and to sell the change to the people it effects. By using the who, what , where, why, and how methodology will help us make the change and assist us with others learning to except it better.

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    Maja Donohue

    To effectively implement change, we must prepare and communicate effectively. Taking the time on the front end to explain the who, what, when, where, why, and how will ease everyone’s anxiety and make it easier to adjust if things don’t go as planned. I think people resist change when they don’t feel included, especially if it impacts them directly.

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      Matthew Menard

      Very true. When practical, including as many people as possible in the implementation of change makes the transition easier.

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    Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

    I can appreciate Dr. Harrington's comment when she said most people dislike change although change is the only constant.
    I think we all realize that people are not prepared for change and often resist change when it is not explained to them in a way they think is beneficial. You need to think ahead and develop a plan with a clear direction for implementing change. There will always be those who are resistant and serve as roadblocks in the process. This should not stand in your way and does not mean change is a failure.

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    Matthew Menard

    Nothing is more true, especially when dealing with law enforcement personnel than "many people dislike change, although change is the only constant”. Leaders must understand and remain open minded to change. Our jobs see an increasing amount of change every day - some of which is good and some is bad. If we learn to role with the punches and accept this change or at least find ways for negative change to minimally impact us, we will find ourselves more successful and often find better ways to perform our jobs.