Command and Staff Program

ACE Track

Practical Emotional Intelligence

Replies
267
Voices
134
Dr. Mitch Javidi
Instructions:  
  1. Post a new discussion related to the topics covered in this module.  Your post needs to provide specific lessons learned with examples from this module helping you enhance your leadership capacity at work.
  2. After posting your discussion, review posts provided by other students in the class and reply to at least one of them. 
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    Nancy Franklin

    This module discussed some interesting topics regarding Emotional Intelligence and its uses for law enforcement. It is true that the citizens we serve expect law enforcement officers to exercise high levels of emotional intelligence. Citizens should expect officers to handle their emotions and their responses to things that trigger strong emotions, as this is a critical element needed when responding to high stress and often dangerous calls for service. The police are often the first resource called when someone is experiencing crisis. If officers do not possess emotional intelligence and exercise control over their responses to these emotions, they will only add to the chaos and will be unlikely to effectively deescalate a situation. The eight different uses of emotional intelligence covered in this lecture provide some insight to the effectiveness of emotional intelligence, as well as a road map that can be used to develop these skills in officers. I believe that emotional intelligence can be taught, as suggested in this learning module. Officers can be trained using practical scenarios and classroom work aimed at providing tools for personal development targeting topics such as: self-reflection and self-assessment, active listening and empathy skills, effective communication strategies, critical thinking skills, and problem-solving. We already train in many of these areas, but the training focus is generally on police tactics where officers are trained to protect themselves by focusing on inherent dangers. This training is critically important for officer survival, especially in today's social environment. However, we must not ignore the need to train our officers on the importance of not just police tactics, but also on employing our emotional intelligence to deescalate and resolve issues before they rise to the level of police use of force.

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    Kyle Turner

    The topic of emotional intelligence at my agency has never been directly discussed. Using the definition in the lesson that it is the ability to identify, assess, and control the emotions of oneself, others and groups, it seems obvious that as LEO's we have been doing this for years and learning, usually informally and on the job, how to do this. 10 years ago it was taught in part as "verbal judo." But formal training in all aspects of EQ has never been provided. As a supervisor and a manager, the employees that receive the most complaints or get into the most fights generally do so, I see now in hindsight, because of a lack of EQ. I can see training in this as a benefit, but difficult to quantify and therefore justify the time and expense for agencies.

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      Nancy Franklin

      I think you are correct in that we as law enforcement officers have been utilizing our emotional intelligence for years and learning to hone those skills in our daily interactions. I would argue that we do not necessarily have to justify time/expense for training, but rather understand how to better utilize and assess the EQ skills in our current training regiments. When we train our officers using scenario-based training our instructors/evaluates can assess an officer's level of EQ by the manner in which they perform.
      Deficiencies in EQ can then be addressed through further instruction and exposure to training scenarios that will allow officers to develop their EQ skills.

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    Chris Corbin

    My biggest takeaway from this module is that I need to slow down and be more deliberate and empathetic when giving assignments to my subordinates. After considering how I typically do this, I now see that I tend to be too task-oriented when giving an assignment, and not sufficiently focused on ensuring that my staff gain a clear understanding of what the path to success looks like, what challenges may present themselves, and what tools and skills will be required to ensure success. By focusing more on their perspective and working to give them the information and support that I would want when being assigned a task, I am confident that I can help my subordinates achieve greater success, and bring greater efficiency to the management of our projects.

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      Jason Porter

      I agree with what you have said. I to tend to be task oriented when assigning tasks to be completed. I tend to think how quickly I can get the task done, not taking in to consideration that the one I have assigned it to is still learning and trying to accomplish the same task with possibly less experience. Taking the time to inform, teach and show them the proper way and why it needs to be done a certain way I still need work on.

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      Christopher Savoie

      I agree with you. Sometimes we get more involved in getting the job done, and need to slow down and make sure we are communicating to our subordinates. We need to take the time to listen to them and observe their nonverbal expressions. I think that supporting the process of how they want to accomplish the task is just as important as the task being completed.

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    Jarod Primicerio

    After completing the lectures in this module, I thought back upon my career thus far, and the many of personnel I've worked with. While one would assume there is an initial course assisting law enforcement officers get to an acceptable level of emotional intelligence (EI), including an annual booster class, it is surprising there is not. I have worked with many police officers who cannot control their emotions and often had to overcome disciplinary issues after negative interactions both with the public and supervisors. The seven steps identified to improve EI for police officers seems to be a quick and possibly effective solution to fill this void. Specifically, officers NEED to know what their "hot buttons" are and identify ways to navigate through them. Sharing these with peers and possibly a supervisor though, requires humility and a desire for change.

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      Chris Corbin

      I agree with your assessment that it is surprising that there are not many formal training opportunities for law enforcement officers on emotional intelligence. To contend with the absence of such training, our Department recently introduced a 2-hour 'Emotional Intelligence' course within its required Advanced Quarterly Trainings (AQTs). Since the introduction of this course, I have found that some of the basic concepts of EI are now occasionally being referenced in our briefing trainings and even in discussions regarding our policies and procedures. Even though our understanding of EI is basic, I have already seen its benefits, albeit on a limited scale, and I believe we are all beginning to see its potential.

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        Jarod Primicerio

        Corbin - what a great idea. The AQT is definitely something lacking in our Agency. EI specifically, isn't even mentioned in our mandatory or optional trainings. It would be great to see what your EI course looks like and see if it would be a good addition to our courses.

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        Brian Lewis

        I also agree having EI as part of AQT is a great idea. Is the 2-hour course something your department created, or did you go with an outside provider?

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      Drauzin Kinler

      It is unfortunate that this type of training is not mandated annually in order to keep our law enforcement accreditation. I know that many agencies face the challenges of not having the funding available to provide this sort of training to every police officer. I think it would be beneficial to everyone involved.

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        You are correct. Before this, the closest thing out there was Verbal Judo. It was effective is helping you maintain control but it did not do much to stave off anger or frustration. More departments should mandate these types of courses since it seems our words seem to be getting police in more trouble than physical force.

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        Ryan Manguson

        I agree. Training on EI is slowly making its way into all levels of law enforcement but it has been a slow roll. I have to admit that I hadn't heard of EI before it was introduced in and adult learning session of our Police Training Officer program. EI needs to be required training to be P.O.S.T eligible. As Goleman said in the module, EI can be learned. So it should be a standard park of LE training.

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          Sergeant Chad Blanchette

          I agree with you Ryan, but think I think we should take an additional step and have this integrated into our public school systems. If you look at a lot of the issues that we deal with on a daily basis, I could make the argument that the majority can be tied back to EI. ie: Social Skills, Impulse Control, Managing Emotions. Kids are not being taught these life skills at home.

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      I couldn't agree more that officers out of all people need to be able to control their emotions. I have also seen many be disciplined for their actions because they were unable to control their emotions. Unfortunately officers are frequently put in situations that are going to test them and not being able to keep themselves in check during times of high stress is going to cause a lot of negative reactions and most likely poor decision making. Everyone has their "hot buttons". Some seem to have more than others, but those are the individuals that need to work harder towards being able to control their emotions. Training for this is often put by the wayside in our department it seems like, but it is something that is very important to remember and that should be brought to the front to be completed and to regularly be done.

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    Brian Lewis

    This is the first I've heard of Emotional Intelligence and found the topic very interesting. I've found not having self-awareness of my emotions as a young officer and even as a newly appointed administrator has given others the wrong perception of me. My passion for certain issues was sometimes perceived as anger and I can see why now. I have a tendency to wear my emotions on my sleeve and react before clearly thinking about the other view point. I feel this is an area I need to grow more as a leader and this module has definitely given me the tools to better managing my emotions.

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      Colby Stewart

      This is the first i have heard of Emotional Intelligence as well. After i completed this lecture i asked one of my coworkers how my delivery was perceived by other staff members and i was informed that when i was upset staff would tell each other not to approach me until i have calmed down. I'am now going to work my self awareness as well.

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      ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

      I had the same issues early on in my career. I started applying this method without really knowing what it was until now. It is quite a difference.

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      Sergeant Michael Prachel

      Like you Brian, this was the first I have heard of Emotional Intelligence, especially when related to Law Enforcement. This lecture brought to my attention many areas where I know I can improve, both professionally and personally. Being self-aware of certain “hot buttons” or triggers ahead of time can be beneficial. Always knowing your emotional status and how to control these emotional triggers will not only make you a more professional law enforcement officer, but a leader others will look up to. Looking back on many incidents, especially in my early years in law enforcement, I see now how important this concept is. I am certain with self-regulation and clear thinking before acting, incidents that escalate may not always have to.

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    Henry Dominguez

    This was a very interesting lecture and one that really brought some realities to me and my department. I think having an Emotional Intelligence course, or at least some sort of training would be a great idea. In fact, from what I can remember, the only EI that I was ever taught was at the academy during pursuit driving training. I vividly remember the instructor talking about tunnel vision and to make sure you open up your eyes to your surroundings. We often times go to advanced officer training to be a FTO, ride a motor, investigations; however, we never train our emotions even though they are the one thing that are completely in our control. I often talk to my officers about having a "knee jerk" reaction and to not just react based on emotions and feelings. Maybe implementing a course like the ones stated above would help our department with this issue. Especially since our new officers that we hire seem to have less (or different) life experiences then before.

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      Ray Bonillas

      Henry,

      I agree with your post as it pertains to implementing or providing an Emotional Intelligence course for our personnel. Most of our training is cognitive based and rightfully so, but we need to work on emotional intelligence because it this career our emotions and the emotions of other are what cause problems to escalate. As the lecture stated, 80 to 85 percent of complaints against officers were based on how the officer made a person feel. If we could teach each our personnel to recognize and control their triggers, we maybe able to reduce our complaints significantly and possibly reduce our use of force.

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    Ray Bonillas

    This lecture was very informative. I find that building upon our ability to identify , access and control our emotions and the emotions of others to be an effective tool as a leader within an organization and the community. If I could have utilized the ten second rule much more in discussions in the past. I coud have walked away feeling much better about the incident and myself. This lecture will help me become a better person as I learn to become self-aware of my emotions and managed them to achieve effective communication with my personnel and the public. I also recognize it is just as importance to socially be aware of the emotions of others and to successfully provide resolution while controlling those emotions. Improving our emotional intelligence ability will allow us to recognize our "Hot Buttons" and learn to control them. Great Lecture!

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      Magda Fernandez

      I agree with you, There are many times i made emotionally charged decisions that i later regretted. I guess i have never recognized what my true triggers were, so i never recognized them when they happened . I also agree that decisions made when we are emotionally charged can be very draining both mentally and physically. Although my department provides training on emotional intelligence, i don't think i have ever broken it down to this level. Learning how to recognize my triggers, waiting before i say something or do something is something i definitely have to do.

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    Magda Fernandez

    In listening to the lecture I was happy to see my department has been proactive in providing training related to emotional intelligence to our officers and discussed topics that were covered in this chapter. However, the training is good and all, but if we are not disciplined to practice and employ what we learn, then what good Is the training? It made me realize that this cannot be a one or two times training evolution and check a box off. We as supervisors must remain engaged with our officers and have an understanding of where they are coming from. Our peer support program has significantly helped officers in dealing with their emotions. I believe officers need to see, know and feel the command is engaged and genuinely cares about them.
    With that it also made me realize I need to be more aware of my triggers and how I deal with them and how I project my and convey my messages to my peers and my subordinates.

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      Frank Acuna

      Magda,

      I enjoyed your post and reading that your department's peer support program is helping your officers deal with their emotions. This idea of dealing with your emotions is somewhat foreign in the field of law enforcement. Anyone with a significant amount of time on the job, was more than likely trained to "just deal" with the variety of emotions experienced from highly traumatic situations such as deaths, shootings, stabbings or being physically attacked. I believe as supervisor's we must encourage our personnel to understand that it is okay to be affected by these situations and help them deal with them so they can have a long and prosperous career.

      Frank

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      Monte Potier

      I am glad to see your department has been proactive in providing this training. With all of the POST requirements and other training departments overlook this important training. I agree of the importance of this training and hope my department takes the suggestion from me.

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        David Cupit

        I agree with the lack of training in the psychological area.I think most departments mainly focus on enforcement and not on preparing officer how to handle the mental aspects of the job.

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    Colby Stewart

    This lecture for very informative to me what have learned from this lecture is the importance is making decisions by using reason and not personal feeling and not making decisions out of anger. I agree that sometimes we need to take a breath think about our decisions on how the other person an employee or citizen of the community is going to perceive our decision. I have learned that when we make a delivery on a decision we have made we need to sometimes hide our personal feelings (facial expressions). If i sound sincere when listing to some one about a issue they are having but i'am not engage in their conversation and i roll my eyes or look around the room and im not making eye contact they can tell or perceive that i'am not listing to their problem or i don't really care.

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      Thomas Martin

      You are spot on Colby. If the situation allows us time to think before acting, I believe we must. We can most likely avoid a lot of heartache, grief, and a never ending report which will follow. I learned early on to treat everyone with respect, actually the same as you would want to be treated. But if the person does not allow you the opportunity (and you are forced to perform a forceful action) do it quickly and be done with it. I also agree that non-verbal body language is important. The public sees it just as much as we see theirs. Whatever their problem or complaint is, we have a duty to serve them. This should always be done in a professional way.

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    Frank Acuna

    This module discussed the idea of Emotional Intelligence (EI) and understanding how its application in law enforcement and as a leader. Emotional Intelligence is the idea that you can understand and control your emotions, as well as interpret the emotions, and emotional responses of others. In law enforcement, we are all trained to pick up on body language cues, its what helps keep us safe. When we contact someone in the field and although they are verbally compliant, our training and experience help us detect whether they are about to run, fight, or are being dishonest. The same is true as we discuss the implications of being a leader with a good understanding of EI or a high Emotional Quotient (EQ). As a leader, you must understand the emotions of your personnel, even when giving direction that is unfavorable to them. Despite our need to manage in our own name, we must also understand or be empathetic to their response. I would even expect a leader with high EQ to anticipate the response and prepare some support or be prepared to respond to negative reactions.

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    Brian Johnson

    I agree with all the comments made by the group. I personally have struggled with not having control over the triggers that create a negative response to conflict. The ability to apply the 10-second rule has been something that I've been training myself through an APP called Positive Intelligence. The daily focus (PQ) reps allow you to train your brain to have a positive (Sage) outcome. Remember, this will be a life-long process to develop your Sage brain and showing your EI brain is in control.

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    Brian Johnson

    If you would like to develop your EQ, I would encourage you to purchase Emotional Intelligence 2.0 by Travis Bradberry and Jean Greaves. It's a quick and easy read. The outline EQ in the following way: Personal Competence: Self-Awareness and Self-Management. Social Competence: Social Awareness and Relationship Management. With the purchase of the book, you get a free EI Appraisal, which is very informative and will help with your self-assessment.

    If we all believe that we should be life-long learners of leadership, then I would submit that the daily development of your EQ is not negotiable.

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    Monte Potier

    The part of this section that hit home was the review of the 4 branches of emotional Intelligence, especially managing emotions. Sometimes I immediately get upset when I feel that a subordinate did not complete an assignment. I need to better realize that even though they did not complete the assignment how I expected it may be due to me not being clear on my directions. This emotion could cause the employee to shut down or lose respect for me.

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    Jason Porter

    This module discussion about emotional intelligence hits home with what I try to accomplish with the people that work with and for me. Listening to their day to day talk about their family life or work life gives me a better understanding of who they are. With that knowledge I am able to assess the way they are on a daily basis. If someone is having a bad day it allows me to acknowledge that much more quickly.

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    Drauzin Kinler

    I have previously attended leadership training that included the subject of Emotional Intelligence. Prior to this training I was not aware that such a thing existed. I have noted from the training that I like many other police officer's need to improve in the area of empathy.
    I found that the interview in the lecture was very informative. I agree with the statement made in the interview where according to Goldman, D. (2020), "You can't make someone be empathetic. They have to want to be more empathetic. Empathy is crucial".
    This is one area that I have focused my attention and plan on working hard to improve upon.

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    Mike Brown

    Emotional intelligence although has been around for sometime, is not being taught to young officers graduating from the police academy.I do believe that emotional intelligence is needed in our profession. I would have to alleviate some of the issue that plague young law enforcement officers. Understanding what will trigger an unwanted response and how to handle the emotions will make us better individuals.

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      Dan Wolff

      Brown,

      Although an actual block of Emotional Intelligence is not taught in the academy I believe other facets of training in assisting them to be more self-aware. I do agree with you that maybe there should be something specific taught so young cadets can place an emotional reaction to part of their training and understand it better. Maybe by this, it will help them be more self-aware of their own emotions when reacting to a situation presented to them

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        Royce Starring

        I agree. There are so many things that is covered in the E.I. Module that would have made my career easier and me a better officer.

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      Amanda Pertuis

      I graduated from an academy in May 2019 and we were taught several aspects of emotional intelligence. I would suggest it as an in-service so new and old officers can benefit.

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      Justin Payer

      I agree this should be taught in the academy. I'm sure we have all seen a situation deteriorate because an officer arrived on scene who did not practice emotional intelligence. Many times we can keep situations calm just by keeping our emotions in check.

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    Dan Wolff

    What I take from this module is several important things that we do on a daily basis, and sometimes, we don’t even think about it. For example, out of the 4 branches, the first is perceived emotions. When you get to work what clues do your followers give you on how they are doing? On patrol a certain tone in their voice on the radio could be one non-verbal signal that they are having a bad day. Or, if you are talking to them in person on a situation they may have, usually reading their body language dictates on how you will react. What is your self-awareness on your reaction to their situation? When dealing with followers or even the public, try to be aware of your reactions, facial expressions, and body language. If you give the wrong non-verbal it could send the wrong message

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      Joey Prevost

      I'm sure we have all been on that call where all is going well, only to have one officer's body language have the entire crowd turn against you. Self awareness is our first step to success on this topic

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        Jarvis Mayfield

        I think self regulation is also a great tool. Because if an officer can regulate himself and conduct himself in a professional manner the crowd may stay under control and on his side.

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      Samantha Reps

      I agree with the watching your non-verbal cues. I don't know how many times that my staff had made comments to me about "looking angry" or not being in a good mood, when in fact, there is nothing wrong with me. This was a self reflection on managing my own body language and paying attention to others.

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    Joey Prevost

    It is only in recent training I have attended that I first heard the term Emotional Intelligence and it made me realize a lot about myself and others around me. If we wish to be successful in anything, we must learn how to navigate both ourselves and other people. I believe that mental preparation and training is key, just as we train our muscle memory. We must mentally imagine scenarios and how best we should deal with them. This certainly applies to our personal lives and our professional relationships with our co-workers.

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      Judith Estorge

      I agree with role playing scenarios. I do this often while working ODS to help me prepare for possible scenarios. I liked the last slide in this module about "train your brain to draw your weapon exactly the same way. By conscious thought and repetition". These are effective suggestions.

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    Chasity Arwood

    Learning to read nonverbal cues from others is very important when dealing with the public, as well as, those we supervise. When dealing with the public, recognizing nonverbal cues can help in de-escalating situations. We also have to be aware of the nonverbal cues we give off as supervisors. We can be saying one thing verbally but our facial expressions could indicate something opposite.

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      Lance Leblanc

      I agree that nonverbal cues are important. Upon viewing theses clues especially in an interview sometime you can tell if the suspect is being truthful. Paying attention to non verbal cues often will tell if a suspect is about to resist arrest.

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      Laurie Mecum

      Non verbal cues are also really important when interviewing people for employment as well. No eye contact, fidgety or things like that. It could mean that someone is nervous or maybe that they are timid when may not be a quality you are looking for in your candidate.

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    Judith Estorge

    I liked this module as it is an area of improvement I work on daily. Watching as a person speaks to interpret their verbal cues is a challenge. It also requires intense listening. As with most people, I have the habit of thinking what I want to say while the other person is speaking. This E. I. module is a good reminder of the benefits of knowing myself better and learning more about others.

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    Lance Leblanc

    This is the first time I have heard of Emotional Intelligence. I think as law enforcement officers most of us subconsciously do theses things. I am type A personality and often too aggressive where I shouldn't be. Though ,I think my Self-awareness and emotional management has improved recently. The four branches of Emotional Intelligence simplified the topic.

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    David Cupit

    This is a great subject in this lecture and when put into use, will help our every day interactions with the public. The better i get to know myself the better I will be in my job as a leader.

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    Royce Starring

    I have learned that I have been using emotional intelligence everyday. When I have been on calls and have looked at the suspect body language or facial expression to determine if the suspect was truthful. Even at a restaurant when dealing with a server. I have used this in determining if someone's personality was compatible with mine. In the one lecture the instructor states how he made a determination about the restaurant because of the one waiter, this is true in law enforcement. The way one officer treats a citizen can determine that persons views of the department their entire life.

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      Jarvis Mayfield

      I agree. When dealing with others, we should used a great level of empathy and self awareness. When someone see that you care it will change their body language, mindset and facial expressions of the department.

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    Christopher Savoie

    This module has taught me the importance of Emotional Intelligence in leadership. Having never learned about this topic in the past,I found it very interesting. I have seen it used in the past to deescalate a situation at a scene, but what I found most useful was its use as a leader. I have used this technique in managing people, having learned it from my leaders from in the past. I have always found that one of the most useful tools was empathy, if you can put yourself in the shoes of the employee or complainant, and see it from their perspective, you will be able to help that person come to a satisfactory resolution to their problem.

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      David Ehrmann

      I completely agree. I think as leaders we knew what emotional intelligence was but never formally learned about it. I also think that empathy is one of the most useful tools. Every agency has that officer to where when they come to a "hot" scene, we know they are about to escalate the situation rather than being empathetic to the complainant's situation.

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    Samuel Lucia

    The reality is that law enforcement is a service industry. We are here to serve the customer, and learning, then applying emotional intelligence in all that we do is what the customer expects. Often, it seems we forget this, which creates dissatisfaction, complaints and hatred for the most noble profession.

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      Nicole Oakes

      Lucia that is really well put and I couldn't agree more. We as officers often forget just that thing, we are civil servants. A lot of our officers are not self aware and are not utilizing self-control and empathy in situations that are high stress. So definite dissatisfaction when it could have all been done so differently.

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    Jarvis Mayfield

    To be a good leader one should be able to direct and motivate. A leader should also be able to influence people by providing a purpose. In the five keys circle of emotional intelligence a leader should also possess Motivation, Empathy, Social skills, Self regulation and Self Awareness so that he can be well rounded. Out of the five keys I really believe that a leader should stress empathy due to the new age employees not being able to deal with some of the day to day events.

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      Clint Patterson

      Jarvis I strongly agree with your last sentence. The Millennials or Generation Y definitely require law enforcement officers to be more empathetic. Though officers possess the ability to understand and share the feelings of another person, this generation makes it a bit more challenging.

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    David Ehrmann

    I never really thought how much emotional intelligence is needed in law enforcement until now. As law enforcement professionals, we not only deal with employees, co-workers and bosses, but also deal with the public. It is imperative that a law enforcement officer is in tune with the emotional intelligence to better handle a situation; whether it be a citizen complaint being handled or when dealing with an employee. The officer who has a good understanding of their emotional intelligence can turn a highly agitated situation into a clam and manageable situation in the matter of moments. As law enforcement professionals, we need to do better at teaching officers about what emotional intelligence. If we do this, it will greatly improve the public’s trust and respect for law enforcement. Also, as leaders, knowing about our emotional intelligence will allow us to be better at leading our employees. If we are in tune to their needs and can empathize with what maybe going on in their personal or professional life, we can foster better working relationships between leaders and employees.

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      dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

      David, I completely agree with you more. I can't tell you the number of emails I have replied to in anger and would have sent before ICLD. I now stop before sending the emails, print them, read them again, and usually end up putting the printed copy in my desk as a reminder and rewriting my response with a cooler head.

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    Clint Patterson

    I found Daniel Goleman's interview on Working with Emotional Intelligence to be very interesting. Mr. Goleman mentioned the "Peter Principle," which we have all probably seen while working for law enforcement agencies. We have all had that one person who is politically connected, possilby giving things on a silver platter or commonly referred to as the "brown noser". However, at some point, that person rises to the level of incompetence. This is a prime example of a person who fits well in a division within an agency but is promoted or moved to another level of leadership where they are no longer competent. This person may have excelled in their previous roles but now cause a headache to their subordinates because of the "Peter Principle."

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    Laurie Mecum

    Many law enforcement officers do not often associate with Emotional Intelligence. For many years, you were considered weak if you showed any emotion. It was considered a “macho” profession. Times have changed, agencies have evolved to where we need to bring Emotional Intelligence training into our agencies more and talk about it. As stated throughout this module, people need to be aware of their own feeling, be able to see how other people are feeling just by looking at their body language and being able to remain calm in stressful situations. Our officers are on the front line and their behavior is a direct reflection on the entire agency.

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      Lance Landry

      Laurie I could not agree more with your statement. Law enforcement is still considered a “macho” profession and some are considered weak if they show emotion. To add to that law enforcement officers are human beings that have all the same emotions as the very people they deal with. If most could learn to treat people how they want to be treated or their family to be treated by law enforcement what a better environment it would become. So the need to change that perspective will have to come from education about emotional intelligence.

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    Nicole Oakes

    I believe that Law Enforcement as a whole has progressed in the last decade to the point where we are more aware of the importance of Emotional Intelligence. I believe that as time goes on, as stated throughout this presentation, officers mature by learning to manage their feelings, anger and anxiety along with gaining self confidence. I know that at our Agency we promote verbal judo and active listening skills. I believe that we should now focus more on self awareness and control with all of our officers, especially our young officers, to help them be better officers and future leaders.

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      mmcnab@spokanepolice.org

      I completely agree Nicole. What we used to label as maturity and experience are really components of Emotional Intelligence. I remember in the academy (very long time ago) seasoned officers would explain that as they became more experienced they spent more time talking with people and less time exerting their authority which often leads to uses of force or complaints.

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    Roanne Sampson

    I did not realize the concept of emotional intelligence was introduced in the 1930's by Edward Thorndike. I thought it was a rarely new idea. Since then this topic has been explored by many individuals and I find the work of Daniel Goleman to be intriguing. He thoroughly explained emotional intelligence is "how we handle ourselves." A person who has emotional intelligence does not display negative emotions. I also learned about the five circles of emotional intelligence as well. In order to have emotional intelligence one must know who they are, be able to channel their emotions positively, be able to achieve their objectives and know how to work out disagreements. Also, empathy is very important. Officers must work on their response in different situations, especially in the public. Body language also plays a factor in emotional intelligence. How would you handle a person exhibiting a negative attitude through their body language?

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      Christian Johnson

      I was surprised by how long ago this concept was first brought up as well, Roanne. And I agree, the interview with Goleman was fantastic.

      As far as someone under your command exhibiting negative body language, deal with it right away. I have found they don't even realize they are doing it. Once you bring it to their attention though, they begin to see it and dislike doing it. Change then takes care of itself.

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    Christian Johnson

    I really enjoyed this module and it resonated with me personally quite a bit. Early in my career I took everything negative someone said to me as a personal attack. Sometimes it was, but most often it was not. That didn’t matter though. I tended to let my mouth run wild. No, that did not serve me well in any fashion. It got me verbally scolded by my supervisor regularly. Eventually I took a step back, did some self-analysis of why I reacted that way too often and made a conscious decision to change. My career then began to move forward. That was not a coincidence!

    It is our job as supervisors to assist our personnel in avoiding that pitfall. I have used my personal story on numerous occasions when helping someone having the same issue. Because it is personal for me, it has worked well and I have been able to help others get out of that habit much more quickly than I did.

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      Rocco Dominic, III

      I too was a negative person in the early years. I would constantly argue with my Lieutenant. One day my sergeant pulled me aside to talk. She explained that I was a good deputy but way to negative and vocal. She also stated, I would never get promoted if I continued acting like this. After that conversation, I took a step back and realized she was right. After taking control of my Emotional Intelligence and transferring to another position, I was promoted to Lieutenant.

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      dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

      Correct and it wasn't until you yourself decided that it was time for a change. No matter how much you were spoken to it didn't matter it is something that you have to decide to make that change.

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    Amanda Pertuis

    I always enjoy learning more about Emotional Intelligence. It is something we often talk to our personnel about because you never know what you will have to deal with over the phone. Our personnel often get the callers who are emotionally hijacked and have to attempt to calm them down to get information for responding officers. The way we respond to them is the difference between them cooperating to give us information or them becoming more uncooperative and providing no information. I will take the tools provided and share with my personnel.

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      Corinn Pickett

      I recently heard someone speak about handling emotional situations. You can manage a crisis or you can become a part of it. Emotional intelligence is about learning to observe emotions and manage them.

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        Kudos to this, being able to rapidly assess a situation is a learned skill in the LEO world. Handling calls and dealing with "real world" situations grants the ability for officers to use their experiences to "stop" a situation that otherwise may grow from an unnecessary situation. Being able to "diagnose" a situation can literally "save lives" during certain incidents we encounter. The old saying " An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" is appropriate for this board I believe.

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    Rocco Dominic, III

    During my early years, I was a negative person while working in Transportation. During those years I would constantly argue with my Lieutenant. It got to the point where I would quote policy and procedure just to prove him wrong during arguments, doing so in front of other deputies. Then one day my sergeant pulled me to the side to talk. During that conversation, she stated, I was a good deputy but need to quit being so negative and to stop arguing the lieutenant in front of others, whether I was correct or not, be tactful, she stated.
    After that conversation I changed my ways. I practiced Self-Regulation, not knowing it of course. Taking control of my emotions and getting assigned to another division help me advance in my career. I am now a Lieutenant who supervises a shift of about fourteen deputies with fourteen different Emotional Intelligence levels.

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    mmcnab@spokanepolice.org

    My department began introducing this topic some time ago and amongst many other communication trainings that were focused on officers having the tools to de-escalate situations. To look at this through the lens of leadership, I can see instances where the leaders in my agency have room to improve, myself included.

    My biggest take-away from this lesson is the recommendations at the conclusion; being self-aware, being in-control, 10 second rule, and conscious thought and repetition in practicing these methods. I can attest that poor decisions made by me and leadership I have observed over the years has been mostly attribute to decisions made based on emotions and where more time and consideration should have been taken before action.

    I believe that adding time to critical decisions is a key element for all types of decisions. Time is relative to the timeline dictated by the problem we are faced with. For example an executive decision about the direction of the agency can be contemplated for days, weeks or months, as opposed to a use of force decision that can only be given seconds, minutes or hours. Adding time, contemplation and collaboration can only help us make better decisions in either of these circumstances.

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      Lieutenant John Champagne

      I agree with the ten-second rule as I wish I would have used it in the past. I also feel that while selecting Officers for the Field Training Officer program, this is an excellent opportunity to choose Officers with a more significant amount of EQ, as they will be the officers rookie policeman look towards for guidance. We can use this to build EQ in our newer employees. By placing the salty old officer that hates the world into the FTO program, that negativity will rub off on the rookie and have consequences down the line.

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          Mr. Collins I totally agree with you. If this course can be implemented into academies; it will definitely help push out a better quality officer. So many of these millennials have the entitled mindset. They feel that the world owe them something and they have no respect for authority. This would expose them to positive reinforcement. They need to be taught how to evaluate their feelings and control their emotions.

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    Corinn Pickett

    Emotional intelligence is something that much like a leader can be ingrained or born with as well as learned over time. Emotional intelligence is something that we continuously learn and can also be thought of as maturity. As we grow older we mature with emotional intelligence. Those who have higher emotional intelligence do well as leaders and managers because in most cases employees care more about how you make them feel that what you know. As long as you can find the right answers it is more about being able to emotionally connect with people.

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      Donnie

      I agree with this. Just like everyone is born with a moral compass, you also have an internal understanding of different emotions. How they are controlled and utilized is where this lecture helps. Learn to develop an emotional intelligence strategy in yourself and you may produce or influence other productive thoughtful leaders.

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    Donnie

    I understand Emotional Intelligence as a tool to first study yourself and secondly study others around you to identify the general mood of a situation or the environment you are currently operating. Body language is one of the biggest indicators. Law enforcement has been doing this for a while; it was just never explained or detailed in this manner. Nor do I believe it was specifically targeted as another tool to put in our “experience toolbox”. Look at most agency Use of Force guidelines. Officer presence is usually listed first and I was always taught that if you’re calm then you are likely to make the situation calm. And if not, here’s (insert drama here) what can happen. The lecture certainly makes it more understandable and breaks emotional intelligence down to a teachable and useful tool. Identifying your own EI characteristics first may help you to identify others when things are going south or you need to be put in check yourself.

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      michael-beck@lpso.net

      Donnie,
      I definitely agree that this is another useful tool for the tool box. I also think it'll behoove us to use that tool more often with our officers so that this is not just something they have to learn, or re-learn, but something which will carry on for years to come.

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    Lance Landry

    Emotional intelligence was a term that I had never heard before this lecture. However, thinking back during my lifetime I understand now how I developed from a young man, prior to ever working in public service, to who I am now. As a young teenager I was very quick to anger when things did not go my way. Then I got married and eventually became a parent. Most of us know children change your perspective on a lot of things so I quickly learned patience.

    My public service career began in the medical field. There we were trained to recognize signs and symptoms and more importantly human physiology. Those skills were polished to where I could read someone’s face to determine how much pain they were in or the pattern of their breathing to determine if they were in distress. You most certainly had to be empathetic as well as develop good communication skills to speak with patients or other medical staff. I worked alone so a patient’s life depended solely on me so I learned to operate in a highly stressful situation. So unbeknownst to me I was developing emotional intelligence early on.

    Fast forward to the beginning of my law enforcement career where I carried those tools I learned in the medical field with me. On the street learning criminal body language skills came easier, speaking with complainants came easier, excelling in the high stress situations came easier, and managing my own emotions came easier. These skills all served me well while I worked in enforcement. The trick now is to learn how to use these skills as an administrator more effectively.

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      Many of these skills we possess, we just have not put a million dollar name on them. I believe your ability to recognize and identify your use of these skills in the pass will make the transition to administrator easier. The Empathy and ability to recognize how others are felling gives you the ability to make good judgement decisions.

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        jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

        I agree that there are many of these skills that each of us possess, probably without even knowing that we do or putting a fancy name on them. For me putting a name on them, helps me recognize the qualities and hopefully make me more aware of them. Kinda like self awareness in a way, being able to identify if I need improvement on one of the key concepts of EI. For example just being more self aware of my own moods, emotions and feelings will help me better deal with a problem and possibly help me make better judgement calls.

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    Lieutenant John Champagne

    Practical Emotional Intelligence
    I had a little knowledge of Emotional Intelligence before this lecture. This lecture opened my eyes to all the different aspects that go into emotional intelligence. I can look into our Agency and observe the different levels of EQ. I found that as I grew in my career, I also increased my EQ. Although I still have lots of room for growth, I can see a difference. The seven steps to improving Emotional Intelligence in Law Enforcement is the one section I took the most away. I have found myself responding to supervisors or colleagues, strictly on emotions. I should have taken the time to gather my thoughts and examine my feelings before my response. After listening to this lecture, this will be the case moving forward.

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      mtroscla@tulane.edu

      I agree, emotional intelligence is certainly a quality that involves maturation, not only career wise, but as a person. At a command level it could mean a difference in unit effectiveness, but at an officer level emotional intelligence and response to trauma or antagonization could mean the difference in a productive ending, to a complaint, or worse yet an indictment.

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    McKinney

    I had a colleague that returned from the FBI National Academy, and we discussed his studies, and he mentioned Emotional Intelligence, which was the first time that I heard of this. I tried to put the information we discussed into perspective but was limited. This module provided growth and enabled me to have a new insight into myself and how I interrupt others. Daniel Goleman’s interview, along with the other information presented, allowed me to understand my mindset through self-awareness and to understand my emotional intelligence in addressing problems. Can I move forward when an obstacle has presented itself? Am I empathic towards others? These are a few things out of the many that have to be considered and recognize within.

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    I have seen different courses and books with Emotional Intelligence (EI) as their core principle. I believe there is an unquestioned place for this concept in evaluating and promoting leaders in an agency. The concept of EI to maturity makes a lot of common sense. As people gain experience they are better able to judge situations and make better decisions. The self realization of ones own emotions are very important.

    One of the most important principles brought to my attention in my Crisis Negotiator role was the inverse relationship between Logic and Emotions. I make sure to share with my cadets and fellow law enforcement professionals that realizing this concept and being aware of the emotional state of others is very important. When one is dealing with someone who is in an emotionally charged state, that person's ability to think logically can be severely compromised. Many people struggle with self regulation. This can take various forms such as crumbling under stress or with anxiety to anger or even misplaced blame when faced with grief or anger.

    Being aware of the 5 principles of EI will allow a person to better prepare and react to a situation as far as their own actions. It will also give them the insight to have Empathy when others don't understand the behavior of someone who has not achieved a level of EI where they have self awareness or self regulation.

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    ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

    I often acted out of anger and was very emotional early in my career. Several years ago, I evaluated my attitude and started using some of this philosophy without even knowing what it was. This has definitely explained some of my thoughts and carried it to a whole new level. I am excited to go further into this process and see what the results will be.

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      McKinney

      I agreed with your statement. We apply some of the techniques that were mentioned in the presentation without even knowing.

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        Burke

        I agree. Before I ever knew about emotional intelligence I was utilizing it when it comes to empathy towards my subordinates. Its is a great tool to have in your tool bag.

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    jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

    I particularly enjoyed this session on Emotional Intelligence and learning the key concepts and principles. I agree completely with the video explaining how companies, departments and the work force in general are moving more towards evaluating potential employees emotional intelligence rather then just IQ. Especially in the Law Enforcement career field it is extremely important to be self aware, self regulatory, have social skills, empathy and motivation. In my CID unit I have instituted a EI test for new applicants that put in for positions and have incorporated it into the evaluation process. One misconception I had before taking this training, was that EI was something that was just part of ones personality and really didn't change. After completing the training, it was interesting to learn that EI is something that can be learned. The person must want learn, want to be taught and be able to recognize what EI looks like in others.

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    Burke

    Emotional Intelligence is probably one of the hardest topics for a law enforcement officer to accomplish. While we spend hundreds of hours honing our skills on weapons, tactics, and the law we usually fail to study these topics.

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      anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

      I agree topics like this was briefly touched on in training because it wasn't deemed as a priority. But not having the knowledge of Emotional Intelligence is one of the reasons Law enforcement is scrutinized today.

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      Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

      While I believe we all agree that Emotional Intelligence is one of the hardest topics for LEO's and agencies to accomplish, I think we all agree after going through this lesson that it is a "skill" that we now know the importance of and can push to gather more information on and bring back to our respective agency to bring them and our peers to the next level.

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        dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

        I agree with you, Dustin. Many agencies tend to focus only on the fundamentals of shooting, defensive tactics, or law updates. While all those are necessary, we must also bring to the forefront the importance of emotional intelligence. Every agency has one or more officers who arrive on the scene and make it difficult when interacting with victims, witnesses, or suspects. Emotional intelligence training would be very beneficial to officers such as this.

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    anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

    This lecture on Emotional Intelligence has given me a better understanding of why it is important to manage my emotions, and how it can affect me and my followers when I don't. It also made me aware that having Emotional Literacy, can help me respond correctly to situations when they come up. As a commander, if one of my followers has done something that would push a hot button, using the four techniques I learn is this lecture will help me properly address the situation while keeping the respect of my followers.

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      cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

      I couldn't agree more. It is easy as a leader to not respond as we should when a "Hot Button" is pressed. Emotional Intelligence is defiantly a tool that not only every leader but every person should work on.

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    cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

    Emotional Intelligence is not a subject that is discussed in law enforcement on the level that this module did so. As officers we are always told that we should be respectful to the public that we deal with not matter the situation. This is usually the end of the training for dealing with the public and co-workers. As leaders this is excellent training that should be practiced and also handed down to the people that follow us.

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    michael-beck@lpso.net

    As I went through this lecture, I began to ask myself how emotionally intelligent I actually am. I feel that I am rather scholastically intelligent, but my emotions could use some work. I began to reflect back not only to when I was a young officer but to my childhood. The earliest life lesson I ever remember receiving was, “Suck it up! Boys don’t cry! Never let anyone see you’re upset.” This was in response to another boy taking an action figure. This advice was followed up by, “Now you had better get it back, beat him up if you have to, but don’t come home without it.” My mother was the person who told this to me.
    Then I began to think about being a new LEO. I believed I was rather good at putting myself in other people’s shoes, especially victims of domestic violence, as my household was not the most pleasant, and it gave me and excellent base for my early career. I did find myself lacking in the arena of empathy for most others and was often cold and harsh on other complaints, which lead to a lot of resisting charges. Through my career I feel I began to mellow, better learning how to manage people by at least fain interest, but by genuinely beginning to understand what issues some people were having.
    With all that said, as a new sergeant I was the one who was the “head-hunter” and earned a reputation that someone could easily catch a corrective review; a reputation which was wholly undeserved, but worked to keep subordinates in line. I did find that it left me with very few friends. I believe this was because I did not deal well with what I considered “petty” complaints from the deputies. I never put myself in their shoes and would instead tell them to, “Suck it up and deal with it,” the words of my mother – Ahh!
    After being promoted again, I found myself with the continued stigma of my previous position, one which is hard to break. I have and am trying hard to shake it, but old habits die hard. As Dr. Goleman stated that someone can grow and learn to be more emotionally intelligent, I feel as though I have grown and am less rigid than I used to be. I know I still have more room for growth and am working on it every day.

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    mtroscla@tulane.edu

    Unfortunately in law enforcement, emotional intelligence is not a personal quality that is well evaluated prior to hiring. Officers in the beginning of their careers, at least in this area are generally in an age range where they may not have had an opportunity to emotionally mature. Of course there are exceptions, but I believe that better emotional vetting and nurturing of existing employees would reduce complaints and produce a better product for our stakeholders.

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      Major Stacy Fortenberry

      Going hand in hand with your comment as I went thru this latest course I started to re evaluate how I scored people on the promotion boards. Going forward I will place more emphasis on their emotional IQ.

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    Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

    Like everyone, I too feel that emotional intelligence is a very important but also very consistently overlooked trait, which all people not just in a law enforcement but in everyday life could benefit from exploring and growing. The old saying that the first step is admitting you have a problem comes to mind, but how do you admit you lack emotional intelligence if it is something that you never evaluate? Throughout the power point i thought about myself personally and about how i could better react if i just started working on a few of the ways to use emotional intelligence. I believe we all could benefit from putting this lesson to use in everyday matters and not only enhance our professional lives but also better personal relationships while doing so.

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    Major Stacy Fortenberry

    We all have that one employee that just pisses everyone off. They are technically proficient but yet get way more complaints against them than all others. We always just said he cant talk to people. I will now take a different approach and think about that persons emotional intelligence and offer ways for him to become self aware and work on his emotional IQ.

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    This lesson is a key lesson to the times we are all living in right now. Every officer has different fears, especially right now of getting COVID-19 from a call for service, or community spread. I am watching officers struggle financially with loosing extra jobs that bring in extra forms of income.
    Knowing how to manage your emotional intelligence is important so we can stay strong as leaders. Knowing how to read you employees is even more vital then before so we can make sure they are safe and prepared for duty. I am watching employees stress over how they will survive, or issues such as who will watch our children while we are supposed to be at work.
    Learning empathy was a hard pill for me to shallow as a leader. I want to hold everyone accountable to the standards and work ethic I hold myself to. As a young leader, I was not very empathic to employees due to the fact if I am doing it so can you. I never took in account for family issues, or things going on in personal lives.
    Now that I am at the top of the food chain, Emotional Management and Intelligence is something that I have to stay abreast of, and keep in the forefront. I have read and participated in several book studies and lectures on emotional intelligence. Each book and lecture add different tools to my toolbox. But most importantly this has made me a stronger leader, who makes employee who want to work for you and follow you into battle.

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      wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

      During this hard time knowing how to manage your emotional intelligence is important. Some employees are staying at hotels of fearing bringing the virus home to their families, extra money they use to make has been terminated. So as a leader we have to stay strong and deal with this crisis one day at a time.

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      sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

      Scott

      Your post brought back memories of a younger version of me, another lifetime ago prior to Law Enforcement, i was a total work horse. Training ingrained in me by my Father. "The job had to get done no matter what", "leave your problems at home they cant touch you here" was the mantra constantly being fed to me. Now i find myself a leader in my Department, and that mindset will not get me far. Gaining empathy for others and their personal situations have put me in situations where now, people want to work for me or want to be transferred over to my shift. Amazing the change that occurs once you start learning E.I. and putting it into practice.

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    wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

    Emotional intelligence is one of the most vital components in the career as a public safety professional, as well as a tactical tool. As with any profession, one must be on top of things to get the job done. Experience changes in our lives 'like what we dealing with now cover-19' but when we walk on the job, the welfare and wellbeing of the citizens are our responsibility. As professionals, we must understand and recognize what drives and affects others emotions. Empathy is one of the toughest for a law Enforcement professional, for it involves considering the feelings of others when deciding and treating people in accordance to their emotional reactions.

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      steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

      I use to have this issue my self so I decided to imagine everyone I deal with as if they were myself or someone I loved and how I would want them to be treated. Great thoughts.

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        chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

        Steven I agree with you as well, I feel that we have to treat everyone as if they're a loved one. It puts us in a different mind frame because we know the people we encounter is someone's father, child or uncle. So we always try to handle everyone with fairness, which I know my social skills come into play because I know I can be a peoples person until I have to act accordingly depending the situation, but still in all I know I have to keep my emotions intact no matter of the situation.

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          Lt. Mark Lyons

          I agree. I take every opportunity I can to remind our staff to treat others the way they would want to be treated. I'm not asking that they be submissive, I just ask that they show a little bit of common courtesy and respect others.

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    steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

    Great module and after seeing how much the private sector puts into this and have witnessed myself in the private sector, i feel the public sector would benefit greatly with using this a serious training requirement. One thing that struck me was the use of empathy in EI. When we have empathy to see someone else point of view and try to understand why they may feel the way they do, we should not take there feeling so personal. I strive to be happy every day and plan to use emotional intelligence to assist in prevent myself from not have emotional control at all time. This along with limiting drama and stress in our lives can help us lead a more purposeful life for others.

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    sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

    Since my first day on duty, i honestly never thought or knew about anything about emotional intelligence i continued to believe this is just my personality, and nothing more of it. After this lecture, i have been able to self reflect and evaluate myself, my E.I. strengths and and even begrudgingly my weaknesses. I've always been aware of my control over my emotions to the point that I've been nick named "Mr. Spock." Even Commanders in my Department have made comments how calm i am even under stressful training and they've always found it amusing. Motivation and empathy have never been a problem within my E.I., my true weakness which is constantly on my mind and I'm attempting to fix is my Social Skills. i am aware outside of uniform, i have almost no social skill whatsoever and wanting desperately and eager to learn.

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      Adam Gonzalez

      Like you, I kind of thought that this was something that just came with the territory for those of us in law enforcement. Instead, we have learned that this important understanding is vital to all people, regardless of career or education. There was so much to learn throughout this module and I feel like I was drinking water from a fire hose. Here is to continued vigilance in caring enough about others to truly understand them first before trying to simply be understood!

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      mmoscona@floodauthority.org

      Your comment struck a cord with me. It took me loosing two wives to learn the fact that outside of the job my people skills quite frankly sucked. My third wife opened my eyes to this and though it has taken awhile, the wall that was built over the last forty years in law enforcement had begun to come down.

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    chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

    Learning about Module 3 about Practical Emotional Intelligence is a huge eye opener. Without having Emotional Intelligence you're unable to connect to Social Intelligence, when in law enforcement you have to have both because having the Social Intelligence is connecting with the public, and once connected with the public you have to have your emotions in tact in order to provide the right answer. This lesson was really good because it tells you that you have to know what are your "hot buttons" and once you realize those buttons you have to keep the emotional side of it in control, so the advice given is to take a step back and breath to gather your thoughts. This is a good lecture that all law enforcement officers can relate to.

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      cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

      I agree this was a good lecture. It made me think about taking a step back and thinking about what is fixing to come out of my mouth. I think if we all just take a moment and think before we speak we would all be better off.

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        guttuso_fa@jpso.com

        What you are saying is one of the best pieces of advise I was given by my former commander when i was promoted to my current position. And that was if I have to take disciplinary action is to not rush into a decision and let your emotions control your thinking. Give it a day or two to let those initial emotions dissipate before making those types of decisions.

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        I completely agree with you about learning to take a moment before speaking during certain situations. There have been times where I spoke before digesting the event and let my emotions get the better of me. Now that I'm more mature, I feel as if I have a better grasp of this and it makes me a more effective leader.

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    cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

    This was a good module. I liked when he talked about the waiter in the restaurant being less then pleasant when he asked him for a bowl. This lecture made me think about some of the people I have come in contact with over the years who are the same exact way. Emotional intelligence is very important in our line of work. As supervisors and training staff we should place an emphasis on emotional intelligence and teach our deputies how to leave a good first impression.

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    guttuso_fa@jpso.com

    I found this module very interesting. It definitely made me take a look at myself. Especially, the key steps in behaviors. I believe I am good with several of the behaviors but I need to work on a few others. So much of my current position relies on all of these behaviors. The cognitive intelligence is there for the most part but I can definitely see that the behaviors play a much bigger role as I deal with many more people on an emotional basis at this point in my career.

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    Before this address, Emotional Intelligence was a term that I was completely unfamiliar with. However, as the lecture continued, I realized that what I had perceived as self-control and maturity was Emotional Intelligence. In law enforcement, we must monitor numerous factors while on the job to ensure that we make the correct decision. If we cannot control our own emotions while at work, how are we able to correctly address the issues of the community and ensure a favorable outcome for all of those involved. The lesson on Emotional Intelligence opened my eyes in a way to better control my emotions as well as observing and reacting correctly to the feelings of others.

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    Adam Gonzalez

    "80%-85% of police complaints are made by how people were made to feel"-Daniel Golman. I have learned through this module that this is exactly the essence of emotional intelligence. Another important quote, again attributed to Daniel Golman is "People don't leave companies, they leave bad bosses". This particular module was intensely interesting to me as I have experienced this kind of e.i., or lack thereof, throughout my own career. I to have left one agency because of a bad boss and the strong reassurance that, though the top echelon of the agency was fully aware of the fact, nothing would be done about it. I learned in greater detail the importance of harnessing a vitally aware e.i. and how to put it to work with those with which I serve.

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    clouatre_kj@jpso.com

    This module has definitely made me evaluate my own ways of handling personnel. Without emotional intelligence, understanding and having empathy for others, it is difficult to understand why others are behaving in a certain manner, or their work product is a certain way. I have certainly changed over the length of my career, noticing that I have improved in some areas, but still need improvement. It can be difficult to motivate personnel when you are unaware of the personal experiences, but once getting through this, can be a great experience to watch the individual improve themselves by simply listening to them, whether it be a personal issue or a bad work experience.

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      I completely agree with you. It has been a career to change some things. As the lecture says though using EQ does not always give the other party a nice calm reply and that is where I think people misunderstand. Sometimes the straight forward answer is the best and being blunt serves both parties well.

      Like you I have improved in some areas and declined in others that I need to work on. One way that I tripped in to knowing more about employs' situations was running and scheduling details. In a small agency, like ours, officers would come to me when a spouse was out of work, child getting married, illness, bills got out of hand and so on. By officers coming to me, and knowing their personal situation, I could try to help, financially, through details, or if they needed some other type of help, maybe make a call.

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    This lecture is a good "fall back" moment in your career to re-evaluate how you handle situations. For example, overreacting to a "call" that was likely to be resolved with simple conversation could escalate. Showing up to a scene and handling it as the "routine" call out (i.e. acting in many hats we wear) may really help a person out. The ability to handle a person's "crisis" moment may seem "minuscule" to the observer, but it may mean the world to the person who called or needs help. Always attempt to be resolute in any situation and it will provide the desired results people always seek. That is applicable to interacting the people we work with, regardless of the role we play.

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    This was a very good lecture, and not my first time seeing some of it. There should be no question as to whether law enforcement should use these skills and concepts. The real question should be how do we present this for use by officers and leaders? We have all seen the same reactions for any initiative, especially one that talks about feelings. The "old Salty" referred to in some of the previous posts hears emotion or feelings and shuts down

    In a lot of ways, law enforcement has been employing emotional intelligence for years with different terminology and in some cases only to higher or specialized positions. The conclusions sound quite a bit like the advice I received as a young MP and later as a rookie officer and that I have seen given to others. Be aware of your surroundings and yourself. Do not go to work so mad that you can't think straight. Learn to control your emotions, refrain from yelling at a citizen or the wife/husband, unless called for. Apply the ten second rule. I was told from day 1, unless it is life threatening, you have all the time you need. Finally train the brain. That sounds suspiciously like play the what if game.

    As for the number of complaints against officers due to feelings, you got us. I had an officer that I could tell when he and his wife were fighting. He would make a traffic stop and I would get a complaint. In trying to talk to him about this, all I got was he had seen other guys do it. It took this man years to learn the correlation between emotions and complaints. As not to throw anyone under the bus but, is there anyone reading this that has not taken a mental day? I know I have either from fatigue from working so many hours or I needed a break.

    Sorry to get on the soap box for a bit, the thing that sticks out for me, from the lecture, are the tips for improving our EQ such as self-appraisal, Self-talk, learning our hot buttons, emotional literacy, reading cues in ourselves and others, determining practical or emotional problems, and taking that break to make the decision.

    As for my comment about higher or specialized positions utilizing this, SWAT, Crisis Intervention, and Negotiators have been stressing these skills for years as lifesaving. In addition, successful detectives and interrogators live by some of these skills. As leaders we should make this a priority in academies and in service. If applied correctly, this can only assist the officer, at every level.

    Kenneth Pinkston

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    mmoscona@floodauthority.org

    I think we have all heard the saying "never make a decision when angry". This goes to the heart of EI. We must always try to control our emotions in order to make rational and proper decisions. Self awareness is the key. My biggest take away was the information provided by Daniel Goleman that Emotional Intelligence can be learned and developed at any age.

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      blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree with you. When I started my career, I was told to be as proactive as I could. For example, if someone would speed, write them a ticket. If you get to a call and you can make an arrest, make the arrest. There was no sympathy or compassion. As I learned in my career and involved, I learned that is not the case. I believe building our Emotional Intelligence to strengthen our bond with our communities and fellow officers.

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    Lt. Mark Lyons

    I found this training topic to be very interesting. Prior to participating in this training module, I had never heard of the term Emotional Intelligence. When it comes to the emotional aspects of the job, the agency I work for has always focused on mental and emotional preparation as it relates to officer safety and awareness. After watching the training video, I ended up with a deeper understanding of the many different components of EI and how it applies to law enforcement.

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      dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

      Lt.,

      I'm sure we've all dealt with emotional intelligence, we just never knew it. You remember the old saying, "common sense isn't so common?' I think emotional intelligence falls into this saying. Regardless, cops are not very aware that we can actually relay our experiences as well as we can until we're able to relate to the material and also the topic of discussion.

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    dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

    Emotional Intelligence discussed in this section is something consistently overlooked in law enforcement. I think it is a topic we could all use more training on. I for one was struggling with this as a young supervisor. I have learned several ways to control this since attending ICLD I-IV. There have been numerous times that I have typed a response to an email in anger and before would have immediately sent it. A lot of times I would regret what was said in the emails. I now take that angry response and print it out. I then read the email and usually end up writing another email once, I have taken the time to collect my thoughts and have a "cooling off" period. I am proof that EI can be developed and at any point in a career.

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    dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

    As a trainer, I can tell you that emotional intelligence is not something out of the realm of possibility to teach. What is the reason why law enforcement does not explain this? The idea is that we didn't realize what it was and that we are capable of doing so. One of the key factors I found to profound is empathy. Being empathic, not sympathetic, to what our brothers and sisters are doing in their day to day. More often than not, it is assumed that other divisions within an agency are not busy. That is not the case. What is lacking is the understanding of what others are doing and being empathic to what that entails. We get so wrapped up in rumors and falsehoods of our surroundings that we become numb to those we serve with.

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      cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree Darren that it is easy for us to become numb or lack awareness and empathy to those we serve with. Such a profound statement.

      It is so easy to get caught in up in what we as individuals or divisions are trying to accomplish that we sometimes lost sight of the big picture, the common goal, trying to help improve ourselves, our agency, our community and essentially each other.

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      I really enjoyed your comment and how it was directed internal to the agency. I think a lot of us get wrapped up in thinking of EI as an external issue, particularly when it comes to line staff, and how we deal with the public. Understanding the roles within the organization can certainly lead to a more productive work environment, rather than a competitive or downright destructive one. I see that as prevalent in my agency as well and this happens consistently with individuals until they move into and work different divisions and gain the understanding from the driver's seat.

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    blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

    I think that Emotional Intelligence was not a training topic in law enforcement because of time and money. As we grow as an agency now, I believe that any agency that does not train Emotional Intelligence will not build trust and bond with the community. These days with social media, it is essential to show people that we will make the right decisions and show compassion. By learning Emotional Intelligence, officers will become better people as well as leaders.

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    dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

    While firearms training, defensive tactics training, and law updates are essential in our profession, after reviewing this module, I can now understand how emotional intelligence is also crucial. Every agency has the one officer who, when he or she arrives on scenes, tend to make the situation worse just by talking. Far too many times have we seen officers escalate situations with their words, or body language, that cause a controlled scene to go awry.

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    cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

    I really enjoyed this Module on Emotional Intelligence. Those of us in law enforcement (both enforcement and support staff) are required to use this on a regular basis in descaling situations whether it is in situations involving use of force, phone calls, interviews, taking complaints, or trying to communicate with one another. Sometimes it is so crucial to take a time out and focus on the practical problem rather than our emotions to be able to successfully resolve a particular situation.

    It is so easy to get caught in the day to day operations and to lose awareness of what may be affecting you or those around you. This module is a great reminder to all of us to remember to be more self-aware of ourselves and others.

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    I agree emotional intelligence is a quality that is vital when hiring entry-level employees. When our department interview new employees they are asked questions that relates to their character. In the past, we hired individuals who possess technical and cognitive skills however lacked emotional intelligence. Unfortunately, that culture has not completely change for promotions. After learning more about the importance of having emotional intelligence I am confident that more people that work with my agency will change their way of thinking. The old way of doing things will soon be non-existence. A person will no longer be promoted based solely off their cognitive and technical skills.

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      Sergeant James Schueller

      I hadn't thought or read any information on this until this module, but you are right- emotional intelligence is vital as we higher entry level employees. I just sat on an interview panel this week for a first level supervisor eligibility roster within my agency. After viewing this module and reading your post, I believe a question that delves into that area of the candidates would have provided more insight into the "person" and not the position we we interviewing for. I This concept definitely has its place for both the new hire and promoted spots, including administrative positions. I hope I can look back in a few years and see that your last statement became true for our agency.

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        Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

        That would be another game changer at my agency; adding a level of testing on emotional intelligence for new hires and promotions.

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    dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

    The peter principle stood out in the fact that they are definitely people that are promoted to their level of incompetence. A lot of times as someone posted in a previous discussion board that the person was the only person to put in for the job opening. i am not sure what you do in those instances, do you give the person the job even though that don't have the qualifications. I feel that all promotions and transfers should come with a 6 or 9 month probationary period in that time you will know if this person has the emotional intelligence to fulfill the requirements of the position.

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      Lt. Joseph Flavin

      I feel there should be some sort of emotional intelligence aptitude test administered as part of the hiring process. That way, someone who doesn't have the desired emotional intelligence required for a supervisory position would be weeded out in the process. When it comes to hiring someone because they were the only one that put in for the position, if that happens I think that departments have to look into why and reconsider if they need that position moving forward. The department I work for has a one year probationary period for supervisors. The emotional intelligence aspect is key and I will be relaying that to my supervisor for future hiring processes.

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    Sergeant James Schueller

    This was a very interesting and enlightening module. First off, I found it very interesting that self-awareness was front and center to so may of the learning concepts. It makes sense, especially after viewing the lecture, but was interesting how it corresponds to so may aspects of emotional intelligence. I also took a lot from Daniel Goleman’s vignette, but especially like his explanation that emotional intelligence is a profile, not a score. That stood out to me, and really explained the complexity of the subject. Next was the 3 domains of ability, and the revelation that the emotional intelligence range is twice as important as the first two (cognitive and technical expertise) combined in terms of a good leader. The two examples used here were very illustrative- the “Peter Principle” and the waiter and restaurant analogy. I really felt like the section on “Eight Different Uses of Emotional Intelligence” was going to be my “Aha” moment for this section (especially #6 Identify problems before they escalate) and I have to admit- the emotional hijacking snake video example to illustrate emotional hijacking was hilarious. However, the one that I took the most from was the “Seven steps to improving emotional intelligence in law enforcement”. Steps 1 and 2 really tie into implicit bias training. Steps 5 and 6 illustrated identifying the physical and mental cues associated with anger and other negative emotions, as well as providing useful definitions for the practical vs emotional problems issue. All in all, a very interesting and relevant module.

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    Lt. Joseph Flavin

    This was a very enlightening module for me. When Daniel Goleman said that while IQ is going up, EQ is going down. Being intelligent and being emotionally intelligent are two very separate forms of intelligence as it pertains to leadership. I thought that was explained very well. When the subject of emotional intelligence and law enforcement was talked about, the stat that was thrown out; 80-85% of complaints are about how an officer made someone feel, really stuck out to me. Looking back at complaints members of the public have made about our deputies, that stat remains true. Being cognizant of your emotions, keeping them in check, and having the ability to empathize with others will eliminate the majority of complaints departments receive. I also found the 7 steps to improving emotional intelligence in law enforcement very educational.

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    Deputy Mitchell Gahler

    This module discussed many key points regarding emotional intelligence and the effectiveness it has above cognitive ability and technical expertise. Although the other two domain of abilities are important, emotional intelligence was identified as being two times more important and a more effective skill set. The module explained how emotional intelligence continues to be learned, which will then make your life and effectiveness in your career, better. As I reviewed this module, and then responded to a call for service, it was unique in return how I applied the five skill sets during a stressful situation. I first of all was self-aware of my feelings and how I was able to manage my emotions during the event in order to control my stress. It was rewarding to identify how individuals were feeling during the event without them describing their feelings to me, which gave me the capability to empathize, as I had dealt with a similar type event with a family member in the past. I was able to utilize my social skills while empathizing with them which made it easier to diffuse the situation resulting in a positive outcome. As this call for service was concluded, those skill sets provided me with more positive motivation to utilize in future situations which will hopefully provide the same outcome. This module was very effective and rewarding, as I was able to utilize some of the information provided to endure a positive outcome. It was unique to practice during a real-life event which led to a rewarding outcome.

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    Deputy Mitchell Gahler

    Lt. Flavin, a portion of this module that I thought about and looked back at was how critical it is for all of us to be leaders, not only at a supervisory level. While dealing with the public and presenting ourselves as professionals, it's important to display ourselves as leaders in order to gain the respect and trust from each situation. It appears critical, as law enforcement as a whole is currently dealing with critical times. If all of us could learn to manage and understand our emotions, our decision making and actions may provide a more positive experience for the public which could redirect their judgement towards law enforcement as a more positive experience. The module couldn't have explained it better. If once person within your organization has a negative representation, it could effect your department as a whole.

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      I totally agree with your message and thoughts. If we can get all of our officers to have those positive experiences, trying to work with others and better understand and explain the situation, I think law enforcement nation wide would be in a little better position.

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    I have heard of emotional intelligence on several occasions prior to this module and have taken a couple of courses where references to Daniel Goleman’s book are heavily utilized. I will fully admit that I have not read Mr. Goleman’s book and I was actually surprised his book was not on the required reading list for this course, particularly due to the weight the module instructor dedicates to learning, practicing and developing emotional intelligence. I learned some about the history of social and emotional intelligence; that the thought process of being successful has a lot more to do with this topic rather than cognitive or technical skills. And now having the foundation of the five qualities (self-awareness, managing emotions, motivation, empathy and social skills) coupled with the three domains (cognitive or threshold abilities, technical ability and emotional intelligence), I can really begin to focus my effort in areas I need to improve. How will I do that? I will start by asking those I supervise and those I trust to give me honest criticism how I am doing with each quality and in each domain. I want to improve because I want to make a difference in the professional and personal lives of whom I consider I serve, not the other way around. I really enjoyed Mr. Goleman’s comment about letting people go from a company; that it matters because everyone is watching. I believe everyone watches their supervisor, and other supervisors, and how we treat them day in and day out matters. I can, and will, always continue to better myself and improve on my four branches (perception, reasoning, understanding and managing) of emotional intelligence by practicing the eight different ways to improve. And I will read Mr. Goleman’s book before the end of this course.

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      Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

      I did the same thing, as the lecture continued on I really began to take stock in areas that I could improve on with emotional intelligence. There is always that talk in law enforcement about the “it factor” that some officers have. But we can never really define what “it” is. We all know the officers who have the ability to talk a suicidal person off of a ledge, a 250-pound body builder into handcuffs without a use of force, motivating the unmotivated officer who is down and burnt out, all within the span of 1 shift. Maybe emotional intelligence is that “it factor.” The ability to truly recognize, listen, and understand people.

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      I like your reference to Mr. Goldman's thoughts that everyone is watching how we treat our employees. I always try to remember that not everyone you supervise is going to remember what you asked them to do but most employees will always remember how you made them feel.

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      I agree with many aspects of this statement. Emotional intelligence seems like a modern buzzword but I learned in this presentation that the concepts have been discussed since the 1930's. Academy courses always seem to focus on the cognitive and technical skills required to be a supervisor but not the intrinsic tools of self control, emotional management, communication skills and social awareness to truly be successful leaders. As a leader, the statement that "everyone watches their supervisor, and other supervisors, and how we treat them" really resonated the most for me. It reminds me that I set the example even if I think no one is watching me and that I have to continue to improve myself at every opportunity.

      Dave G.

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        Maja Donohue

        You're absolutely right. I think that this is the missing link in academy communications training. You cannot be a great communicator without having good emotional intelligence, and the good news is that we can teach these skills. I think that most of the challenges we face our organizations can be mitigated with increased emotional intelligence.

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    Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

    This module very clearly defined the important differences for me between technical skills and emotional intelligence. The portion of the lecture that really drew me in was when Mr. Daniel Goleman mentioned that emotional intelligence was just as important than IQ and technical skills combined.
    For me, I feel that the first step to improving and growing my emotional intelligence was focusing more on active listening to other people that I am conversing with. Without active listening is a conversation really happening? I would say probably not. I think that with active listening that is one of the first steps in improving and growing empathy for persons. I can think back to heated conversations I have had with persons on calls (domestics, person in crisis calls, disorderly conduct, etc…) and recognize that I was not truly listening to what persons were trying to convey to me (both verbally and non-verbally), in contrast they were probably not listening to much of what I was saying. However, as law enforcement we have the responsibility to be the first persons to show that we are empathetic to the other persons needs. Maybe this will lead to the other person slowing down and opening up to our discussion and conversation.
    Just these simple things can lead to a more positive contact with persons even if we agree to disagree. These steps can also lead to a decline in use of force incidents as well as complaints. As mentioned in the lecture 80-85% of complaints received in law enforcement are stemming from how a person felt after police interaction.

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    There was a lot of information in this module. Emotional Intelligence is one of the most important pieces for each person and for a supervisor to understand in order to respond appropriately in many situations.
    The 80 to 85% rule I strongly agree with. The 80 to 85% rule references that a majority of complaints we receive stem from how we made a citizen feel during our contact with them. I think that even to take this step further and incorporating communication. For example, I have noticed that often times when people are upset their emotions stem from a lack of communication or explanation of the situation. In most situations, if our Deputies take a little more time trying to understand a persons problem, and take the time to communicate and explain processes, procedures it really goes a long way. Most of the time when I field complaints it's because the Deputy did not take the time to do these things. Law Enforcement is mostly about changing behavior and that can be done through many different approaches. If law enforcement officers slow things down and try to understand the offenders point of view, explain processes, procedures and work with people we can typically garner trust, cooperation and will often times reduce complaints.

    I also like the 4 techniques to help with increasing our emotional intelligence skills. First, always be aware of your emotional status. Second, learn to control your emotional triggers. Third, apply the ten second rule. And Finally, train your brain to act accordingly, subconsciously, by practicing or training through situations before they occur. I think that if a person keeps this "recipe" in mind they can gain a high level of emotional intelligence and they will make good sound decisions.

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      Gregory Hutchins

      How emotions drive a significant amount of our complaints is vital for officers to understand better. The challenge is for our junior officers to understand the effects it has on the organization’s mission and vision when their actions, while seemingly inconsequential, have a lasting impact on many others. We as leaders spend a precious commodity, time, addressing, and repairing relationships with our customers, the community as a result of one individual’s low emotional literacy and maturity. I hold hope that our profession embraces emotional intelligence and its components, and only then will we be able to turn the tide of public perception through our collective ability to effectively communicate, be socially aware, be better at conflict resolution, all while managing our emotions more effectively.

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    Out of all the topics we covered this one is by far the most interesting. Knowing oneself and how you will react in a situation when it spirals out of control is worth its weight in gold. There has been a shift in law enforcement from brute force to thoughtful force...if that makes sense. With all the demands placed on police in this day and age, you really do need to be able to know about not only your emotional intelligence but how to see it in others.

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      Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

      I agree, using emotional intelligence in our daily works provides an element of clarity and slowing things down to see the bigger picture.

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      Great analysis. The shift in law enforcement you speak of is very real. While officers still need to be able to bring the fight at times, the majority of the time is better spent on community policing efforts. Emotional intelligence often prevents us from having to bring the fight.

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    Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

    Discussion comment for Module 3

    Increasing your Emotional intelligence will go a long way for law enforcement officers to control hostile situations. It can only be a benefit for the officer

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    Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

    My entire life I have been drawn to emotional psyche. It has enhanced my friendships, family life and career. Leadership training has been a huge game changer for the agency I work for. The IA complaints have lessened and use of force has also lessened with the correctional facility. Once allow young officers to learn how to express themselves better and to understand others emotions you move as a whole in a positive direction.

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      Sergeant Matt Wieland

      It is great that IA's and complaints have gone down with EI based trainings. Teaching young officers how to control their own emotions to better control an outcome is something that I wished was around when I was in my early 20's maturing in life and in this career. I can definitely see the relationship between having a better handle on your emotional responses and a lower complaint rate, especially since the majority of officer complaints are about how the officer makes a person feel after the encounter.

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    Lt. Marlon J Shuff

    In the law enforcement profession, we seem to emphasize cognitive skills such as intellect and problem-solving. We often put less value on the emotional intelligence skills such as self-perception and the interpersonal skills needed to build and maintain relationships. Personally speaking, this has been an area where I have found myself needing improvement. Over time, I've realized that communication and human relation skills are just as essential as our profession's other skills.

    Marlon Shuff

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    Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

    Early in my career, I welcomed everything in task/ lessons as a toss-up. The explanation for this is I was being taught by very pessimistic and negative deputies. Sometimes it appeared that everyone had the same attitude. Emotionally, negatively, and uncooperative in just about every task. Eventually, I started to ponder carefully, and back away from the negative, and damaging people and started making conscious decisions to change the way I thought about my job. At the beginning of my career exceeding for me and my family was a must. I began to use social awareness and conflict resolutions skills that created the deputy that I have developed into.
    It is our job as supervisors to assist our personnel and help them avoid negativity. I always use personalized stories to uplift, motivate, and encourage my peers. In doing this, I hope my effective communication tactics will be a pillar of strength to aid my them further in their career.

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    Ryan Manguson

    This module was very informative on emotional intelligence and its importance in leadership. Although I had received some training on EI from my department as part of our Police Training Officer program, this helped put it even more in perspective. I was particularly interested in the comment made by Dr. Goleman about EI being twice as important as cognitive and technical skills in successful business leaders, and that cognitive abilities and technical skills are best used to assess entry level thresholds. EI should be integrated into more department trainings.

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      Sergeant Durand Ackman

      I'm glad I wasn't the only one intrigued by the comment about emotional intelligence being twice as important! I agree this was more in depth than other trainings I've received previously and it absolutely should be integrated more.

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    I agree with Daniel Goleman in that Emotional Intelligence seems to be more important as you move up in an organization and that it's application begins at the lowest level of an organization. When I went to the police academy in the mid 90's, there was no class on emotional intelligence and how this skill could be cultivated to manage the outcomes of chaotic situations. I learned about it from my peers. As a young deputy, I saw how more experienced deputy's talked their way out of having to fight with suspects. This was my first exposure to emotional intelligence. At the time, I did not know what the exact term for this was but I knew that it could help me be successful in my job. As I progressed through the ranks, I learned exactly what emotional intelligence was. I saw the benefits of being self aware, managing my emotions (AKA ..don't write tickets when your having a bad day) sensing the emotions of others and being empathetic. Now, as a senior commander in my agency, I have been successful in initiating positive change specifically because of my understanding of emotional intelligence. I am better able to read people, manage my own emotions and make better decisions both personally and operationally. I have even included some of my "pet peeves" (hot buttons) in the expectations I review with all newly hired officers. I was once personally thanked by a suspect for the thoughtful way I treated her during a warrant arrest. Conversely, I have been on the receiving end of a citizen complaint because they felt a subordinate made them feel demeaned or disrespected. Emotional intelligence is key to officer success/ self-fulfillment, leadership success and the success of a department.

    Dave G.

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      Cynthia Estrup

      Dave,

      I agree with what you are saying, I too attended the academy in the late 90's. We had a very small introduction to "Verbal Judo" which I took away "Feels good. No good." and based that mantra on my career, and truth be told in my personal life too. At times when our emotions seem to have the best of us, we want to say things that will allow us to vent and deflect. That really does not resolve the underlying issue and will just be quick to escalate the situation. Over the past 20+ years, this has been called many different things, but now really identifying what it is and showing how it can be useful could be part of a change many of us need to continue to embrace.

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    Cynthia Estrup

    As law enforcement officers we spend a lot of time training tactics and ensuring we are current in changing trends in laws. However, we sometimes lack the emotional tact to maintain calm and control in our every day contacts. We use emotional intelligence to have a better understanding of ourselves, but also to be able to relate to the community we serve. It also allows us to be more successful at communicating with all people. This has become a continued expectation in our field. We need to be able to communicate in a way that people don't just hear what we are saying, but are able to relate to the feelings behind it. We utilize these skills both on the road as well as in the office as managers.

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      I so agree. We can deescalate so many satiations through effective use of our emotional intelligence. Working in a diverse area so many things are conveyed non verbally. Being able to read a person goes far beyond the spoken word.

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      Jacqueline Dahms

      Very true. I agree with you about people not just hearing what we say but relating to the feelings. Communicating and having emotional intelligence is becoming more and more important in our day to day lives. I believe we are going to see a big boom in E.I. training over the next couple years. In the last two years these types of trainings have increased. I also think if someone WANTS to improve in this area, they will. I feel like there are a lot of people that I know, that don't care to improve.

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    Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

    I found this lecture to be very informative and applicable to my current position. One of the statements which stood out to me was that 80-85% of complaints on an officer are due to how they made people feel. It's often said that 90% of our job is be an effective communicator, thus having the skills of emotional intelligence should be at the forefront of our training both during skills and on the job training is imperative to our success.

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    Sergeant Chad Blanchette

    In my opinion, the area that summed up this module the best is the section that covered “Circles of Emotional Intelligence”. I thought this tied it all together. Working from the most inner portion of the circle, Self-Awareness to the outermost circle, Motivation, made the most sense to me. In Law Enforcement, the ability to manage what is going on in our own head and heart is the first major step to be able to handle what is going on with the people around us.

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    Sergeant Matt Wieland

    Emotional Intelligence as it relates to Law Enforcement is not given the thought or time that it deserves. So much of what a law enforcement officer deals with on a day to day basis can benefit from improved EI. Training in EI should happen regularly, just like Crisis Intervention training as the 2 are similar. I think officers would appreciate the training once they learned that it was just as much about looking internally as it is looking externally at the subject(s) we are dealing with. Managing our own emotions and reactions to difficult situations can give us more power to understand someone else which helps us to steer outcomes in our favor. The concept of EI shows that people continue to develop EI throughout life, similar to the concept of mental maturity. With this known, it only benefits LE agencies to develop their new/young officers' EI early on, because then you have a more effective officer and probably one with better overall mental health. With our increased focus on both mental and physical wellness for officers, why wouldn't we make EI development a top priority?

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      Kyle Phillips

      Matt, I think your absolutely right that we need to start training on EI like we do with firearms, UOF, and other tools we use on a daily basis. After learning more about EI, I feel it should be a goal of everyone in this class as a leader to start that process within our agencies, weather talking with administration about bringing in training or actively working with those we supervise/peers.

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      Timothy Sandlin

      I agree completely. Emotional intelligence development should be included within an officers training each year and reinforced just as other critical skills. I like your point on emotional intelligence and the connection to officer well-being and mental health.

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    Kyle Phillips

    I had heard of emotional intelligence prior to this module, but the way it was explained helped me better understand how emotional intelligence relates to the relationships in our lives. After Goleman explained his story about his classmates and how he correlated their long term success to associate with their emotional intelligence, it seamed to make sense that this was a key component to success. I couldn't help but think of several of my own interactions over the years, where I did not achieve my desired results from interactions with co-workers, family, friends, suspects/victims/witnesses and how emotional intelligence may have contributed to a different outcome.

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      Brad Strouf

      I agree Kyle. Goleman's classmate story resonated with me as well. As did the discussion on the Peter Principle. Not only will I be applying what have I learned personally, I will also attempt to self monitor as I mentor and lead.

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      Robert Schei

      I agree Kyle, the portion where Goleman talks about his classmate was very interesting to me as well. It should be fairly obvious that a lot of the times those who make the most money or are described as doing the best were not always the most intelligent or received the best grades. Most of those people in my experience are knowledgeable about their interests and can speak about them passionately and most if not all can easily connect with others.

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    Sergeant Durand Ackman

    I've heard about emotional intelligence quite a bit over the last couple of years. I've also seen the interview with Daniel Goleman previously so a lot of this was a review but still good information. The seven steps to improve emotional intelligence is something I can definitely use to improve my abilities. I may also share that with others because it seems like a good process to improve your skills. I found it very interesting that emotional intelligence was two times more important than cognitive ability and technical expertise combined. I've understood the importance of emotional intelligence but that stat was impressive, I re-watched that portion of the presentation just to make sure I understood it correctly.

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    Maja Donohue

    After watching Goleman’s interview, I concluded that my understanding of this topic is limited at best. For example, I was unaware that emotional intelligence is something that we can learn, and that it is a skill that naturally improves with age. I was also unaware that we can improve these skills with thought process training. And after reflecting on the subject further, all of it makes sense. It is common knowledge that 90% of our communication is nonverbal, and since emotional intelligence is centered on our ability to read and manage emotions, which in turn determine our body language and behavior, it is very obvious that this subject needs to be given significantly more attention in our line of work. Bottom line is, increased emotional intelligence will improve officer safety.

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    Jacqueline Dahms

    Emotional Intelligence is a new term for me. I have always chalked it up to personality; some people care, some people don’t. Some people learn to manage their emotions better than others over time. I really liked the breakdown of the skills needed for E.I. I can see the lack of E.I. in newer staff, they don’t realize how important it is to be able to communicate and understand people. I would agree this is likely a direct reflection of their supervisors. We have crisis intervention training which could be like a E.I. model. The view from senior staff that haven’t attended is usually negative. Newer staff are excited to attend. Either way it has become mandatory, along with officer resiliency, and it is important.

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      Eduardo Palomares

      Hello Jacqueline. E.I was also a new term for me. I had a belief that some people were "naturally" charming when dealing with people not knowing it was all about emotional intelligence. Over the years I have learned to develop patience and worked on regulating my emotions. It has definitely been a journey of ups and downs. As a supervisor, I will be more aware of my actions and emotions. I agree with you that crisis intervention training can be linked to the E.I. model as it focuses on very similar concepts. I wish I was introduced to this concept early on as I entered law enforcement. I would have helped me staying out of some difficult situations. Great post!

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    Eduardo Palomares

    After watching the video and conducting research on this topic, I learned that the root of success for people, especially leaders, originates from the effective use of emotional intelligence. As discussed on the lecture and video, self-awareness is a key element of emotional intelligence. Being aware of our emotions during difficult situations is the key to understanding how to deal with these situations. More emphasizes should be placed on proving law enforcement professionals with information on E.I. I know I could improve my leadership skills by using emotional intelligence when dealing with my subordinates and my superiors. It is important as leaders to practice emotional intelligence to foster happy healthy relationships at work. As a behavioral health crisis intervention instructor, emotional intelligence could greatly assist officers dealing with individuals affected by a mental illness. The proper use of E.I can minimize use of force incidents, citizen complaints and benefit law enforcement professionals dealing with the public, peers and supervisors. Emotional intelligence will be something I will be working to improve my people skills.

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      Very good point on the use of force relationship to EQ. The whole de-escalation thing fits right in here. If we take time to study and practice defusing people, we'll be better off. I have been on calls with certain officers who might as well have brought a bucket with gasoline to the call because the scenario exploded due to their lack of EQ.

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      I agree your statement, "emotional intelligence could greatly assist officers dealing with individuals affected by a mental illness. The proper use of E.I can minimize use of force incidents, citizen complaints and benefit law enforcement professionals dealing with the public, peers and supervisors." The majority of the complaints we get have nothing to do with force or action. The root of the complaint almost always goes back to how they were talked to. Most cases the complainant just wanted to be heard and the deputy didn't hear them out. Most of those times, there was no action we could have taken to help the person other than listen and offer some suggestions. A little "customer service" would have gone a long way.

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    Brad Strouf

    Practical Emotional Intelligence

    As the law enforcement profession continues to recognize the need for additional training(s), it only makes sense to incorporate “EI” training right into the curriculum. New officers should be receiving this training at an academy level along with ongoing training throughout one’s career. I imagine the use of force, the number of complaints and a number of other areas of concern would be impacted (positively) by agencies ensuring their officers and leaders were all aware of EI and trained appropriately.

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      Andy Opperman

      I totally agree Brad. Based on Daniel Goleman’s discussion it seems that Emotional intelligence is extremely important. While I realize that the state is being asked to add more and more curriculum as evidenced by the increase of our academies from 520 hours to 720’s, this training is a must. Training Emotional intelligence should be part of the Professional Communications Curriculum provided by the state. I believe it should also become part of our Field Training Program and could be added to the definition of interpersonal communication related to documentation in a Daily Observation Report. It is important to train officers in unified tactics based the probability of a life or death situation, but training officers in communication, and controlling and understanding emotions can also save lives and a lot of headache for the officer’s and supervisors.

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    Robert Schei

    I really enjoyed the conclusion to the lecture by Chief Deputy Mike Robinson. Chief Deputy Robinson challenged all of us to use 4 simple techniques to improve our emotional intelligence at work. Always be aware of your emotional status, learn to control your emotional triggers, allow yourself 10 seconds before responding to emotionally charged situations and train your brain exactly the same way that you train for holstering your weapon.
    If we all take some time to understand that typically our emotions dictate our responses vs. the facts we might respond more effectively. We all have been in situations where we wished we had taken a moment and thought prior to speaking - I for one hope to practice this more often.

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      Christopher Lowrie

      I also enjoyed the lecture. We would all be better off if we took 10 seconds when emotionally charged to respond to someone. I can think of many times I wish I had taken a moment and thought before speaking (my wife will second this).

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      Bou Gazley

      I found many aspects of this module interesting, but I agree the concept of training our EI just like you train with holstering your weapon. I know I would practice a draw and re-holster numerous times, especially if I made any changes (new holster, tac light, etc.). I had never really thought about practicing emotional intelligence. This is an area that I will certainly be looking more into because I feel it is not as strong as it should be.

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    Christopher Lowrie

    Watching and listing to Dr. Goleman was truly fascinating. I read his emotional intelligence book many years ago and had a general understanding. However this interview provided another layer to the book. I am always intrigued and impressed when people push a concept forward and it has the longevity of EI. His concept of how success is measured not just by admission tests and IQ scores is a great lesson. Never underestimate anyone and do not provide undying support based solely on high test scores. Dr. Goleman's interview caused me to reflect on a computer programmer I knew 25 years ago. The programmer was brilliant with a computer but lacked social skills to interact with others. Had he possessed IE his life would have been more successful.

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    Samantha Reps

    This lesson was a good reminder on how much body language plays a role in how we respond. Self reflection on what my body language is saying when you are talking to someone can make the situation worse or better. Taking the time to make sure your body language is in check when you are having conversations should be considered by taking distractions away and focusing your attention. At the end of the lesson it was said we should "be aware, control emotional triggers, apply the ten second rule and train your brain by conscious thought'. These are all achievable goals that we can add to our daily lives in the leadership role.

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      Sergeant Paul Gronholz

      Certainly body language is a much better indicator of emotions. Included with body language is facial expresssions. I enjoyed the exercise we did in the lesson about recognizing facial expressions. It's important to keep body language in mind when communicating with others because when what a person saying and what their body says differ, people tend to believe the body language.

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    Andy Opperman

    I found this lesson very informative. Its funny because I talk with my oldest son all the time about different types of intelligence. He is a great student and good at math. He's in advanced math getting good grades and gives me a hard time about algebra. I think he feels that Math makes him intelligent. While I am very proud of his drive and IQ, I try to explain to him all time that there is a lot more to intelligence then just getting good grades. I have found that being driven and being composed has gotten me further in live then any "A" in a class ever did. Don't get me wrong I feel that getting good grades is important, but Daniel Goleman's discussion on emotional intelligence was spot on. I can't tell you the people that I have worked with in my career that I felt were very book smart, and a minute later they would get angry with one of their co-workers, losing control of their emotions. I do believe the many good police officer learn emotional intelligence just in experience related to sheer call volume, but it really does take practice. I almost wonder sometimes if officers become too good at it. How many times does an officer’s spouse look at them and think we’re is the emotion? Maybe some of that is just that the officer learned to control their emotional response, and it becomes hard to flip that switch on and off. It does concern me some, that we are training our children in topics mostly related to IQ and not as much emotional intelligence. Daniel Goleman's discussion on what companies are looking for and what companies are getting like the big tech example he gave is eye opening.

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      Excellent points made Andy.

      1. I have 5 children and can fully appreciate what you're saying about IQ vs. EQ. The smartest (IQ) of the bunch can be dumber than a bag of hammers when it comes to EQ. This helps explain my point about EQ being a learned skill that we definitely mature in overtime. I can say wholeheartedly that 20 years ago I was a dunce when it came to EQ. I've learned and continue to learn.
      2. The spouse scenario; spot on! I found your comment laughable because I bet a vast majority of us have ample stories about comments made by a spouse related to our emotions or how we handle scenarios. By sheer nature of our jobs is the reason we're so level when it comes to debate or arguments. At least I'd like to think.

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    Sergeant Paul Gronholz

    I found this lesson to be very rewarding and helped to reinforce and revisit concepts that are crucial for success as a leader. I had heard much of what was was covered in the past, but I appreciated the way that it was delivered and the easy steps for how to become more emotionally intelligent. Developing my emotional intelligence and that of the people I supervise is key to the success of our organization.

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      Marshall Carmouche

      I agree, Sergeant Gronholz. that the lesson will help reinforce concepts for successful leaders. I think being able to control emotions shows maturity and wisdom in an individual, especially a law enforcement professional. As law enforcement professionals we are constantly in the "public eye". Now more than ever we need to harness our emptions for sound decision making.

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    Daniel Goleman's book, Emotional Intelligence was a carry-over from the ICLD series and a good refresher for this course. I found the book to be very "smart" and it took a little longer to fully read through it and grasp all its concepts. In summary, I have come to realize that emotional intelligence (EQ) is learned as we mature and gain more experience. I do think reading and studying the topic is a good idea for leaders and in particular law enforcement leaders. Who hasn't had their buttons pushed, and pushed hard, in this line of work? I wish I knew some of these concepts when I was a rookie officer, I would have likely handled things differently in various scenarios.

    The key takeaways for me in this module revolve around how I treat my subordinates, especially when getting angry would surely be understandable. Over time and in dealing with many internal conflicts I've come to realize that a cool head keeps the issues on the ground and the exact opposite occurs when we try and resolve issues with anger or emotion. Most instances can be handled in a manner that keeps emotion in check and is acceptable by all involved.

    One last comment, group think among a diverse group of leaders and be disastrous. In other words, I may be calm but one or two of my peers may not have the EQ appropriate for the scenario. They may add fuel to the fire per see causing me or someone else to handle a scenario in a calm manner vs a heated one.

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      The hardest part for me dealing with a mistake is taking out my emotions. Because we all know its not the first, second, or even third time we have addressed the same issue on a squad or division. That fourth time always hits when everything else is going wrong. Governing your emotions is a legit skill.

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      I had a boss that used to say "never type angry". Through many of my leadership failures, I've learned that he was right. If something has me wound up, I really try to put some thought into an email before a "reply all" is sent. I've often joked that our agency ought to have soundproof rooms in every building where employees can go and yell/scream to let out negative emotions. It would be very therapeutic.

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    "Promoting to their level of incompetence", I could completely relate to this statement. Law enforcement promoting practices are finally starting to catch up with this notion. The basic idea that promotion is based on years of service, technical proficiency, a test, or even by who you know has longed plagued this profession. This has lead to incompetent leaders and stressful work environment's for subordinates. The idea of promoting based on the ability to lead by influencing the ones around you seems to finally be in the picture.

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      Sergeant Kelly Lee

      William, I couldn't agree with you more and this is the very thing I wrote about in my discussion. The "old" way of doing business are quickly fading and no longer acceptable. We need to and will be held to a higher standard and as you said that starts with growing the appropriate people to promote and be the future of the department. Hopefully as turn over in the departments happens the new way of leadership will begin to take over and change.

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      Adam Kronstedt

      I had to chuckle a bit reading that. We have a couple deputies of higher seniority than most, that have verbally stated during Sgt's interviews that they believe they deserve a promotion because they've been here longer than the other candidates applying for the position. Needless to say, these specific deputies haven't demonstrated the ability to positively influence those around them.

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    Emotional Intelligence seems like it’s an academic way of studying/teaching/understanding something that we ALL do. The value of controlling our emotions and perceiving, analyzing, and reacting to other's emotions is something most all humans learn to do during childhood.

    We teach it to some extent in Police academies. The instructors place cadets into stressful situations and the cadets learn that if they cannot control their emotions there will be negative consequences. Control of emotions is probably the biggest EI selling point for law enforcement. Loss of control of emotions is behind most embarrassing moments for agencies and time when LEOs/agencies get sued. Moving forward, agencies should develop more training where more emphasis is on emotional control under stress vs straight shoot/no-shoot scenarios.

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    Our agency doesn't present training specific to emotional intelligence, however we require all supervisors to partake in training that has the topic built-in. The problem is the benefits would be better served starting while you are younger in your career than later. The guys that are already supervisors have matured and learned (for the most part) to manage their emotions and read others better than the did when they started. To me the most important aspect of EI is specific to the individual officer and their health. Not learning to manage their emotions or having the self awareness can lead to lifelong issues. There were a tremendous number of police suicides in the US in 2019. If training in EI would have save just one, it would have been worth it.

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    Sergeant Kelly Lee

    The biggest take away from this section for me is the 7 steps to improving EI in Law Enforcement. In the world we live in today it is clear and evident that the "old way" of conducting our jobs or the way the "organization" is run outdated and behind times. It is my opinion that many organizations still run under the hierarchical system and most likely don't do enough to groom and grow the appropriate people for the jobs. More often than not people get promoted for the wrong reasons. By searching our those people who already have a high EI not necessarily a high IQ and allowing them to grow and giving them the tools they need to grow even more will only produce a better organization and place to work. A strong statement from the module was that people leave because of bad boss's not because of a bad organization. In doing some self-reflection I know my biggest area to focus on and improve on is emotional literacy. Many times over in both my personal and professional life I have said things I do not mean to say and wish that I could retract them and start over choosing better words to make my point.

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    Gregory Hutchins

    Of the many topics within the section, the most important lesson was the terminology of emotional hijacking. I am very familiar with the need to be versed in self-awareness and how you are often the center of your tests, trials, and tribulations. Keeping emotions in check was a challenge earlier in my career. Upon having a significant life changing event, only then did I see the effects anger and emotions were having on my career progression.
    To codify anger in the fashion presented was enlightening and an excellent presentation to keep in my resiliency toolbox. While I am known for not letting emotions openly affect me, as seen with the snake attack video, my interactions with superiors and peers were where I struggled. Anger can have a purpose, but as stated within the presentation, “anyone can be angry, but being angry with the right person, to the right degree at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way, that is not easy” (Robinson, 33:52-34:06).
    Through continually refining my understanding of this concept, I am better able to use the eight different uses of emotional intelligence with better success in the development of my leadership capabilities. I make better decisions while remaining highly motivated and positively committed to serving my organization, community, and subordinates. As I reviewed the material, I noticed how my emotions cause challenges to those in this profession. Still, as I enhanced my emotional literacy, I saw that I better manage hot buttons, interpersonal challenges, and I have increased my efficiency in my duties as outlined within section 11 of the presentation.

    Robinson, M. (2017). Practical emotional intelligence. Learning area 1, Module 3. National Command and Staff College.

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    Bou Gazley

    Emotional Intelligence is something that I had heard of, but did not truly understand. This session was very helpful in better understanding the concept. I especially took note during the interview when it was stated that emotional intelligence was twice as important to businesses than the IQ and technical skills combined. Yet, they are not truly taught... Also when listing the top skills managers are looking for in new hires, 6 out of 7 were based in emotional intelligence. This session has opened my eyes to the need to truly evaluate my EI and take steps to improve in this area.

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    It seems to be clear after this lesson that public safety receiving emotional intelligence training doesn't seem to be very common. Unfortunately, law enforcement officers seem to need it the most. With law enforcement having an extremely high burnout rate and lately seem to be very much so in the spotlight of the nation, officers being able to handle their emotions seems like it should certainly be a priority for departments. I've been in the situation where it has been evident that one of my co-workers is struggling from a call that they were on or I've been on calls where a co-worker is out of line because they let their emotions get out of control. Fortunately, my department is currently in the process of putting together a peer support team. I will be on that team, which I'm excited about because it is something that I am truly passionate about and hope to be able to help the people that I work with everyday. Seeing someone you work with decline at work and in their personal lives is tough to see, especially when it feels like there isn't a lot you can do about it. Emotional intelligence training needs to be come a new norm, and not be something that is brought up every once in awhile. It is something that needs to be trained and then frequently be refreshed with everyone.

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      Kari,
      Our office is in the infant stages of introducing a peer support group for our employees. Emotional intelligence is something that our employees need to be cognizant of, and learn more about.

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        Sgt. Shawn Wilson

        Lt,

        Peer to Peer is outstanding. We currently have a robust peer to peer program that has had great results. This program was developed at our agency by two of my mentors who have continued working on expanding the program to a full officer wellness routine which is still in its infancy. Training EI and offering the solid foundational support to nurture it is on us a leaders and I would like to see more implementation of EI training at the academy/entry level so once we get them, a solid foundation is in place and we don't get that look of, I don't know what you’re talking about.

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    Adam Kronstedt

    The idea behind emotional management stood out the most for me during this lecture. In my mind, this is something we don't spend nearly enough time with. This is also what gets us as leo's in trouble in the heat of the moment. Our emotions get triggered by whatever incident we are immersed in, and our actions can be driven negatively by those emotions. Self awareness, emotional management, effective communication, social awareness, and conflict resolution are all tied together. But to me, even if we can't identify what it is we are feeling, if we can't figure out how to quell a pile of chemicals our brain dumps on us during an incident, we likely will react adversely.

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      Travis Linskens

      That's a great point. I believe being able to identify our emotions is a half the battle the other half is how to respond to our emotions so we can maintain a level of professionalism that allows us to serve the public effectively.

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    Emotional intelligence is something that I never really thought about. When the instructor stated that between 80 and 85% of all officer complaints are due to how the officer made that individual feel, this is quite alarming. This I believe comes from officers inability to communicate effectively with people from our community. Possibly these officers are not comfortable in their new positions or with themselves as individuals. By becoming more cognizant of their emotional intelligence, this may help how they present themselves to our community members.

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      Matthew Menard

      I think your right on point here. I very often get complaints from citizens about how a deputy made them feel. When I dive into the complaint further I find that "technically" the deputy didn't do anything wrong or violate any policies, however they certainly could have handled the situation better or brought more empathy to the table.

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    Sgt. Shawn Wilson

    I am currently assigned to the Training Division within my agency of approximately 1200 personnel. In my current position I review all UoF incidents related to our Patrol and Investigative Division. Having reviewed numerous UoF incidents looking for patterns or other training deficiencies that need to be addressed; Emotional Intelligence (EI) stands out as being a solid foundation for incidents that went well and a faulty foundation where the incident could have been handled in a better manner supporting the data the instructor relayed regarding, 80-85% of all officer complaints were due to the how the officer made the individual feel. It could be just my data and unique to my agency, but younger less experienced officers are often lacking in EI. Finding this to be a deficiency, dynamic scenario-based training has been implemented to recreate the anxiety that can occur with the objective of continually increasing the level of EI in all personnel attending training.

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    Sergeant Michael Prachel

    The lecture opened my eyes to a concept I have not heard much about. I could not help but think of the numerous situations I have been involved in where emotions got the best of me or others I have worked with. Chief Deputy Mike Robinson’s techniques are a great baseline for Emotional Intelligence. To always be aware of your emotional status is crucial. In this profession, we may have good days and bad days. Many officers show up to their shift, often on little-to-no sleep, have personal problems that may be lingering, or have something on their mind from a previous shift. By knowing where their emotional status is may help them self-regulate and handle how they react to a situation. Learning to control emotional triggers may prevent a “knee jerk” reaction that could potentially cause an unnecessary use of force or escalating of an incident that was not needed. Knowing and understanding your “hot buttons” ahead of time will make you more aware of your emotions and allow you to control yourself. Utilizing the “10 second rule” is a technique that goes along with controlling your emotional triggers. Allowing time to think before you react can be used in your daily life, not just law enforcement. Taking a deep breath, allowing time to process information, and then acting will enhance your decision making. And finally, training your brain with repetition to be aware of Emotional Intelligence will build that conscious thought, allowing you to become a leader and to manage difficult decisions. Overall, this lecture was extremely beneficial and will help strive to become a better leader.

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      Sgt. Samantha Koscher

      I think what you said about learning to control emotional triggers is right on point! Knowing what your "hot buttons" are and coming up with some pre-planned, practiced responses to those "hot buttons" can help diffuse those situations, or at a minimum, not feed in to making the situation worse.

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    Matthew Menard

    The topic of EI seems to be something not often discussed when talking about becoming an effective leader, however it most definitely is an important one. I specifically found personal connection to the example used in the lecture of the manager who rules through use of their title but often does not have success in the long run. I think we've all had that manager who is in their position but is not effective because they don't know how to tailor the needs of each of their employees to make them successful. It seems to me two of the most often missing EI traits in bad managers are self-awareness and empathy; both of which can be detrimental to the success of any organization.

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      I think you make an extremely valid point in that effectiveness requires tailoring to a specific person or setting. Having control and exhibiting good emotional intelligence is only part of the interaction, in that, you must interpret the other person and adapt accordingly. Even if you have strong emotional intelligence but try to apply a one size fits all approach to others you are destined to fail.

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    I think this is critical to remember in the law enforcement profession as my ability to effectively lead and make emotional connections with those around me will require repetition and effectively interpreting the intangible, such as a person emotions or body language. It’s also important to realize that a portrayed emotion could have a wide variety of meanings, which complicates things even further and brings the whole concept full circle in that repetition is key. Knowing this and working on this skillset will help me interact with my co-workers, but also those I many interact with on the street. Having the ability to correctly interpret their emotions and personally exhibit a high emotional intelligence will be critical in dealing with the challenges that will be presented. Feeling the emotions is easy, controlling and responding with the correct emotions is not easy.

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    Travis Linskens

    I enjoyed listening to this lecture. It reminded me of how vital it is to always evaluate your emotional status. Like any job, in law enforcement, we have better days than others. Having the ability to regulate/monitor your status can better help where your reaction is coming from and help identify triggers earlier avoiding an unprofessional response.
    I find it interesting as a whole, law enforcement doesn't make much of an investment in emotional intelligence training when it is one of the most influential aspects that dictate the success of an officer/leader. Like many other LE skills, it only holds the value the receiver puts on it and their willingness to utilize it beyond the training. The only way we can improve together is, as leadership, we must practice what we preach and be the standard. We need to encourage others to do the same and hold those accountable that aren't willing to put forth the effort.

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    Timothy Sandlin

    My first thought upon completing this module on Emotional Intelligence of that I wish that I had completed this years ago. The emotional intelligence aspect of law enforcement work is one of those force multipliers if the officer as a high level of emotional intelligence. However, in dealing with some of the confrontational and extremely emotional situations often seen today it becomes clear when an officer doesn't possess a certain level of emotional intelligence to effectively negotiate some of the scenarios that we face. This module included 7 steps to improve emotional intelligence that I feel should certainly be offered to every officer frequently and reinforced throughout the year.

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      Ronald Smith

      Mr. Sandlin when I read your comment I thought of all those hard charging 21 to 25 year old new officers and the thrill of the job. It is awesome to be a police officer and at that age you still feel invincible. Our firearms instructors drive home when and how to use your weapons, our defensive tactics are taught for days with emotion and stories or scenarios where we are going to win the fight, oh sorry control the situation with only the reasonable amount of force necessary to affect the desirable outcome. Our recruits, trainees, or cadets are as excited as anyone can be to go forth and protect the world. Those young officers, sounds like you were one, hear and see the trainings, sign the forms they understand, but just do not have the life experience for the lessons of life. All that to say I agree the 7 steps to improve emotional intelligence should be frequently taught and reminded to help all of us continue to improve our emotional intelligence. 10 minutes of training each day times 16 days worked each month times 12 months in a year equals 32 hours a year of training. The seven steps could be covered well.

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    Sgt. Samantha Koscher

    While reviewing the material, I really enjoyed the video with Daniel Goleman. He made some very good points about how in our current education system, we focus on improving the technical skills of individuals, such as reading or math, while there is little emphasis on improving the emotional intelligence of individuals. In law enforcement, we spend alot of time training on how to go hands on with subjects, how to drive our vehicles safety, and how to use our firearm proficiently. Little time is spent talking about improving emotional intelligence or mentally preparing for handling stressful situations. I found the 7 steps to improving emotional intelligence to be very applicable and something that should be focused on more in training. The steps on knowing yourself and your "hot buttons" are very important in mentally preparing for situations.

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    Ronald Smith

    The continuing attack on law enforcement is an opportunity to learn and test the level of emotional intelligence, not only the chaos in the streets with protests and riots but primarily the everyday interaction with the citizenry. It is in evitable someone is going to challenge an officers authority or legitimacy by defying instructions or finding the emotional 'hot button' that leads an officer into an emotional mistake. Learning oneself and what triggers those mistakes is a good step to increasing emotional intelligence, learning to deflect the words and deciphering the true issue or problem by reading body language, facial clues, and an empathetic ear an officer can gain the trust and respect of a person having an issue the police were called to help with. The more an officer practices emotional intelligence the easier enforcing the law and helping citizens seems to be.

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    Major Willie Stewart

    After completing this section, it really reinforces what I believe is needed in Law Enforcement. I believe Emotional Intelligence training is definitely needed in our chosen field of employment to show and help our officers understand their emotions and the emotions of others. I believe we are public servants and should be held to higher standards for being in control of ourselves and managing any situations that we encounter. It is our responsibility to educate our officers to make them aware of their influence on the public and the perception of our different agencies.

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      Kaiana Knight

      I agree, this module was detailed and it gave us several lessons and even examples about EI. It also stressed that we should show more empathy.

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    Marshall Carmouche

    Excellent and informative module. Being able to control our emotions is crucial in communication. Being able to control our emotions is also crucial in de-escalating potentially volatile situations. Controlling emotions also, as mentioned in the video, builds respect amongst co-workers, subordinates and peers. Now more than ever law enforcement is being watched. Control of emotions will help law enforcement make sound decisions as opposed to irrational decisions.

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      Eric Sathers

      I completely agree that officers' control of their own emotions will directly lead to better decision-making. I feel it's just as important that officers can effectively and accurately identify others' emotions to better respond to the situation.

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      Kenneth Davis

      Marshall- Sage words, indeed. self-control has such wide ranging effects on not only we, as leaders, but also our newer team-members. Yes- we are watched by so many today and in so many ways...that is society's new microcosm and it has landed at our feet.

      Best and stay safe-

      Ken

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    Eric Sathers

    I find it fascinating that evidence appears to show that a decline in emotional intelligence has potentially led to a wide variety of social problems in society, such as increased violence, increased mental health disorders, and increased substance abuse. Within the field of law enforcement, it appears that problems are further complicated by hiring practices that ignore emotional intelligence and instead focus primarily on technical skills. It seems clear that a comprehensive society-wide shift needs to take place to give EQ equal regard to IQ; this will improve societal issues and law enforcement’s ability and resilience to respond to those issues.

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      Jared Paul

      Eric,

      You make a very good point that hiring with law enforcement needs to be shifted. As you stated I have seen a lot of agencies focus on the technical skills of their candidates. I believe that there are a lot of ways a department could evaluate a candidate's EQ through questions and scenarios. I agree that this type of shift in recruitment could bring a higher quality of officers to our departments.

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      Kenneth Davis

      Eric- I concur. I think we are witnessing this every day in our communities. However. It does not bode well for our profession if we are unable, as a profession, to get a handle on it in our own house. A surge in conceptualized learning in colleges and secondary schools has pushed EI to the forefront...and this is where the public expects us to be. Essentially, they are asking why we are not already there!

      I am in hopes that we can meet that expectation. The ship is turning, but it still takes a bit!

      Best to you and stay safe-

      Ken

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    Jared Paul

    Emotional intelligence, what a huge topic. I found it very interesting and there were a lot of great techniques covered on how to improve emotional intelligence. Something that stuck with me through the material was in the section on EI for law enforcement. Specifically, the reality is that citizens expect officers to have a high emotional intelligence. I have always believed that it important for an officer to be able to sympathize and empathize with individuals they contact through calls for service. The way the officer conducts themselves as well as the way they communicate can drastically impact the individual they are in contact with. Being able to show sympathy and empathy can go a long way especially when handling victims of crimes.

    Additionally, I agree that emotional intelligence is crucial in this line of work. For the example given in the module; an individual in custody spits on an officer. It is easy for the officer to became extremely angry and act out on those emotions. However, being able to control those emotions and know more appropriate ways to react can not only help in the situation it can save their career. I was very appreciative to learn techniques on how to train officers to be more emotionally intelligent. As mentioned by Daniel Goleman, training for emotional intelligence needs to be more focused on emotional training. Building a training that focuses on our officers’ emotions and how the react to situations, and to be repetitive in those trainings. This is what will enhance our officers ‘emotional intelligence.

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      Derek Champagne

      Most people who do not interact with law enforcement would be mordified by some of the things that suspects and people do and say to police on a daily basis. You have to be able to control those emotions because at times they are only trying to get you to react to their comments and actions because they are recording you. They want to show everyone the bad side of the officer, not the fight, spit or the abuse of words he just endured before the recording started.

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    Kaiana Knight

    Honestly, I wish I would have had time to finish this module yesterday morning instead of today. During the module they mentioned several steps to improve EI in law enforcement. One that stood out the most for me today was "Hot Buttons." The lesson encouraged us to be able to recognize our triggers ahead of time, which I do know my triggers but at times it's really hard when your caught off guard. On yesterday one of my co-workers made a huge mistake with an inmate insulin. I became so upset because she was just retrained on giving insulin, and yet she made the same mistake days later. I had to calm myself down before I even spoke to her about the error. She told me that she didn't know why she gave the incorrect amount of insulin. I informed her that i would speak with her about it later. So once she left, I walked outside and calmed myself by taking a walk around the building a few times. Exercise always help me relieve my stress and anxiety. About 20 mins later I was calm enough to speak with her more in depth concerning her error. I agree with the lesson that it helps to visualize a situation or a person before an event takes place. I think by doing that we would respond much better to bad situations that will take place. I've learned from this section most is that I need to practice my emotional responses, so I can adapt better to any environment I'm given.

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      Kaiana,
      You may have taken the course a day after your real-life scenario, but it sounds like you did a great job of cooling off before confronting your co-worker. What a difference it makes when you can approach others with a level head rather than a hot head. I'm sure that walk allowed you to approach the topic with a bit more compassion and rationality than an emotional blow up.

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      Scott Crawford

      Wonderful job of recognizing your "hot Buttons" , and what to do when things begin to go south. Glad to know you took the time to clear your head and calm down before speaking to her about such a serious subject. I tell my deputies in the jail, that there is only a couple of mistakes that can`t be fixed, and given someone the wrong medicine is one of them. I myself have to really take the time and process my thoughts before I speak. I, like many others have said things I`ve instantly regretted. Once we say the words, there is no getting them back.

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    Kenneth Davis

    The emergence of emotional intelligence (EI) in the law enforcement arena has transformed, and continues to transform, leadership theorem in a remarkable way (Robinson, 2021). In the environment that is so prevalent in the profession of late, it is important to master the skill sets associated with EI. Principally, the inclusion of the concept’s associated skillsets identified by Goleman, Boyatzis and Mckee (2013) set forth an acknowledged regimen of service in building the Magnus leader. The tenets of the EI concept include self-cognizance, self-restraint, emotionally insightful, inspired and possessing social skills.

    The self-cognizance tenet lauds the importance of one’s intuition and recognition of emotions in real time. This skill enables the leaders to recognize when feedback is being absorbed and when is the appropriate time to apply such. This is a central theme in EI and serves as the lynchpin for the process.
    The second principle to be considered is self-restraint. The ability to control one’s self in response to challenging situations is imperative. To do so is to engage in self-reflection that tempers a leader’s response to ensure just and equitable actions rooted in a calm demeanor. This essential allows the leader and feedback recipient to engage in communication with a level of trust and understanding.

    Thirdly, being emotionally insightful resonates with folks when they are receiving feedback that might improve their performance (Goleman, Boyatzis & McKee, 2013). Empathy has long been noted in leadership circles, albeit not always in line with the other EI tenets. Empathetic personalities tend act as a barometer and allows leaders to resonate with how a recipient is reacting. This is often noted via body language and voice intonation and facial expressions

    Inspiration shares an important role in the EI fundamentals as well. To be motivated is to be driven towards learning, honing and implementing skills that grow the other tenets of EI. Motivation provides the encouragement to forge ahead and to receive feedback congruently.

    Lastly, the ability to effectively interact has a great deal of dependence on the other skills of EI. Communication, coupled with empathy and self-cognition, forms the foundation of relationship building (Robinson, 2021). This as another key element of the EI concept. In essence they complement each other.

    References

    Goleman, D., Boyatzis, R.E., Mckee, A. (2013). Primal leadership: unleashing the power of emotional intelligence. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Review Press.

    Robinson, M. (2021). Practical emotional intelligence. Module 3, week 3. National Command and Staff College.

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    I’ve attended Strata Leadership training on Emotional Intelligence, am a De-Escalation Instructor, and a former Crisis Negotiator. I’ve learned all three are very similar. One cannot build rapport with co-workers or those in crisis or being dealt with on the street without a process of some sort. It does take the ability to be self-aware, aware of others via a display of empathy, showing motivation for a common goal, and managing one’s own emotions. A breakdown in any one area can lead to a breakdown in building trust and rapport.

    In law enforcement, a key component to solving issues is by managing self via awareness and being rational. When unaware of one’s self, it often leads to reactive communication. Reacting is unplanned, unprepared, and usually the most explosive. That can lead to others equally displaying an emotional response leading to unproductive communication. It is vital to understand emotional intelligence to bring about positive resolutions and discussions.

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      Paul Brignac III

      I have also noticed similarities in those three topics. I too teach a course on De-Escalation and I have found that students with higher EI tend to receive the training more easily. Often people react to how we act. In Law Enforcement the ability to relate to individuals, especially during a crisis, in critical. Continuing to find ways to increase EI will aid our communities and our departments as well.

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    Thomas Martin

    I had never heard of the "Peter Principle" before today, and unfortunately I have worked for a few agencies that applied it in the making of their supervisors. Officers were rude with the public, and with one another . There seemed to be almost a poison you could taste with these agencies, and many employees were satisfied in partaking. Incompetence was plentiful, and it never failed, the ones with the worst attitudes always moved up through the ranks. As I think back on these particular agencies, I can see now, that the tone was set at the top, and trickle down theory was allowed. It has no place in the corporate world, so why should it ever have any place in law enforcement?

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      Bradley Treuil

      I couldn't agree more. I left the law enforcement community for several years and had the experience of working in the trades in that time frame. Most of the shops I worked in did exactly this. It was as if a cancer was in the building killing the morale slowly every day. It made getting up to go to work the worst thing. I can say from self experience that it is a fact that people do not leave bad jobs they leave bad bosses.

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    Paul Brignac III

    In my opinion, EI can be more difficult to teach than things such as firearms, defensive tactics, etc.. The department I work for has had the best results by essentially using the role model method. We attempt to identify individuals with high EI, then utilize them as Field Training Officers. While there are certainly other methods and resources available, we have had a great deal of success by focusing on EI as one of the most important qualities of our FTO's.

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      Steve Mahoney

      I am happy to hear that your department does that. So many times departments just take the most senior person to be FTO's instead of the most qualified person. I think by having FTO's with a high EI it sets the officer in training up to succeed. I know in my department I believe we washed out some good candidates that were being trained by FTO's with low EI so that was trained into the new hire and they didn't make it. I am happy to say we have turned that around now and don't just make senior officers FTO's

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    Bradley Treuil

    I can clearly see where the importance of EI comes into play in law enforcement. One of the sheriff's I have worked for in the past and many of the other deputies and officers who have had a hand in training me to do this job have all told me that most of, if not all of the people I will contact in my day or night at work have just encountered me at the lowest part of their day or night and that I should be empathetic towards them. How would I want to be treated in that moment. The fact that one single employee can have a positive or negative effect on a company or agency because of a simple interaction is not a new concept but after this lesson it is defiantly something for me to pay more attention to.

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    Steve Mahoney

    I believe this module should be taught annually at police inservices for departments. It really makes you look and reflect on who you are as a person, co worker and leader. So many times in our careers our mouths and emotions have placed us in situations that are not good. We have also had to talk to or discipline officers that lashed out either verbally or physically because they didn't have the emotional intelligence to be able to handle the situation. We spend countless hours training tactics, firearms, and evoc to make sure an officer is well trained. It is surprising how little we training the officer mentally. This does not mean CCIT training but to actually train and assist officers with how to handle their emotions and stress in the proper way. I will be encouraging my department to include this training into our yearly inservices as this training is what could save the department time and money from officer involved complaints

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    This is the first I've heard of Emotional Intelligence. This module was very interesting and made me realize some of my short comings. I realized that I wore my emotions on my sleeve and tend to be reactive rather then proactive. Instead of listening and thinking before I speak or react; I would act out of haste / eagerness. After listening to these lectures and reading the literature; I realize I have a lot of work to do.

    I need to work on my emotional literacy, physical / mental cues, and hot buttons. In hind sight 20/20, I need to slow down and take everything in. I need to be more rational rather than irrational. I need to think more clearly about the other point of view; versus always attempting to challenge it. My previous actions was given individuals the wrong perception of me. They were mistaken my passion for anger or aggravation. If I want to be a good leader I have to use these tools to better manage and keep my emotions in order.

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      Lt. Zachary Roberts

      I can really appreciate the ability to understand how you have personally fell short of controlling and understanding your own emotional intelligence. I can respect how you mention you have previously wore your emotions on your sleeve and be more reactive than active. I myself can say I was the same way before developing a better understanding of emotional intelligence at a leadership training years ago. Being able to recognize what you need to work on will really help you develop yourself but also those around you that you lead.

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    Mr. Collins I totally agree with you. If this course can be implemented into academies; it will definitely help push out a better quality officer. So many of these millennials have the entitled mindset. They feel that the world owe them something and they have no respect for authority. This would expose them to positive reinforcement. They need to be taught how to evaluate their feelings and control their emotions.

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    Scott Crawford

    This lecture was the first time I had heard of the term Emotional Intelligence, but some of the concepts sounded familiar. Some of the points discussed began to sound like lessons that were taught to us as children. Learn to manage your emotions, empathy- put yourself in their shoes etc. Develop social skills that invite people to want to be around you. I believe that in today`s world of Law Enforcement, there is a greater need for this training. Departments should recognize people who have these kills and place them in positions to help others learn and grow as law enforcement officers

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    Derek Champagne

    This is the first time I have learned of the term emotional intelligence. As I look back over my notes taken from the lecture, I focus more on the circles of emotional intelligence. I find that when I am dealing with the public, mostly during investigations, I find myself finding common ground with them and I am able to build rapport. Most of the people we deal with I have had previous on-the-job encounters and they remember the way they were treated and this opens up the communication between us to reach the end goal. I often tell people when they say I’m doing too much that they can take whatever it is they want to form me, but they will never be able to take my motivation.

    In regards to “hot buttons”, I can name a few officers that work or have work for my Agency that could show up on the simplest call for service and turn it into a resisting officer call over the radio. One officer in particular that always escalated calls, recently responded to an assist officer call where a vehicle had crashed into a wooded area. When the original officer arrived on the scene, a 4 ft female was able to disarm the police officer during a struggle. The officer was able to gain control of his weapon at the same time additional units were arriving to assist. The “hot button” officer, who had responded, helped escort the suspect out of the woods. During the course of the escort, the female subject kicked the officer several times and at this point, he could not control his emotions. The officer, without hesitation, grabbed the female by the hair and literally threw her over a fence. The female then kicked the officer yet again and this is when he pulled her by her hair to the ground. This particular officer had a history of escalating people and suspects, but yet still continued to do so after being talked to several times. I do not believe this officer was ever given formal training on this topic and this incident ended up being his last. A few days later he was charged with a criminal offense and fired from our Agency.

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    Lt. Zachary Roberts

    The most important thing I learned from this topic, is the importance of having emotional intelligence as well as being able to understand others level of emotional intelligence. With the climate of law enforcement being where it is today, I believe emotional intelligence should be at the to of the list of things department's train on. Having officers be able to recognize and control their emotions while on duty and off duty will help them better succeed in their careers. I have seen many times where officers lose it on a call because they do not know how to control their emotions. Officers end up loosing their jobs, careers, homes and other personal things because they lost control of their emotions. I have also seen officers get hurt because they are unable to read the emotions of others and understand how others are feeling. This lecture really brings to point the importance of emotional intelligence, both possessing it and being able to understand it.