Command and Staff Program

ACE Track

Self-Management Skills

Replies
214
Voices
110
Dr. Mitch Javidi
Instructions:  
  1. Post a new discussion related to the topics covered in this module.  Your post needs to provide specific lessons learned with examples from this module helping you enhance your leadership capacity at work.
  2. After posting your discussion, review posts provided by other students in the class and reply to at least one of them. 
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    Chris Corbin

    Learning about the 12 Self-Management Skills not only helped me to identify some distinct areas in which I must work to improve upon my skills but gave me a starting point as to how to do so. While applying some of the techniques proposed in the module will certainly be challenging (nothing good is easy, right?), I appreciate the power and simplicity of this concept and believe that others will also. For that reason, I look forward to sharing this information with my supervisors to not only help them further develop their own personal competencies but to put them in a position where they will be able to help their staff to do the same.

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      Brian Johnson

      Chris, getting all your supervisors to accept that they can grow in the area of personal development, is the key to them having better relationships with there, family, friends, and co-workers. Create a Master Mind group might be a great way all of you can grow together. Brian

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        Chris Corbin

        Brian, over the past three months, my supervisors and I have been reading "It's Our Ship" and meeting weekly to discuss how we can each use the principles contained in the book to better ourselves in our service to others. The results are that we are enjoying the personal and professional development that you alluded to in your post, all while building a more cohesive leadership team. With just a few chapters remaining, we are working on identifying the next book that can help us to continue this journey forward.

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    Kyle Turner

    I appreciated this module and the emphasis that the building of each skill is dependent upon the prior skills being developed. I also appreciated that being intentional in developing these skills will help with career development and overall life satisfaction. I have found that throughout my career I have done little planning and have not been intentional in developing these skills, but rather developed them as I have needed them in each position. Putting effort into these skills will help me in my career. Also, I appreciate the point that developing stress management skills, before you need them, is important as most people, including myself, develop them after significant stress events.

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      Monte Potier

      I also have not planned enough and waited to develop a plan as I needed it. The mentioned skills sure could have helped me a long time ago. But now that I am armed with this knowledge I will certainly pass it on.

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      Nancy Franklin

      Kyle, I found myself thinking similar thoughts as you did as I worked through this module. I too have found that I have worked on developing my skills to fit my career, rather than being intentional in planning for a career and life that I want to live. This module caused me to self-reflect and shift my mindset on finding the life balance and taking time for taking care of myself so that I can better take care of others and be a better leader in my own organization.

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    Brian Johnson

    This module is the biggest area where I need to grow. We are all wired differently and understanding how you can re-program your subconscious mind through daily exercises (PQ Reps) is a powerful way to increase your EQ skills. Being present and intentional during meetings and other interactions with staff is something that requires me to focus on daily. Learning to be present shows that you have a genuine interest in your people. These 12 skills are the building blocks that will help me to be a better person and leader. To state the obvious, these skills will benefit you both personally and professionally. It's all about Balance!

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      Frank Acuna

      Brian, I agree with your assessment that we can all learn to be more present and we can all grow our skills in these areas. Balance is sometimes hard to achieve when you are busy, motivated and have duties that pull you in various directions. Balance is key and I personally seek to find more balance in my personal and professional life.

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      Joey Prevost

      And about learning from our mistakes! As the lecture said, how can we keep doing the same thing and expect a different outcome. Sometimes we have to start with changing our beliefs which lead to our actions.

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        Jarvis Mayfield

        I agree that once you are able to identify that a change is needed, one must start the change from within to show that he/she can show others that change is possible.

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      Jarod Primicerio

      Totally agree Brian. It is interesting to dissect ourselves and identify where we need to improve. As law enforcement leaders, we are often doing this to our subordinates, but this self-reflection will help them and us grow together.

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    Monte Potier

    This module did make me self-reflect and understand that I could strengthen my skills in several areas. I know that the skills I have learned today will help me with my personal development. I truly believe that this is something we should teach to younger officers that are just making law enforcement a career.

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      Jason Porter

      I agree. This should be something taught in the academy so that new recruits can implement this into their careers and personal lives from the beginning.

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      Laurie Mecum

      Monte, I think this would be a great idea to teach to the new recruits in our future academy. This is something I may suggest. It is great tool for them.

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      cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree that this would be a great tool to teach all personnel early in their career. I find self-management helps us to be happier and more productive.

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      Lt. Mark Lyons

      I agree. This module made me take a moment to identify the skills that I need to improve on going forward. I also found that there were several topics discussed in this module that I believe would be beneficial to teach to our deputies, both old and new.

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      Kyle Phillips

      I agree with you Monte, I also reflected upon my own skills throughout this module and areas where I could use additional effort. I agree that young officers should be taught these skills, but I think bringing these into the high schools, and certainly colleges would also be beneficial, as these are valuable and applicable to every career and lifestyle.

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      Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

      I agree with your review of this module forcing us to self-reflect and look inwards towards areas where we can strengthen our skill set. This concept has helped me in my career development and is something I reflect on daily.

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    Frank Acuna

    The 12 Self Management Skills in this lesson brought several things to light for me personally. The idea that you must have an intentional plan for your career will help you not only help yourself achieve your goals with less stress, but also to help mentor others and help them plan out their career. The biggest takeaways involve work-life balance and time management together. I am pretty good at my time management while at work, but struggle with a work-life balance and I can be more intentional to set aside time to complete tasks that make me happy and more productive at home. Those who have a strong work ethic, or may be "workaholics" can find it difficult to leave work at work and be intentional when they are at home. This lesson provided plenty of ideas of how I can be more focused on living a more intentional, happy and productive life, personally and professionally.

    Frank

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    Joey Prevost

    "Live on purpose, not by accident." This lecture made me realize how I could better map out my professional as well as personal lives. The 12 steps to self management should be of great help. Each one builds on the previous. We need to be properly grounded to even get started and centered to keep our composure.

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      Dan Wolff

      Joey Prevost,
      Your comments on the being properly grounded and centered are skills that must be practiced to become a better leader. Even being centered in the presence of stress takes practice but can display a command presence of being in control if you stay centered. I believe both centered and grounded compliment each other and sets a foundation for the rest just as you stated.

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      Drauzin Kinler

      Good quote and so true. I found many new things that can help improve upon my self-management skills. By focusing on these skills it will definitely help improve my abilities to be a better overall person.

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    Nancy Franklin

    I really enjoyed this module and did a lot of self-reflecting on things that I can do better and on ways in which I can grow. I have always considered myself a life-long learner and thoroughly enjoy the process and enlightenment that occurs with learning. This module discussed the 12 Self Management Skills and how they build upon one another for the purpose of achieving a well-balanced life. I believe I am good with time management and accel in this area in my professional life, but what I have found that I am lacking is a good work-life balance. The tools provided in the module will assist me in becoming a better version of myself and hopefully a better mentor to those in my professional and personal life. It is important to remember that as a supervisor and leader in my organization, others look to me to see how I live my life at work as an example and guide for how they too can achieve their own personal goals. Taking the time to focus on living and maintaining a well-balanced and healthy lifestyle can have a significant impact on those whom I contact in my life.

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    Dan Wolff

    This module was extremely helpful in recognizing the 12 life skills to follow. I also followed along and did a self-assessment and realized I have plenty to accomplish as well. Knowing my personal sense of mission, values and beliefs will set me up to understand better why I am in this profession. Also, with a majority of law enforcement, balancing the work-life with personal is crucial in reducing stress, not only at home, but work as well. I believe if I managed my time more efficiently along with my subordinates, time at home would be better managed as well. Great module for self- assessment.

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      Lance Leblanc

      Dan, you are right about time management and balancing work and personal life. Stress kills more police than anything and should be addressed more often.

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    Jason Porter

    This module helped me look at myself and taking care of myself. The techniques described are something that I need to work on in my professional and personal life. I think that these techniques will allow me to live a more fulfilling life and prosper at my work place.

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    Drauzin Kinler

    The 12 self-management skills listed in the lecture have opened up my eyes to see some areas that I need to focus on self-improvement. One area that I am focusing my attention on is to have a positive mental attitude. In the law enforcement profession, many officers are constantly exposed to negative environments most of their careers. As such, we tend to allow this negativity to become part of our attitudes. Many officers revert to what they know when dealing with challenging situations and display a negative attitude. I find myself at times doing the same thing even though as a leader I should be portraying a positive attitude. By focusing on having a positive mental attitude, it should also help improve my stress and health management.

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      Magda Fernandez

      I will have to agree with you whole heartedly, officers are exposed to a lot of trauma. Many don’t deal with the effects or take proactive measures to maintain their mental health and reduce their stress. Eventually becoming cynical, disenfranchised and they tend lose empathy for the people they interact with. This behavior embodies our being and it directly affects our loved ones at home and our work. Unfortunately, it is not just critical incidents in the street that officers have to deal with that affect their stress and mental wellness. It is the moral trauma they suffer within their own agencies as well. The feeling of betrayal and lack of support that is a major contributor to their stress.

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    Jarod Primicerio

    This module covered so many necessary components for self-reflection. The majority of these skills are mentioned, referred to at times, or practiced regularly, but not enough. As I reflect where I need to improve, I am also thinking of integrating these concepts/skills at an upcoming training day for all of my staff to learn. We will grow stronger together knowing and understanding where improvements are needed.

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      Brian Lewis

      I like the idea of integrating the 12 skills in upcoming training for my subordinates as well. Something I need to look into once I'm done with National Command and Staff College.

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    Mike Brown

    In my 28 years of being a police officer, I have done little planning on improving my personal career. I did not realize that I needed to invest not only my money but the betterment of my life. I had no idea of the 12 steps of self management, which could have made at least part of my life and career better. I will assess the areas of where I need to improve, by applying as many of the 12 steps as possible.

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      Chasity Arwood

      I agree with you, career planning is something that I never put a lot of thought into. It would have been beneficial to think about this much earlier in my career. This is something that I will talk to younger officers about.

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    Lance Leblanc

    This video lecture was beneficial and will assist me in going forward. Especially the part that addresses stress management. We all deal with stress in different ways. Some do a better job than others. I for one want need to get better at stress management. I will often use vices such as food and alcohol.

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      David Cupit

      I agree with you Lance it was very beneficial. I often turn to alcohol for stress relief along with my buddies. I don't remember turning to food. Looks like we are headed in the right direction now.

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    Magda Fernandez

    This was a really good module. Reminded me of a lot of things I have been neglecting. The importance of constantly being aware and managing things like your stress and your time are critical. The lecture and the essay reminded me about how much I have failed to manage my stress. It made me re-prioritize what I am doing. This course has taken a lot of my time and this prompted me to take a look at my time management. I have re-analyzed my priorities and re-structured how I am doing things. It is very easy to lose ourselves in the work that we do. These 12 reminders are good to have to help focus on what is important. As leaders it is critical we are at the top of our game. I find myself telling people it is important to have a good work life balance and at times I fail to do it myself. We must stay healthy in body, mind and soul to help us be effective leaders, parents and friends and more.

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      Judith Estorge

      Magda,

      I agree with your last sentence and recognize the areas within my own life where more time is needed. With this module I hope to refresh my allotted time on my body, mind and soul. I can stand to input more into every category.

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    David Cupit

    Very good lecture. Reminds me that you help any one else succeed in live until you know your own self. I have been guilty of finding the wrong way to deal with stress,which makes it worse then i cant sleep. I will be making a conscience effort to keep the 12 steps in my life and teach others about them. Very good leadership skills learned in this module.

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    Chasity Arwood

    The 12 self-management skills in this lecture is something that I will try to keep in mind in order to focus on what is important. Stress management is something that I can really improve on. As with most of us, stress is part of the job but I could do a better job of recognizing and managing it.

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    Brian Lewis

    What I gained from this lecture is that I don't work enough on myself in regards to stress management. Working fulltime while trying to manage National Command and Staff College has been pretty stressful as of late. My bosses know that I'm enrolled in this course, yet they continue to pile projects on my desk. Using some of the techniques in the 12 self-management skills discussed in this module is going to help me have a more balanced work/home life.

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      Henry Dominguez

      Brian I can't agree with you more and also it sounds like a lot of us are also guilty of not working on ourselves either. The stresses of professional and personal life really do take a toll on a person. Hopefully recognizing our faults in some areas can help alleviate the stress we bring on ourselves by using techniques that were presented in the lecture.

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      Samuel Lucia

      Brian, you're so right, and with all that is going on in the world, but think about all we've accomplished thus far!

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    Henry Dominguez

    I think the 12 self-management skills are very important to learn and recognize early in a career. This type of management is so beneficial to young officers joining the force. With "A" type personalities in this profession, we drive ourselves and are afraid to show weakness and act like we have it all under control. We put to much on our plate and create such a stressful environment that we think we can handle, when it does not need to be that way. I think by knowing these 12 self-management skills and using them might not solve all issues but can definitely help alleviate some of the stress we create.

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    Judith Estorge

    This module was beneficial in reminding me what is important in my life and career. To take time to enjoy life besides just all work. I like the quote "live on purpose, not by accident". There are several areas within my life to make improvements and the 12 skills of living and working effectively is a great reminder.

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      Clint Patterson

      I, too, wrote down the quote, “live on purpose, not by accident.” Without a clear purpose, you will have some happiness but never real joy. I plan to look at my life from the outside and determine if I am keeping my life in line with my purpose.

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    Clint Patterson

    This section brought to light several self-management skills that we take for granted in our careers and personal life. The part on centering ourselves is a proper evaluation of if we are in control of ourselves. It’s like a state of alertness but relaxed at the same time. I know I have struggled with keeping my thoughts and emotions in check at times when dealing with supervisors who fail to do as they say. This is a time when I must calm myself down and become mindful. Equally important is, remembering to be happy and letting go of guilt in our life so that we can become centered again.

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    Laurie Mecum

    The 12 skills were really an eye opening experience. Many can relate to all of them in our daily lives, personal and professional. I wish I would have had information on these a long time ago. There are several that I can relate too and see myself needing to work on. Work-life balance, stress management, time management just to name a few. Since starting this program, time management has been a huge problem trying to stay on task with my daily job and staying on track with the program too in order to finish on time.

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      David Ehrmann

      I cannot agree more. Just think how more balanced our lives would have been if we knew this a long time ago. Not only with the stressors, we’re dealing with now, but everything in the past that we could have managed a lot better.

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    Amanda Pertuis

    The 12 self-management skills in this module are so helpful in work life and home life. There are quite a few that I need to work on, but the biggest is time management. This has been a struggle trying to keep up with work duties, Command College and home duties.

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      Lance Landry

      Amanda I agree with you. Once we master the skills they will help us to become better people overall. I was thinking the EXACT same thing regarding the time management and stress management skills portion of the lecture.

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    David Ehrmann

    This module was an eye-opening experience. The 12 skills are something that everyone can learn from and help improve their entire lives. Another student said something I was thinking as well; I wish I had learned about this early on in my career. Personally, planning to provide balance in my life was something I wish I learned a long time ago. As law enforcement officers, we tend to focus on our careers, at least in the beginning. Generally, we work shifts that take us away from significant events such as holidays and birthdays. We must find a balance in both our professional and personal lives.

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      ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

      I couldn't agree more. This knowledge would have really been great 20 years ago! We now have the opportunity to help those just starting out.

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    Samuel Lucia

    Self managing our mental and physical health involves so much. Have you ever known those folks who have the ability to disassociate from work? A couple of things are always apparent. They have interests and hobbies outside of work, and/or their home support system is firing on all cylinders.

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      Christian Johnson

      I could not agree more, Sam.

      I don't have a proper balance between life and work, but my eyes are open to the importance of it thank to Doctor Anderson.

      I have already taken steps to improve the balance this morning and will continue working on it for the benefit of myself, my family and my team.

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      Lieutenant John Champagne

      I agree with the mental and physical health. Physical health is easier to accomplish early on in your career, whereas mental health is needed later in your career. This is where your hobbies and family play a role in your health.

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      This is agreed upon, this video would be a great tool to use for training and to implement as a new hire tool. This maintains a tone that's not overwhelming, is easy top follow, and gives great resource material to fall back upon. It allows someone who may be overwhelmed to have a guide to draw upon.

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    Christian Johnson

    This is yet another module I wish I had the opportunity to take years ago. Much of what is covered I was forced to learn by trial and error, as I would wager is the case for most of us.

    Two of the 12 skills resonated with me the most as needing work after I assessed myself: Planning to Provide Motivation and Balance in Life and Energy Management for Health and Performance. I need so much work in both that I am going to complete an essay for each, to set myself up to begin that work, then submit one.

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      Rocco Dominic, III

      I agree, I wish this would be a required type of training of supervisors. being able to recognize self-management and stress relief skill would be a great help in dealing with out stress and that of our deputies.

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    Roanne Sampson

    I would have to say learning about the 12 self management skills was very enlightening. I learned that I have to continue building and practicing these skills in order for it to become easier. It is very important to take care of ourselves in every way. In recent years, I have found my purpose and it is an incredible feeling. I do, however, need to work on life planning and time priority management.

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      Donnie

      I concur. I already practice time management but could stand to refine some of my life planning. It’s hard to balance priorities between work and family. I do put family first and am fortunate that my boss encourages this but there also implied tasks that have to be addressed. I still have to pay the bills.

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    Royce Starring

    This module present 12 skills of self management. Each one builds of each other. Grounding in the one that I would say is the foundation of 12 skills of self management. Being grounded builds strength to maintain resilience to reset quickly. This important in peaceful state of mind.

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    Rocco Dominic, III

    The 12 self-management skills were very informative and enriching. These skills need to be practiced built upon to get easier. Coming close to the end of my career makes me realize I have to start working more on life goals than career.

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    Burke

    Some of the management skills hit home for me in this module. While I strive to be the best officer and leader in my agency, I don't add the same emphasis in my personal life. I give the agency 90% which leaves the 10% for the family. This course reemphasized that I need to have more balance in my life.

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      chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

      I agree with you, when we have a passion about something such as our job, we do tend to misuse the things that really matters to us, which is family. I'm also trying to make sure I balance my work life and personal life correctly.

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      Samantha Reps

      I couldn't agree more. I fell this should be brought up to the new hires as I've seen time and time again new staff devoting so much time to the agency and not as much time focusing on home.

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    Lance Landry

    I am not going to lie. I really struggled with this module, but did discover that in my life and career one fact is definite. I excel in some of the self-management skills and need quite a bit of work in others. All of the skills are co-mingled and each affects other skills. Mastering each will ultimately make me a better officer, husband, father, and person.

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      Major Stacy Fortenberry

      Lance I found this module a little weak. Perhaps it has to be for one could spent months covering 12 self help areas in depth. One area that did peak my interest and has me thinking more on is purpose and vision. I plan on writing my 5 year vision this weekend.

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      jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

      Lance, I will have to agree with you. I also struggled with this module and found myself not really sure what to take notes on. One thing that did help me was actually reading about it in the Every Officer is a Leader book. It outlined the module a little better for me.

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    Donnie

    Law enforcement experience more stress than most other professions which puts our well-being at risk. Following this 12 step program can help cope with them. I am a huge supporter of time management and believe it allows me to address the most important things first. When I do this I have more time to spend doing the things I love versus what I like. I already do many of these things. I just never did them in any order.

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      wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

      I agree I am a huge supporter of time management as well. As I got older in life and in my career things I learned to address and take care of the most important things first.

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    McKinney

    The opening of the session with the video presentation with Tasha Eurich, was rather exciting when she put things into perspective on how we think and know ourselves. The numbers she provided that only 10 to 15 percent of the individuals within their study group was genuinely self-aware. I have always felt that I was balanced with who I was until I looked further into the session. Knowing the introspective if I understood the word correctly enables us to explore ways of developing ourselves to reduce various factors, including stress. After thinking through the session, I have decided to reapproach some of the skills mentioned to build a stronger foundation with my professional and personal life.

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      When I watched her section I was reminded a a few former coworkers who had very high opinions of themselves. That is not to say they felt they were better than anyone else, but they often felt they were really great at what they did when the truth is they were average at best. They had experience but didn't always make great decisions, lacked self-motivation, and often just worried about putting their time in. I have always wanted to make sure I was not like that. Some of the self assessments and tips in this module help to take a true look at who I am and not who I think I am.

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      michael-beck@lpso.net

      I also liked the opening video and found that in order for me to grow my introspective techniques need to change. I will start to ask myself WHAT more often than the alternative WHY.

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    Major Stacy Fortenberry

    In career planning not only did I like the statement about finding mentors so you don't fall under the Peter principle but it also mentions being a mentor yourself. Help guide those under your trust and prepare them for their next promotion. The section also briefly mentions getting mentors not from just with in your career but also from different aspects of your life. That is an important aspect as it will give you different perspectives and help balance you as a whole.

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    Lieutenant John Champagne

    The 12 self-management skills showed me different areas I can work on in my life and career. Some areas I need more work on than others; time and priority management is one area I can use some work. As a supervisor, I have seen myself with 3-4 different priorities that came from the top. Everything we wanted to do and had prioritized took a back seat to the new priorities. This can be tough, but the sooner you realize what your purpose is each day, the easier it is to re-prioritize your missions and get them accomplished.

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      cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

      I agree with working on time and priority management. I also need to do a much better job. I don't have a good balance and really need to change the way I go about every day life. This module made me realize how important it is. I am going to start marking out my day and see if this helps.

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        mtroscla@tulane.edu

        Courses like this do make you look inward and reflect on how you react to crisis and stress.

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    jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

    While undertaking this module of instruction into the 12 self-management skills, I found that as I was watching each section, I would ask myself if this was an area I needed to improve on. To answer that question honestly, I would say that each skill is something that requires constant reflection. I would say that I am deficient in each of these areas in one or another or in some kind of way. Hopefully by learning about these skills I will be able to identify areas of needed improvement and work on these areas so I can be a better, person, husband, father and leader. Achieving a balance in the process.

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    chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

    In Module 7, learning about the 12 self management skills was very insightful. Knowing the more you practice and develop each skill, the easier it will be to develop the next one. It was good to learn that the skills are a perspective to give you of your life. I plan to utilize these skills in my every day leadership role to bring to my peers.

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    I felt this module was very informative and can benefit me greatly in the setting of priorities and especially the setting of a life plan before the setting of a career plan. I have seen many co-workers who define themselves by the job. Early in my career I would often forgo my own leisure or even family in an effort to "prove myself" and try to make sure my supervisors knew I was completely committed to being a team player. Now that I have a 7 year old son I realize my career is important in my life, but it is not the most important thing in my life. The last seven years I have focused on making sure my family is first and I have outside interests. I completed my Bachelor Degree and looked to this as my next educational challenge to better myself. Each of the skills discussed helps to contribute to making the individual a more rounded complete person and will strengthen the pursuit of becoming magnanimous.

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    cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

    This was a good module. I feel like I learned a lot from the self management skills. I especially like skill #2 Centering. Your center is your calm place in the eye of whatever storm you are facing. Over the years I feel like I have remained centered during high stressed situations. This module was also a reminder that I need to work on time and priority management. I don’t always have a good balance in my life. I often get caught up with my work which pretty much consumes my life. I need to start following a schedule.

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      guttuso_fa@jpso.com

      I need to work on my time management as well. It is probably one of my biggest weaknesses. I try to do to many things at once. After watching his module I think I definitely need to focus my attention on one thing at a time as much as possible. Centering will definitely help with this also.

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      Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

      I agree with your views on both aspects mentioned, I too believe I have always been able to find my center even with multiple O.I.S. I have been unfortunate to be involved in. The issue of time management I believe is pretty systematic for our profession with the multiple hats most of us have to wear in our departments, with many task needing attention. All of which our given to us with the preconceived notion that they are all priority #1.

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    mtroscla@tulane.edu

    Mindfulness and emotional management are subjects that are alien to most law enforcement training divisions. Perhaps law enforcement as a culture could stand to benefit from including this type of training in the on-boarding process.

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      sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

      I agree, that goes toward training the Rookie along with the old timers. I found the information extremely valuable and be putting it to use in my life.

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    michael-beck@lpso.net

    This module made me think about the priorities I have set in my life or my purpose and vision. I want to be the best husband, father, and supervisor I can. How I can do that is up to me. I know, for some, that this may be a mixed up set of priorities, but my job is not as important as my family so it comes last. I love my children and I hope to be the best role model I can, but I also realize they will grow up to have families and careers of their own; leaving my wife and me. So the first thing on my list is being the best husband for her. My take-away is that as my life changed, my priorities evolved. I used to be more career focused, but that lead to stress at work which spilled to my personal life. I have become better as de-stressing and have refocused my efforts in being a better person and family man, which I believe may make me a better leader.

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      steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

      I agree Mike, I witnessed many people speak their last words including my mother. None of them ever said they wished they would have done better at work. When we focus on balance in all aspects we will be better at all aspects.

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      McKinney

      I enjoyed your perspective. When we grow, our priorities change for various reasons. I agree that finding certain balances as you used the example of de-stressing will benefit us in becoming better, which can include our leadership attributes.

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    guttuso_fa@jpso.com

    Watching this video, I did a lot of introspection and realized how much more I could be doing to make my personal and professional life better. And most of it seems so simple and easy. I will definitely put some of the practices in this module to use. The one quote that really stuck out to me was in the last video. "You don't get in life what you want ladies and gentleman, you get what you are, not what you want."

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      cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

      Yes this lesson was really good and made me realize that i have so things to work on as well. It's amazing how we can think that we have it all together when we really don't.

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    This is a good set of skills to help you as a leader. It was an excellent refresher to remind yourself of the skills we all need to do. Of this list, I often time need to center myself back around so I can focus and get back on track.

    In this article, I could not agree more with the lack of planning that we all do. I look at this course that I am in as part of the non-planned things in my life. I always thought that I would have gone back to get my master’s degree years ago, shortly after my graduation. I am proud to be going back to school; I just wish it would not have taken this long to reengage.

    As we look at the skill of career planning, that changed for me with this job, as the police chief. I always envisioned in my mind that I would be doing emergency management when I retired or was not able to be a police officer anymore. With school safety, emergency management planning is ninety percent of what I do. I am glad I planned, by having a multi-discipline approach to this field. However, I wish though I would have been able to see this bigger picture a long time ago

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      anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

      I agree, many situations occur and cause us as leaders to get off track, but we need to know how to bounce back quickly, to continue leading our followers

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    sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

    The 12 skills really had me thinking of where i could find self improvement. There's be day's where i admitting got off center and wasnt able to recenter myself. Also im guilty to be short sighted and put all my energy into the furthering myself in my career, while not always planning for my personal relationships. This module i will definitly take to heart and will use my notes to center myself once stress and anxiety takes over. I particularly liked Mr. Marshall Goldsman Rules a Happy Life.

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    Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

    This lesson opened my eyes and my mind to a lot of things I thought I had figured out and felt I was pretty strong on. I have always seen myself as grounded and centered but after some introspection, I can even still use work on both of these skills. The skill on Educational planning really hit home for me, I started this profession after failing out of college when pursuing my Bachelor's degree with the intention of returning to school to finish my last 3 semesters to reach my degree...that was 17 years ago now. I have also allowed the career drive to consume much of my personal life and have made personal life decisions that I am not proud of. I plan to start fresh from skill #1 and build a greater foundation and hopefully excel through all skills throughout the rest of my time at the department and life.

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    cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

    This module makes you think of every aspect of your life and what you need to work on. It is easy to think and say that you have everything together in life. If you don't take a look at your life you can never improve yourself. If you never improve your self you will never reach any of the goals in life that you want to reach.

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      blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree with you. I was so focused on my career path that I placed my personal life on the back burner. After I reached my career goal, I looked back at the things I missed out in my own life. I now have a different outlook on my life and career path.

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      self awareness is huge. I like a lot of others lost sight of this pretty easily while focusing on achieving my career goals. Now as a father, I understand the struggles my dad went through when I was growing up and I'm doing my best to learn from his hardships.

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    anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

    This lecture has taught me that in the most stressful situation, I should be grounded so I can stay focus while making my decisions. also operating under a more balanced life can help make my profession less stressful.

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    steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

    When you finally decide that management of your life to a balance between work and personal is a great moment. it take determination to realize that balance is the only thing that is sustainable. Over time your life or career will balance it self, with or without your terms. After loosing much needed weight, I recently decided to quite smoking after 25 years two weeks ago. Peers asked if I thought it was a good decision to try that during this course. It wasn't only good, it was great. Sometimes we think thinks help with stress and then realize they can cause it. Removing stress from both professional and person life is very rewarding.

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      dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

      I saw that you slimmed down a whole bunch last time I saw you at Nobiles. Congrats and also good job on the not smoking. Something I need to do......again. Maybe in 6 weeks.

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    ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

    This module really got my attention. I have struggled with stress and tension for years and having to fight high blood pressure and cholesterol as a result. I will be implementing these techniques immediately! These are also great tools for new officers to implement as they are starting out to avoid a lot of the issues most of us have gone through.

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    The lecture reminded me of how I have let many things in my professional life decay, because too many times, I am going from fire to fire, instead of prioritizing by true priorities, instead of who is complaining more. As for the personal life, I love my wife and she has put up with the emergencies that were and those that weren't from those phone calls, while at dinner, sleeping and so forth. We are in a profession where the landscape can change quickly, but our addiction to adrenaline or accomplishment has to go.

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      Adam Gonzalez

      Thank you for your candidness! I feel the same way. And, not just with our positions as supervisors but sometimes life in general. But, yes, especially with work where putting out fires seems to be the bulk of what we do. And, yes, our addiction to adrenaline and accomplishments have to be put in check compared to what is most important in life with the most worthwhile investment!

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    blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

    In this module, I learned that I still need improvement in some areas of the "self-management skills." Since I first began taking the leadership classes a couple of years ago, I have been working on my leadership skills and still have a ways to go. I wish I could have gained this knowledge before I became a supervisor. These skills will help me tremendously in the future.

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      dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

      You and I have been friends for years now. I first met you a long time ago when you were working as a firefighter. I think you made the right career jump because look at you, man, in a short time you've accomplished a lot!! We've had our differences, but those are in the past, and I accept blame for them. Always remember to be humble and learn from yours and other people's mistakes and don't make the same ones. It's exciting to work alongside you, hopefully for several more years to come.

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      dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree with you, Beau. After going through this module and doing a self-assessment, I know what areas I need to work on.

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    dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

    As an officer of 20 years, many officers with similar time in whatever their position is tend to become comfortable with how things are for them. The other, bigger majority are growing with the job as it also grows. They are hungry for more information and strive to be better and more successful at what they do. These officers, in my opinion, possess many of the 12 self-management skills. I’m not saying that the officers who I first mentioned do not, the officers in the latter category are simply more aware of what they need to do and have a strong desire to better themselves. Their motivating goals and desire to have a successful career path are the foundation for their success.

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    dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

    There are a few different self-management skills, I believe I can work on. The two that stood out most to me were stress management and energy management for health and performance. I know we blame it on the job, but there are definitely things that we can do on our own to better manage the stress and manage our health. I look forward to using the resources presented in this module to work toward these goals.

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    I wish someone would have taught me the 12 self management skills 19 years ago when I first started my career. This module helped me identify areas that I need to focus more on to become the most affective leader I can be. One of the area's that I struggle with is time and priority management. Trying to find the correct balance between my case load but also supervising other detectives case's as well as finding the appropriate amount of time to spend with the family. As I continue to grow as a leader hopefully a better balance will be found.

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      clouatre_kj@jpso.com

      I agree that I wish I would have received this training years when I first started my career. Although I may not have paid enough attention the areas that I need to at this point.

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      mmoscona@floodauthority.org

      I totally agree Mike. I my case it's over 40 years and two marriages and a a horrible relationship with one son. I'm on my third marriage and work at balance every day.

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    cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

    Learning about the 12 Self Management Skills was interesting. I think there are two areas I need to give strengthen which are stress management and time and priority management; for me, they seem to go hand in hand. I tend to try and accomplish more tasks in a day than time allows, in both my personal and professional life, then beat myself up for not getting it all done.

    I don't carve out enough time for my own self care and stress management, as I had once done before I had a husband, kids, and career. No one is stopping me from doing this but me. I need to make both a priority. When I feel drained or stressed it definitely shows in my attitude and performance. I think by better managing my stress, time, and priorities I can feel more satisfied and productive in my personal and professional domains.

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    clouatre_kj@jpso.com

    Stress Management and Energy Management are the two areas in this module that were the most relavent to me where I currently am in my career and my personal life. I thought this module provided some great reminders of ways that I can manage both of these areas of my life better. As a husband and father, I want to make sure I am phsyically and mentally strong for my children and wife. The stress that I carry over from work to home and vice versa is definitely effecting my health. This module reminded me that I need to work on these skills to be a better leader, husband and father.

    There were some other great points made around Time and Priority Management that are very relatable to my role right now as well. When I am in the office it seems like there are constant fires being presented which gets me off schedule. Managing my time at work better will allow me to be more effective and organized leader.

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      Thank you for sharing your personal reflection and I couldn’t agree with you more. I do find time for some exercise and relaxation, but not near enough and sometimes it is at the expense of family time rather than work time. So, I agree that time and priority management are intertwined with Stress and Energy Management. I think if we can become better at these, we will inevitably lead by example and be able to mentor others in helping them be better organized and prioritize the right way. It should always be family first!

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    I feel all 12 of the self-management skills are important and should be addressed if a leader wants to be effective.There are a few skills that I don't even think about when addressing self-management. This module made me realize there a some skills that I need to work on that I have overlooked.

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    dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

    This module made me reflect on myself and address the areas in my life that need improvement. I think the best thing about this module is how it shows you ways to improve each of the twelve skills.

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    dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

    These 12 skills are important to make sure you have a balanced life. i believe that this is something that we need to incorporate in new hire orientation, so it doesn't take people years to figure out. Starting new hires out on the right foot and hopefully not coming to that road block in their career. these can help them overcome any road block.

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    Lt. Mark Lyons

    I found this training module to be very informative. I believe that each of the self management skills discussed in this module are very important tools that can be used for training our staff during new hire orientation and during annual in-service training. Unfortunately, there inst very much of this type of training currently available for our staff to participate in.

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      Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

      I was thinking the same thing; if these skills are introducing earlier in a recruits career it will be a benefit to them and to the agency for their future.

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      Robert Schei

      I agree Mark that new staff do not have the same training opportunities and at times even understand why they need it and I think that is part of the answer. Information is always available if you only take the time to look for it. As we develop in our careers we begin to have different goals and aspirations and then we start to put the work in. When we are new we need to understand the FTO training and the basics don't do this but do this instead. However there are several key pieces of information that we have all learned. What my organization did was create a manual with veteran tips. Information that takes years to learn or experience and we provide it right up front. Some take it and learn others it takes more time to develop that desire.

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    Adam Gonzalez

    "Yesterday, I was clever, and so I wanted to change the world. Today, I am wise so I'm changing myself"- Rumi. Of all of the self-management skills taught during this module, the above quote, as shared by the very first Ted Talk speaker. I find this to be especially true for those of us that have been blessed to be promoted within our organizations. Contrary to contemporary thinking, before setting out to change what we now have "authority" to change, true leaders begin with themselves!

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      Lt. Marlon J Shuff

      I totally agree. As leaders, we should continually strive to be a better version of ourselves today than we were yesterday.

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    This lecture about the 12 skills to strive for in self management strike a balance between life, work, and leisure time. The ability to maintain personal happiness, reduce burnout, keep in shape, and have a good family life is paramount. If you can not take care of your self, you definitely can not be of service to others. The ability to accomplish this requires discipline and and a definitive plan to succeed

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      Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

      Michael, your comments is correct, we have to take care of ourselves first and foremost. Make your plan and stick with it to reach your goals.

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      Ryan Manguson

      Agree with your comments. We do need to strike a balance between work, life and leisure. Although, I feel that many us struggle with that immensely. The skills from this module are all useful to put things in prospective for us and the need to have a healthy balance of each.

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    mmoscona@floodauthority.org

    What an eye opening module. I wish someone had introduced me to these 12 skills early in my career. I have had a pretty successful 40+ year career but my personal life has been pretty much a train wreck with 2 failed marriages and one son who barely speaks to me. So far so good on the third and these skills will sure help and I intend to use them.

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    wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

    While all 12 Self-Management Skills presented by Dr. Terry Anderson are beneficial to leaders, there are a few that probe at me and were needed in my career. As stated, often people do not realize they need to release stress until they have become so overwhelmed, having to find a way to rewind. In my organization I tell the guys all the time public safety is a challenging career. The day to day routine can change without a minute's notice. Take time to spend time with your wife, children, and grandchildren. Worship together and enjoy family time as much as possible.

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    If you need a road map to change then this is the module for you. All the information is well presented with good examples. The trick to all of it is implementing and staying on course. None of these skills are real surprises but they can help make the difference in your life if you allow them to.

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      Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

      Yes, I use Skill#11, whenever I'm really stress from work I use my gym time to whine down and regroup. It's been a practice that I never look at as the main help that has gotten me through some rough times.

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        I have done the same thing. Taking time to go to the gym for just an hour, an hour of no other thoughts but just working out clearing your mind. I believe it can also help get rid of the cortisol which is built up from stress.

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        Deputy Mitchell Gahler

        Concentrating on both my mental and physical fitness has been an area that I have enjoyed, and the gym has helped tremendously with relieving stress and developing a tactical edge. I have been lacking in this area for the past couple of months, which I have observed an elevated level of stress and decline in my physical health. It's interesting to notice how important this has been in my life for so many years, and how I've changed in these capacity's due to the lack of my attendance. This area is definitely important for me moving forward that I need to focus on.

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    Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

    As I watched this module and learned about the 12 Self- Management Skills I was surprised at when the skills were being explained, how many of them talked about stress management. It dawned on me that one of the biggest priorities in your life is stress management.

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    Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

    The twelve skills mentioned in this module are important regarding the balance of life. This would work effectively in our agency with recruitment of new employees. I have always assumed and believed that when new employees embark upon their new career with a proper and fair beginning, that impact will always have a lasting impression on them throughout their profession.

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    Lt. Marlon J Shuff

    When I began my law enforcement career 21 years ago, I wish back then that I would have followed each one of these 12 “Self-Management Skills. Over time, I learned the importance of a couple of these skills the hard way. Nonetheless, at this stage in my life and career, I understand the importance of self-management in becoming a healthier, more productive, balanced leader.

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    Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

    This module was interesting with the explanation of the 12 skills that Dr. Terry Anderson delivered. To use these skills properly one would have to understand the differences and how to incorporate them into their lives and careers. Considering Dr. Anderson stated these skills aren’t taught at a younger age as leaders we should expose our younger officers to these skills as soon as they start their careers. It would benefit the new officer and the agency as a whole.

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      Lt. Joseph Flavin

      I agree that agencies should expose younger officers to these skills early on. I think this is something that can be taught at the academy or if not there, at the agency incorporated into an FTO program.

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      Sergeant James Schueller

      I thought the same thing as I was watching, especially after Dr. Anderson made the comment- I wish I had seen/heard this SO much earlier in my career. The younger group coming in will definitely benefit from having this sooner than later if we can make that happen. As you said, it would help them AND the agency move forward.

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      Eduardo Palomares

      Excellent point. I wish I was exposed to these skills at the beginning of my career in law enforcement. It would have been very beneficial to my personal and professional life. I was informally introduced to centering last year by one of my role models. With the mindset of "every officer is a leader" it is critical for us to make our colleagues, supervisors and subordinates aware of these 12 Self-Management skills. Like you said it would greatly benefit all new officers and the organization as a whole. I will make the pledge of improving each one of these 12 skills to become a better person. The concepts in these lecture showed the importance of using the skills to become more productive at home and at work.

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    This module was a great module to conduct a reality and health check. So many of us become so busy with our day to day tasks that many of us do not make enough time for our selves and our families. We are wore down by the day to day grind of our work assignments and the stress that accompanies those assignments. Getting thrown off center as one of the skills states can easily happen. I know for me I continually have full schedules day after day and I have found myself sometimes just stopping to try and take a deep breath just try and relax for a few minutes. I am going to use some of the suggestions in some of the skill sets such as prioritizing, set an exercise plan and just making time to do stuff away from work.

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      Sergeant Chad Blanchette

      Good points Sheriff. I am guilty of putting myself behind the job and getting a plan in place to go forward needs to be a priority. Thanks!

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    Deputy Mitchell Gahler

    I appreciated this module as it discussed the 12 "Self-Management" skills, as they identified, "skills of living and working effectively, and the skills of living on purpose, instead of by accident." It’s interesting to view these skills sets and look back at past situations in my life where I could have utilized these in my career and in my daily life. Skill 8: Career Planning setting motivating goals has been a focus of mine since I entered law enforcement, as I aspire to be an effective team member and develop skills for individual career development. This module provides more positive information that I can apply during my career and in my daily life. It also provides areas of personal development where I need to improve in, both professionally and personally.

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    Lt. Joseph Flavin

    "Live on purpose, not by accident," was a great quote with a deep meaning. The 12 self-management skills were great reminders that we need to take care of our well-being; not only personally but professionally as well. The purpose and vision specification really caught my attention. I've started to create my own purpose and vision statement to provide a more clear outlook 5 years from now for my career. While I have long-term goals and aspirations, I like the idea of setting something up 5 years at a time. A skill I know to work on is time and priority management. I often agree to do so many things that I sometimes find myself scrambling to finish them as the deadline approaches.

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      I think 5 year plans (rather than just long term) is a great idea. If an officer desires to be chief, that's great. But they should take it one step at a time and build a foundation. Maybe start with FTO, Sergeant, Lieutenant, education, etc.

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    Sergeant James Schueller

    I like the beginning quote in this lecture that said "Live on purpose not by accident." It was a nice and fitting introduction to the 12 skills outlined in the module. I think the 12 skills provide for the balance between our professional and personal lives, especially when looking back on my own and seeing where I have placed too much emphasis over the years. I really saw value in skill #5, specifically "Plan to live within a set of personal values. Appreciate diversity of values that exists in others and understand how values that clash result in conflict." One of the biggest problems today (politics, social media, life choices) is that people by and large do NOT appreciate the diversity in values, to the point where its their way or else...Very disheartening, but also an opportunity for us to live by our values and realize our job is not to change others but to be OK with the difference. Another area I appreciate was #8- Career Planning and Setting Motivating Goals. This is an area that I have worked on throughout my career, and still hope to do more before my time is done. And finally skill #12 has and is important for all we do- Positive Mental Attitude. Good outlook to have when you think to face an apparent problem and see it as a positive challenge.

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    This module caused me to have a revelation as I reflected on the 12 skills presented and realized that I, all too often, ask myself “why” rather than “what can I do?” It’s actually funny thinking about Simon Sinek’s “why” in relation to this module. They may seem opposite at first glance, but I think people, myself certainly included, put too much effort into trying to explain or figure out that in which we have no comprehension for language…emotions. But these 12 skills that Dr. Anderson presented really clarified for me why I have changed over the years. My beliefs have changed due to my education and experience and the application of that which I have learned has impacted outcomes I just never realized until now. Having clarity of my “why” I do what I do is just as vital as understanding “what” is important to me and having a prioritized plan to get me where I would like to be.

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      I agree with this post. I also associated with the "WHY" vs. "WHAT" concept. I recently met with a shift to discuss some changes in our COVID procedures. After the meeting, I felt that I could have done better in the way I presented information. I frequently review things in my mind afterwards in an effort to be introspective. As always, I had a feeling that I could have done better. I spent a considerable amount of time mulling it over and even asked a fellow commander who was present how I did. In the end, I spent valuable time and emotional energy on something that I never really figured out. This module taught me that I cannot find reason for my motives or feelings. furthermore, I learned that in asking WHY, all you're really doing is creating alternate facts that relate to a past experience. This does not lead to answers. What I should have done was acknowledge my feelings about a topic and then figure out WHAT I can do in the future to do better. Only by asking WHAT I can do, will I ever learn and move forward.

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      Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

      I thought of Sinek's TED talk as well! I agree, two different topics on two different planes. These 12 skills seem to come down to health and time management. How many times do we tell ourselves, "I'll do just this one more thing and then I'll take some time off". Unfortunately, many of us never take that time off.

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    Kyle Phillips

    This module brought my attention to skills that I had not really put much emphasis on as of yet throughout my career, suggesting I have not been living as intentionally as I thought. I liked the idea of setting what I would call intermediate goals, such as a five year plan as suggested. Not too far down the road to be forgotten about, yet far enough out to make you stay vigilante in your efforts to obtain. I will use these skills as I work towards continual self improvement within my life.

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      Maja Donohue

      The concept of living intentionally is really powerful, though like yourself, I’ve got some work to do to improve in this aspect as well. It is easy to get caught up in everything we think we have to do instead of focusing on what we really ought to be doing. The 5-year plan is long enough to make us reach beyond our comfort zone yet short enough to keep us motivated.

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    I enjoyed this module immensely. The introduction video by Tasha Eurich, caught me off guard. I always considered myself as being introspective. She pretty much burst that bubble but she made some poignant points. The first is that self awareness is made up of several factors; how we see ourselves, how we fit in, and how others see us. Prior to this, I always thought of this as a purely personal process. Eurich also mentioned that people who ask why put themselves is a trap that only lead to paralysis and more stress. I immediately thought about a recent incident where I spent a considerable about of time and personal energy to find out why I felt the way I did about something I had done. In the end, I never really found the answer. Instead, I should have acknowledged my feelings and thought about what I could do in the future to do better. I could have really avoided a lot of needless "emotional Hell" as Eurich put it, over my life time if I had just focused on the right question to ask. The remaining 12 skills outlined by Dr. Long really do focus on the individual. We spend so much time looking out for others (family, friends, community members and co-workers) that we forget about ourselves. I thought it was interesting that the skills built on themselves. I might think that I have my career goals figured out but if that conflicts with my actual personal purpose or vision, I am setting myself up for failure either personally or professionally. The 12 Skills provide clarity, direction, a strong purpose, a grounded center and built in stress relief measures. I think that Skill #4 (specifying your personal purpose and vision) is especially applicable. This concept was discussed in a previous module and this particular module provides further insight into why doing this is so important. It's easier to move a head and accomplish personal goals if your vision and purpose are built on your beliefs (Skill #3) and your values (Skill #5). This in itself, is another example of why you cannot focus on one skill to the detriment of the others if you want to lead a successful and stress free life.

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    Ryan Manguson

    This module on the 12 self-management skills was thought was very good. There is no question that each of us can identify areas within these 12 skills that we can improve. I particularly like the Ted Talk which talked about changing the why questions you have (past thinking) to what questions (forward thinking) . That mind shift of changing your thought process from dwelling on the past to action oriented forwarding thinking is an excellent technique and mind shift.

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    Eduardo Palomares

    I wish I knew about the 12 Self-Management Skills when I first entered the police academy over 12 years ago to have better handled stress. In this module, the 12 Self-Management Skills presented by Dr. Terry Anderson were very beneficial to my personal and professional life. To be specific, grounding and centering gave me clarity and opened my eyes to what is important in terms of stress management. The correlation between my professional and personal are rooted on grounding and centering, which made me realize there has to be a proper balance between physical and mental health to proactively engage in activities to reduce and prevent stress. It terms of physical health, I realized that I need to maintain proper fitness levels to give my body the best fighting chance, should I ever be critically injured on or off the job. This also gave me direction on why mental health is very important. As leaders, it is important to be aware of our mental and physical in order to nurture personal and professional relationships. Grounding allows leaders to reset in order to maintain a state of resilience during high stress and critical incidents. Officers will emulate this state of calmness, allowing them to develop their own skills in these areas. It is also important to constantly speak with our people about these 12 skills. I will be practicing more meditation, try to get better sleep, increase my nutrition and exercise more often.

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    Sergeant Chad Blanchette

    Too often, I think we put the job before ourselves. This module was a good reminder that by taking care of ourselves physically, emotionally, psychologically and spiritually will serve us better in our personal and professional lives.

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      Christopher Lowrie

      Great points Sgt. Blanchette. Dr. Anderson provided some awesome tools to help keep our lives in check. Staying balanced in this profession is key to success.

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      Sergeant Durand Ackman

      It is so easy to put ourselves last. Much easier to focus on our career, our families, friends, etc. You are correct though, we need to take care of ourselves so that we can better care for everything else. I too need a reminder like this class

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      Marshall Carmouche

      You're correct about taking care of ourselves! If we let ourselves become run down, stressed and chaotic will not be beneficial to anyone. After listening to this lesson I will use the stress relief techniques discussed.

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    Jarvis Mayfield

    I believe that once the person is centered they are able to focus on other skills. Being focus and having a vision is a major fact in planning anything. The 12 skills are very valuable to a person's life

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    Maja Donohue

    I identified several skills in this module that I need to work on. For example, I am terrible about admitting that I am under stress and often don’t acknowledge it to myself either (Skill # 10-Stress Management). I don’t think this is particularly healthy and I can look back at my career and identify multiple instances where I should have asked for help but didn’t. I also recognize that I need to spend less time in my “career box” (Skill # 7-Educational Planning and Setting Motivational Goals) to find more balance in my life. There was a lot of good information in this module, so it would be easy to get overwhelmed at first. However, if we look at it as a process and a journey or a commitment to ourselves, it becomes easier to process and adopt one step at a time.

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    Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

    Eurich’s discussion during her TED talk was very compelling. I found it interesting that 80-90% of us don’t have an accurate identity of our self-awareness.
    I was also interested in the health portion of this module, specifically when the study was done about police officers heart rates while on shift as well as leaving shift. I’d be curious about my cardiac health, especially while at work, maybe a fitbit is in my future.

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    Robert Schei

    What am I doing now that is making me a better person, husband, father, leader is so much more valuable to me then why am I not a better person, husband, father and leader. Little performance changes to how we think certainly make a big difference. I have tried to apply this principle as often as I could lately and I have been surprised by its impact. I was trying to explain to my son how to complete a certain assignment for school and I asked him 3 times why don't you understand what I am saying. Then like magic I asked - what can I do to help you understand. He provided me the information that I was lacking, 30 seconds later he was working on his assignment with clarity.

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      Cynthia Estrup

      I think this is such a powerful statement and realization. Sometimes, as the leaders we perceive ourselves to be, we think we know what our people need. So much, that we often do not ask them if their needs are being met, or what they might need to be more successful. Even with the best intentions, we can unintentionally devalue someone with our best intentions. Words, and the way we use them, really do have so much power.

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      I like how you phrased that logic about your son and homework. It's easy to get frustrated with our kids after a long day of our own. Trying to reach him or our followers at their level is a good idea. What sounds common sense to me might not be for someone else.

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    Christopher Lowrie

    Dr. Terry Anderson provided some great advice. The awareness skill of grounding hit home for me. I could benefit by living in the here and now and not thinking about other things while people are engaging with me.

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    Sergeant Paul Gronholz

    It's amazing how important it is for us as leaders to have a clear vision for our future. That clarity of vision will not only help us, but also the people we lead. I gotta be honest, I've never really mapped out my goals in life but have been simply living from one day to the next. Life got busy for me quickly and my wife and I started a family at a young age. Things have turned out just fine but I have to wonder if I had established earlier a vision for my life if I'd be in the same place I am right now or if I'd be in another town or even a different profession.

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    Sergeant Durand Ackman

    This module is definitely an eye opener. I remember when I watched this video taking the ICLD courses. This video pointed out several areas I need to improve upon. Seeing it again is a reminder of the work I still have to do. Stress management and positive mental attitude are probably my two biggest areas I need to work on. I hadn't seen the video with Tasha Eurich previously. Her comment about self analysis being able to trap you in a mental hell is spot on. Her comments about asking what instead of why were a great reminder. I've heard this before and it works very well. For some reason it is natural to ask why. I've proven to myself many times over that it is more successful to ask what instead of why. I just need to get back in that habit and hopefully I can maintain it this time

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      Gregory Hutchins

      The immense power of ‘why’ as it relates to self-reflection and how just a change in the focus to ‘what’ immediately shifts the lens is interesting. The examples of how easily one can enable the subconscious brain to invent things that seem true. Taking a solitary event and spinning into a definition of one’s relationship is ruminating at its best. Being grounded and centered, that ability to slow down and reflect on one’s values and beliefs goes a long way to fight the demons inside.

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    Cynthia Estrup

    During this lesson I found it interesting they spoke about planning and balance in life. I agree this topic is lacking in our K-12 setting, but even as our future leaders begin to move up the management track, I wonder if they are in the field they are passionate about, or if they are just moving up. There is greater focus on advancement and moving up the career track, and less focus on where individual strengths are and developing areas of specific passion. It seems people are entering the field not because they are passionate about the job or calling to work in public safety, but rather look at it as being just a job. I think some of our recruitment efforts could be better served attending high school career fairs and really explain all the ins and outs of the career.

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      Jacqueline Dahms

      I agree with your assessment. I see this more evident in corrections as a stepping stone into law enforcement. Working in a jail is just a job to move into a licensed position. In fact a lot of metro area counties will require deputies to work in the jail prior to working on the streets. This is frustrating for me because of the work and effort put into someone. There are times when that person realizes they don’t want to be on the streets and come back to the jail, but that rarely happens. Having more development earlier in their careers and education would be highly beneficial. At least I think I would have benefitted from it more.

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      Well put Cynthia. I think we're wiring our kids and ourselves to constantly have something going on or somewhere to be. That lifestyle seems to contradict this lesson. Finding a way to relax and focus sounds very nice. I just don't know how to get there.

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    Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

    There were several skills presented in this lecture that provide us great leadership skills enhancement. Personally, I found a path forward in time blocking and priority management. Being able to time block my day allows for greater focus on administrative tasks and responding to emails while allowing my employees the opportunity for discussion during open blocks.

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      I am going to try the time block thing too, what can it hurt right? Days go by like minutes most days and it is frustrating to look back at the end of a day to only scratch your head on what you accomplished. Making appointments you stand by might be just what is needed.

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      I was in the same boat as you. Not blocking out times, let to me chasing butterflies all the time. One thought would trigger another and I would have a half dozen or more things partially done, and most poorly done. Managing my work time, which I'm still very much working on, gave me more time at home and help me start meeting some goals.

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    Samantha Reps

    This lesson opened my eyes to having to take care and making a better me. I have dedicated so much of my life to my career and stress over meaningless things.
    The video with Tasha Eurich talking about self-awareness really brought some clarity to work life. I took the most out of the stop asking why and replace it with what. Out of all the conversations I have had with staff I wish I would have done this more.

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    The skills covered in this module were all very relevant to our profession. Energy management and health performance stood out for me. Focusing on your personal health will help to avoid many other issues that arise from a stressful job.

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      Sergeant Kelly Lee

      My thoughts and comments exactly William. I posted that these 12 skills for living should be included in EVERY law enforcement skills program around the country. We need to do better on informing our new hires of these factors so they can start making lifestyle changes and adjustments early on instead of too late in their career.

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      Sgt. Shawn Wilson

      These positive lifestyle choices have numerous benefits. Departmental polices which facilitate personal health should be implemented creating a better work environment decreasing the amount of stress caused by lack of sleep (double shift after double shift), poor nutrition, exercise (sitting in a car for 16 hours a day; elevated heart rate due to the inability to relax.

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    Sergeant Matt Wieland

    I like how each of the 12 skills build upon the next, and how each is important in both our personal and professional lives. These skills are based on self-awareness, and require emotional and social intelligence to master. These skills will probably never be fully mastered, but provide a framework for living a fulfilling life in all aspects. Every day that you live is a new opportunity to make a difference, a new chance to be live better. Tasha Eurich's video stressed to me the importance of not spending too much time looking in the rear-view mirror or you might miss something ahead of you.

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      Brad Strouf

      I enjoyed Eurich's video as well. The twelve skills discussed become more easy to break down and define and therefore more attainable. This module was well done.

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    Sergeant Kelly Lee

    12 skills for living on purpose not on accident should be a required part of the curriculum for all those entering the law enforcement field. After listening to this section, I thought to myself, "if I only knew then what I know now." Most officers lives would be totally changed and they would be in a different place if we knew this before and could follow these instructions. My guess is there would be a lot more officers who would be independently happy, finding true joy in their lives and careers. Finding happiness with what they have and not with what they can't have. Looking at skill #10 stress management, this is something we all need to pay close attention to so that we can keep on eye on ourselves as well as our partners and hopefully never loose another officer to suicide which is the end result from failing to recognize this key component.

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      Andy Opperman

      Excellent point about wishing we knew then what we know now. It makes you think a lot about what we could accomplish, but on the flip side I really believe that youth hinders our ability to think as critically or as deep as we do with experience. It's the experience that shapes us to look for purpose in our life. It makes me question at what age most people find true happiness with themselves and their life in general.

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    Jacqueline Dahms

    The biggest thing I took away from this lecture was living on purpose and not by accident. I feel I have lived most of my life by my design but there are times that I can look back on and could have influenced or changed my outcomes. I feel that over my career in corrections I have become more grounded and centered. I have a strong value and belief system but I do feel that I would have benefitted having had more guidance in my early 20’s with finding my purpose. My struggles today are managing my stress, which I assume is very common in law enforcement. I have done resiliency training but I am always my biggest critic and don’t allow myself mistakes.

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    Andy Opperman

    This was a great module on how to just be great person and how to strive for constant self-improvement. I would assume that all the people involved in the command college have enough life experience to have gone through a challenging or trying time in their life really establishing their belief system. These skills need to be taught at a much younger age. They should even be part of elementary school education. Teaching our leaders the skill set to manage stress before it happens, keeping a positive mental attitude, and life balance are extremely important. I think in some people’s view a lot of these subjects are just common sense but do we really practice them? The human mind is a powerful thing and if we do not take care of our own wellbeing your thinking can lead you down a negative path, especially related to law enforcement. Just the simple fact of having a positive mental attitude can totally change your view on something negative that comes your way. I have had a number of discussions with my teenage son about looking at thinks negatively and changing his perspective into making something positive. I think in law enforcement we can all understand attitude is everything. As a leader I will take someone with a positive attitude any day over someone with talent. I also liked the idea of preparing yourself and your people for stress management before it happens. In law enforcement many times we wait too long until so much has piled on the officer, they have difficulty digging themselves out.

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    Stress and energy management were two areas of this module that resonated with me. It is hard to find that "balance" in life the higher within the organization you go. At least for me, this holds true. Not that Escaping the job in 2021 is nearly impossible unless we bury our phone in the backyard. There is always someone calling to ask a question, needs a day off, or some unforeseen "something" arose at work. Email, text messaging, phone calls, and virtual meetings occupy so much of our work lives. The pandemic surely didn't help alleviate stress for anyone either. Working remotely seemed to only encourage more need for interaction among people. As the instructor indicated, experimenting with ways to reduce stress and increase energy is probably the way to go. I guess I still need to experiment.
    Time management was another area of this lesson I could relate to. There is a lot of wasted time throughout a day merely by people stopping in to say hi. I like the idea of scheduling time blocks throughout the day in order to accomplish various tasks such as sending an email or returning phone calls.

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      I can honestly say that time management used to be a major issue for me. The idea that you mentioned about scheduling time blocks has worked wonders for me. I felt like I was often running behind or forgetting something until I started setting reminders and those blocks to make sure I was accomplishing everything. I hated always having the feeling that I wasn't doing everything that I committed to. I felt like I was better at managing my time than that, but sometimes with so many tasks on your plate, you have to keep yourself more organized in that way.

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      Timothy Sandlin

      I agree. I definitely found myself looking in the mirror in this module. Especially in regards to stress management and life balance. Great points. Better time and stress management skills are so important to help deal with the increasing demands upon a person.

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    Brad Strouf

    By breaking the skills down to 12 distinct methods, it made the ideas and the theories presented all the more approachable and achievable. I will have difficulty in finding just one to write on in the essay section since there are so many that resonated with me.

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    I often use exercise to help get rid of frustration and to assist with reducing stress. I found it interesting in the lecture how he pointed out that 20-30 minutes of exercise and deep relaxation can truly help with that. I knew that it works for me but I never thought of it as an official coping mechanism. I often feel that the exercise portion is easier for me as I often struggle with shutting my brain off from running with all of the thoughts that are most likely causing my stress. Relaxation is more of a challenge for me because of that. More time off and routinely checking in with myself is probably necessary and would allow me to relax more. This is very important to do, especially when in a leadership role. Stress can negatively effect you, which in turn can impact your team.

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    Sgt. Shawn Wilson

    Time management combined with understaffing. I have recently moved my office to a remote building within our agency which has facilitated greater efficiency. In the past with the number of personnel that would come in and just want to say hello was reducing work output by about 2-3 hours per day. Exercise, nutrition, sleep, and relaxation when combined increase our longevity with an organization continuing to promote a positive work environment; this also contributes a positive home life.

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    Major Willie Stewart

    In order to succeed and take care of your staff, plus home life, we must use the 12 skills to strive for better self management. We can have a great work life but if your family life is not in line, it will definitely spill over into your work life. We need to find the balance between the both so we can succeed in both.

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    The module outlined a lot of life skills we take for granted. It was interesting that they are presented as building off the previous skill. As we went through them and I found where I could improve, I noticed I could improve on the skills that followed. I also know people that need great adjustments in areas and likewise the remaining skills for them could be improved too. It seems knowing how much first responders are affected by this, it would be part of the curriculum in the basic course. Although, it could have been in mine but I knew everything back then and would have been day dreaming about something else.
    Goosfraba

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      "GOOSFRABA!" Anytime you can quote and Adam Sandler movie, I'm obliged to comment and "like".

      Seriously, these skills would be very helpful if they were presented in a basic academy setting. Starting off a career with the proper skill set is way more helpful than trying to fix things later on.

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    Every single skill is needed. Most of them seem so common sense. It seems we get so caught up in our daily grind that we forget to put these skills into practice. the skill that I need to work on the most is time management. This usually stems from too many distractions or trying to do too many things in one day.

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      Matthew Menard

      I feel the same way about the challenges of time management. I have found that the idea of prioritizing what needs to happen now verses what can wait as presented in the lecture helps me with that.

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      Sergeant Michael Prachel

      Time management is crucial. This topic is not only important in our careers in law enforcement, but in our daily life too. We need to prioritize and balance everything very carefully. Having the different “levels” of priority is a great method. Knowing what needs to be done and what can wait will help us when balancing multiple tasks.

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    This module was very eye opening and one of the best so far. The 12 self management skills all have great information. Maintaining a positive attitude is the hardest one for myself, but with the insight that this module provided will be very helpful. The resource at the end needs to be shared not only with the leaders in our agency but all staff members. I found it to be very informative and motivating.

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      Nicole Oakes

      I completely agree with all of the turmoil that we face within our agencies and now with public perception, this is very necessary.

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    Timothy Sandlin

    I enjoyed this module. The ability to look in the mirror and manage yourself is a great way to continually develop or reenergize yourself. the 12 skills covered help to with a framework to better focus your efforts to manage yourself and create a healthier life balance. This skill set should be required in every academy course as it is just as vital to officer safety as other tactical skills.

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    Nicole Oakes

    We, in Law Enforcement, don't really pay attention to our own needs. It was very refreshing to get a reminder that not only our body but our mind and spirit needs to be renewed daily. We deal with so much and it's also a great reminder that if you take care of yourself, mind, body and soul then the people you lead will know and follow. The 12 skills discussed made me think of my values and priorities and what is most important. I believe at some point in our career we focus more on work because we don't live an intentional lifestyle through planning. I really learned a lot in this module.

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      Ronald Smith

      NIcole
      What if we could make the values of Mind, Body, and Soul the values we instill in every new and veteran officer. There are 12 skills in this module to help guide anyone to self-awareness, look at how many are covered by education, exercise, and stress relief. We could not just save careers but how many LEO lives might we prevent being victims of suicide.

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    Gregory Hutchins

    Self-management is essential when one looks at the myriad of self-destructive things individuals in this profession experience. As seen in the military understanding, these concepts are essential to retain and support our most valuable resource. It all starts with grounding and centering. An exciting point drawn from the lesson is the importance of maintaining self-control and resetting to set a command presence under stress. Too often, it seems like an individual with years of experience, whether career or life, tends to reset more often or quicker than their younger counterparts. The challenge to an organization is the older and wiser officers tend to be in leadership roles when the younger officers in the trenches are the ones with this poor life skill. Their inability to react to and handle stress is often the root cause of complaints or dissatisfaction with the profession.

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    Matthew Menard

    I found it thought provoking to have each of these 12 self management skills pointed out in this module. I can say that I have given very little thought to most of them before now, however during the lecture portion I found that I should spend more time reflecting on myself. All too often we focus on the coming to work, doing our job, go home and repeat. I for one need to spend more time focusing on my work life balance. I started this career having people stressing the importance of life outside of work, however as I advance through promotions I find it more and more difficult to maintain that healthy balance.

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    Ronald Smith

    Self-awareness is a ladder I have been climbing for years, it is my nature to want to help people I know. I spent many years tired and stressed out with no time for my family. Whether I was coaching kids, sailors, or cops I was always hypervigilant about their success. I believed their success would lead to my promotions and the betterment of my life. I learned a valuable word that improved my home life immensely, NO, I had to use that word to spend time with my family. As I went through the 12 skills I could see into the past and all the changes I made to improve my life, and with my life, in order, I was able to help others without sacrificing my downtime. I am still working on the self-talk but I do play golf and that causes me stress and doubt all the time.

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    Marshall Carmouche

    I think law enforcement professionals are under a tremendous amount of stress. I was especially interested in the stress management skill in this module. I use all of the points given in the skill with the exception of deep relaxation. I can understand where the deep relaxation is beneficial. Life is chaotic! Work is chaotic! I'm going to take the time when away from work and try the deep relaxation to free up stress. The topic of positive mental attitude was also interesting. I think that having a good attitude about a certain uneasy situation can help us have a positive outcome.

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    Sergeant Michael Prachel

    This module on Self-Management caught my attention right away and I found myself relating to many of these skills. One of the skills that I believe is obviously important is “Centering.” We in law enforcement need to hit the “reset button” from time-to-time and balance out our work and personal lives. The example he provided with officer’s having a pulse rate of 68 beats per minute on their days off, climbing to 100 beats per minute when they arrive to work, is very concerning. Staying centered, promoting health and wellness, and reducing stress are ways for us to stay connected and become more effective at work and at home.