Command and Staff Program

Leadership in Practice: Servant Leadership

Replies
361
Voices
189
Dr. Mitch Javidi
Instructions:  
  1. Post a new discussion related to the topics covered in this module.  Your post needs to provide specific lessons learned with examples from this module helping you enhance your leadership capacity at work.
  2. After posting your discussion, review posts provided by other students in the class and reply to at least one of them. 
  • Kyle Turner

    The concept of servant leadership is contrary to our typical world view of leadership. How do you lead as a servant? However, I think most of us have seen it happen. Where somebody with authority, who can order people to do their will, instead chooses not to, and thinks of whats best for others or works hard to make others around them successful. That a person in power would care so much about those below them in the chain, is so contrary to human nature, making servant leadership suspect to those who have never tried it. But to me it is the epitome of true leadership. Leading is doing what's best for the organization and those around you. What's best for the organization is to make those around you better. To do so often requires intervention. And who better to intervene than those with authority.

    • Monte Potier

      It definitely takes a special leader to have the ability to put the needs of others before himself. This takes great patience, something I need to work on.

      • Jarvis Mayfield

        I agree to be a great servant leader you have to put your wants or needs aside to help others. Just like when the pitcher allowed Shay to hit the ball knowing that would cause his team to lose the game. The pitcher displayed great leadership.

      • Miranda Rogers

        I think that we can adapt to becoming a servant leader as long as we continue to remind ourselves how valuable those that we lead are.

    • Eduardo Palomares

      Kyle,

      Excellent point on servant leadership. The servant leader challenges the status quo of what is viewed as typical leadership where as a general practice, "leaders" give orders and make people work for them. It is important to point out that as leaders we work for our people and our objective should be to develop them. This will strengthen the leader's skills and those around them. I really don't see servant leadership as a sign of weakness but as a sign of strength. When we serve others we put them on the front seat and help them achieve their goals.

      • Sgt. Shawn Wilson

        Reviewing the above comments regarding the status quo of what is viewed as typical leadership I believe is very objective and viewed through the lens of the writer. I have never believed that the norm for leadership is to just give orders and make people work for them. A leader is not a leader due to their rank but due to their actions and words and always places their people before them while facilitating their advancement.

      • Curtis Summerlin

        The point about as leaders we work for our people is absolutely true! Our goal should always be to look out for their best interest and help them become better. The better they do, the better we are.

    • I really agree with your thought on how a person with authority doesn't normally care very much about people that are underneath them or that follow them. I feel like that is a very old way of doing things. My agency has drastically improved in that area and now most of administration respects the opinions and ideas of other and wants feedback and input. That creates a more positive work culture overall.

    • Jack Gilboy

      Out of all the different types of leaders, a "servant leader" is the most selfless. It builds stronger relationships and builds a stronger following. It takes a strong person to be a servant leader.

    • Denise Boudreaux

      To be a servant leader? This would be probably the kindest highest honor someone could say about me. To be able to lead as a servant. To put the needs of others before your own and to work hard to have those around you succeed is to be a true leader.

  • Monte Potier

    I believe that good leaders all practice forms of a "servant leadership". They have both strengths and weaknesses of the characteristics mentioned. It takes great leaders to self-reflect and work on the ones that they are weak in for the betterment of the organization.

    • Frank Acuna

      Monte, I too believe Servant Leadership has its strengths and challenges. Self-reflection is one of the most challenging tasks to undertake for anyone, and especially a leader who is expected to have all the answers.

      Frank

    • Jarod Primicerio

      Agree Monte. There are components of servant leadership that we are innately good at and other areas that need some attention. Having the willingness to listen, learn and grow will help us as leaders.

    • Lt. Mark Lyons

      I agree. I believe that good leaders all possess various qualities and characteristics of a servant leader. The concept of "working to see others succeed" is one that I regularly discuss and promote with our supervisors.

  • Frank Acuna

    Servant Leadership is a leadership theory that focuses on developing others and sacrificing for the greater good. Leaders who practice servitude are focused on building relationships, recognizing the good work of others, caring, listening and being empathetic with the adversity faced by others. A true servant leader recognizes that by serving others, you build strong relationships, increase other's success and in turn, build a more successful and functional team. There is a strong balancing act that must occur in order for this leadership theory to be effective. The leader must still lead, provide direction and hold their employees accountable while empowering them and accepting their faults and failures.

    Frank

    • Brian Johnson

      Frank, very well said. As leaders, we have a responsibility to develop future leaders within our departments. The only way to do this is to provide them with a learning atmosphere and to help mentor them in their leadership development process. It sounds like you are doing just that. Brian

      • Paul Brignac III

        I agree that as senior leaders we must focus on the next generation of leaders. Typically by the time we have achieved a level of competence that allows us to be placed in leadership positions, we are approaching retirement. If the future and longevity of our departments is important to us, we must take the time to help develop our replacements.

    • Frank that was very well said. Servant leadership is what I feel in essence the world should follow. Sacrificing for the greater good of man kind. If more people practiced this, we would be in a better place.

  • Brian Johnson

    I believe everyone that wants to lead others needs to find in their own heart why they want to lead people. Leadership has nothing to do with rank or title, both are simply positions that give you a certain amount of power over others. The ability to understand that servant leaders develop others to help fulfill the mission is really why most leaders in law enforcement take on leadership roles, in my opinion. Remember, a servant leader still takes action, makes decisions, is responsible, and holds people accountable. It is just done with a caring and loving spirit. The biggest take away for those wanting to develop their servant leadership style is to empower and trust their people. We should allow decisions to be made at the lowest level and support those decisions. If it turns out to not be the best decision, it turns into an incredible learning experience for all involved. We have implemented the continuous improvement group (CIG) for that specific purpose. It has only been a year and we are still learning and growing through that process.

    • Chris Corbin

      Brain, the very first sentence in your post embodies Sinek's 'start with why' philosophy. If in evaluating our 'why' for wanting to lead others, we find that it is out of alignment with the foundational principles of servant leadership, we must realize that we are not on the best path to success. That's not to say that we won't be successful, but in my opinion, we and our teams will undoubtedly be less successful and will endure far more stress and frustration along the way than we would if we simply embodied the servant leadership approach.

    • Nancy Franklin

      Brian, I agree that leadership has nothing to do with rank or title like you mentioned. People follow because they respect the person, not the position. I think it is important as you mentioned to look at servant leadership from a different lens - one that puts others first.

  • Chris Corbin

    One potential benefit of the servant leadership approach that I did not see mentioned in the lecture is the positive impact that servant leadership has on an organization's succession planning efforts. By investing in our people through the extension of mentoring, trust and opportunity, we help them to grow, which in turn prepares them for the added responsibilities that come with promotion. I have seen this in our department where many of our leaders, using the servant leadership approach, have worked to develop the members of their teams. The positive impacts of these efforts are seen each and every time we undertake the promotional process, as we have almost always have several very strong candidates for each position.

  • Jarod Primicerio

    Servant leadership is an area I have truly been focusing on over the past two years. Listening to fully understand the other person is a component that I definitely needed to focus on. Always battling a lack of time in the day, I seemed to want to get to the point quickly and resolve the issue. Spending some time with the employee, listening thoroughly, with empathy and compassion, I have greatly enhanced the relationships with my team.

    • Dan Wolff

      Jarod Primicerio,
      With one of the characteristics defined as withdrawal (or as Lt. Col Spain called it “pausing”) is determining what can wait and what is urgent. Giving the team a chance to give input on what the issue is and a resolution is something I think we can all improve on. Even on the strategies to include #5 of delegating, educating and inspiring will take me a long way if I would practice them more.
      Dan

      • Joey Prevost

        I think that deciding what issue has more importance is definitely a skill I need improvement in. Sometimes it is just difficult to prioritize when everything is coming at you at once and everyone is screaming for it to be down "right now".

        • Travis Linskens

          Joey,

          I think everyone can continuously get better in this area, so you're not a lone. It makes it challenging, especially for middle management, when your priorities could be different from those above you.

    • mtroscla@tulane.edu

      When I think back over the years, how many times have i just listened to respond and not to understand, how many messages have I missed?

      • Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

        Well said, I am also guilty of listening to respond and not understand. More effective listening will help with becoming a servant leader

    • Michael McLain

      Jarod I agree. I thing regardless on which time of leader we chose to be. The ability to listen to and understand our team in extremely important to build a successful team.

  • Dan Wolff

    As we change in our practices in today’s law enforcement and deal with many diverse cultures (especially millennials) a servant leader fits better with the young deputies I lead. But, I don’t want to come across as me just doing my job. They have to know I am truly interested in them and have a true interest in their path to success. When making changes or decisions I try to get them involved in the process to show they have a say and our team is not a totalitarian style of change process. Using the nine characteristics and 7 strategies will definitely assist in reaching my goal of becoming more of a servant leader but still maintaining a balance when I need to.

    • Brent Olson

      Dan,

      I do the same! I try to involve my team in whatever changes I can. If I can't involve them in the change (i.e. it was passed down from command), I try to involve them in how it gets implemented. This can be very difficult in our profession as there are many changes that we can't control or aren't aware of until they get changed.

  • Joey Prevost

    Being a leader is a responsibility to others. The Servant Leader should be more concerned with those below them than those above them. If you show that you care for those under you, they will go to great lengths for you. I liked that the lecture covered this does not mean you have to be all "warm and fuzzy" all the time. The nine strategies are a good guide to start with.

    • Jason Porter

      You are right, having that concern for those around you is crucial in leading people. If they know you care about them and what is going on in their life rather than just what they are doing at work that day. They will follow you and emulate your actions.

    • Lance Leblanc

      Joey, I only met one leader that I felt was a servant leader all the time. You actually worked for him years ago. I will leave his initial instead of naming him. (TV) He would drive the worst vehicle in the fleet and wouldn't take a newer one until all his subordinates had newer vehicles.

  • Jason Porter

    The module discusses servant leaders. I can see where having this trait in your leadership style will help you become a better leader. Being emphatic and listening first rather than offering a solution to a problem before you have all the facts can go a long way in building trust and integrity with your staff.

    • Chasity Arwood

      I agree with you, this type of leadership style will help you become a better leader and put employees first.

    • Laurie Mecum

      I agree Jason. Having the respect of your staff and those around you goes a long way with your credibility.

  • Mike Brown

    Servant leaders possess the insight to see and understand what it takes to get the mission done. If this means getting your hands dirty along side the next person. Being a servant leader is a choice and not everyone understand that you have to step down in order to help others move up.

    • Drauzin Kinler

      Mike, your statement is true; we must occasionally get our hands dirty to understand what is really occurring in the organization. So often, we forget about the challenges that come along with the job because we no longer perform the same task as our subordinates.

    • Judith Estorge

      Mike, what an excellent last sentence! Servant leadership is such an important act of empathy. The art of listening first is difficult for many of us.

  • Nancy Franklin

    Servant leadership is key to ensuring that we remain people focused. In this lecture, the instructor briefly mentions the changes that social media have driven into the manner in which our youth especially communicate and relate to the world around them. Servant leadership is more important now than ever before, especially as these newer generations of individuals enter the workplace - our workplace of law enforcement. It is important more now than ever to ensure the face-to-face and interpersonal relationships that servant leadership require. Servant leaders demonstrate the ability to display empathy and compassion to others in a manner that gives them value and empowers others to be their best.

    • Brian Lewis

      I agree, unless we consciously make an effort to embrace servant leadership, it will be lost on the tech generation.

  • Drauzin Kinler

    I believe that the most significant role of a Servant Leader is to impact others so that they desire to mimic your positive behavior and Servant Leadership style. In return, it is hoped that those leaders leave a lasting impression on their subordinates and the generations to come. Based on the information learned in the module about Servant Leadership, this is the leader that ultimately gets the job done. This Servant Leadership has figured out how to lead using the correct methods needed to get the majority of subordinates on board and to buy in. The Servant Leadership style is an area of leadership that I plan on trying to grow not only in my leadership style but in the style of my subordinates as well.

    • Deana Hinton

      Drauzin, I agree with your point. The ability to inspire others to mimic your positive behavior is important. As your behavior is mimicked by more and more the organization gravitates to servitude. Change and growth becomes easier as most are working cooperative together. This is largely due to the fact the servant leadership has the biproduct of trust and with trust much can be accomplished.

  • Lance Leblanc

    Servant leaders have a natural inclination of servitude and empower others towards a common goal. They are always putting their employees first. I truly one met a few leaders like this in my career. One, in particular, I can think of, his employees loved him and would have ran through a brick wall for him.

    • David Cupit

      I agree with your comments Lance. A true servant leader will empower others and put their employees first.

  • Chasity Arwood

    The servant leader is described as one that focuses on teamwork and interpersonal relationships. This type of leader cares about their employees and is able to gain their trust and respect.

  • Brian Lewis

    Nothing is more impactful than servant leadership. When the front line officer sees their leader getting their hands dirty to help out, not for their own glory, but for the betterment of the team, it inspires others to do the same.

    • David Ehrmann

      I couldn’t agree more. There is nothing like watching your boss get in the trenches with you. It develops respect and comradery between the leader and their followers.

    • ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

      I couldn't agree more. There is nothing better than to know you are all in it together.

    • clouatre_kj@jpso.com

      This is absolutely true, Brian! I just don't think there is any better way to motivate your team and earn their respect than by working side by side with them.

    • Samantha Reps

      Agreed, watching leaders remembering where they came from is always a great experience to witness. Staff seems to have a whole new sense towards that leader afterwards.

    • Justin Payer

      Brain, I agree. When people know that their leader truly cares and is willing to do what is necessary for the betterment of everyone, it boosts morale and makes everyone work harder.

    • Kaiana Knight

      I totally agree Brian. When I see leaders working front line it inspires me to work harder and be better. Often times leaders forget where they started and refuse to work the front line.

    • Elliot Grace

      I agree with you Brian! I’ve been privileged to have worked up under the command of servant leaders and there’s nothing more inspiring than having the leader assist you with might be considered to be an entry level dirty or unpopular job.

  • David Cupit

    A true servant leader see others at their best, they have faith, trust and belief in their employees. The leader will model the way for their employees to follow. The servant leader will bring energy and enthusiasm to the team. They will empower others and help the team understand their potential.

    • chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

      I totally agree, I especially loved the part that before coming a servant leader, we must be servants ourselves first. That is a very valuable lesson and part in becoming a servant leader.

  • Judith Estorge

    Servant leaders are a special breed. It is incumbent upon all of us to find this level of servitude towards our fellow leaders and subordinates. Of the 9 characteristics discussed I most liked imagination and using brainstorming techniques. Imagination being vision on steroids is a goal to pursue.

  • Laurie Mecum

    Servant leader is a leader that fosters the mentoring of people and wants to leave his or her legacy behind. They are not a selfish person and wants to promote the overall goodness for the organization as well as the people. This is a behavior everyone should strive for in leadership.

    • Clint Patterson

      Laurie, I couldn’t agree more. I think sometimes leaders get motivated to make themselves look good at time and fail to realize they could have shared the spotlight with their subordinates.

    • dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

      I couldn't agree with you more, Laurie. I think that if more people embodied this type of leadership, many of the conflicts we see in the organization would be resolved much more quickly.

  • Clint Patterson

    Servant leadership ultimately starts with an unselfish mindset. If we have selfish motivations when we cannot become a good servant leader. Establishing the workplace culture in which servant leadership can thrive must be developed within our agencies. When there is genuine authenticity of putting others before ourselves, this type of behavior and skill will drive the culture in the right direction. We need to use this as a personal mission to influence others around us to rise to their full potential or calling. I feel the servant leader possesses the needs to become a great leader which can translate to organizational success.

    • Roanne Sampson

      The information in this lesson was very informative. I like the "leaders eat last" concept as well.

    • Christian Johnson

      I completely agree, Clint.

      If everyone truly cares about those around them and the success of the organization, more than themselves, then everyone and the organization thrives.

    • Lance Landry

      I like that view. Unselfishness is the key. We all have to learn to put other first, not only in work but in our personal lives as well. How different would the world be if everyone brandished the characters of an servant leader.

  • Roanne Sampson

    Simone Sinek comparison to leaders being like a parent concept was informative. I never looked at it in that aspect. Leaders put their followers first. Servant leaders are also servants themselves and empower other people. Servant leaders listen, help others dream, need to know how to pause, and understand empathy. Servant leaders build their legacy and are visual people. The majority of my time is spent creating beneficial programs for the community. It is very rewarding and I am very appreciative for being able to serve my agency in this manner.

    • Rocco Dominic, III

      You are a servant Leader, You are helping guide the youth of our parish. The youth that some have deemed uncontrollable or misbehaved. Your legacy will be known for helping our youth grow and prosper. showing them there is more to life than the environment they know.

    • dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

      Roanne you do a great job and it's absolutely servant leadership for what you do when you get out there and find all of these new programs and benefits for the youth of our community. I always say when listening to you in the Monday meetings, Ro is out there finding work for her division to be productive.

  • Amanda Pertuis

    Servant Leadership - not about where it takes you, it's where it takes us. This is powerful to me. I've known many servant leaders and they've helped to shape me in to the leader I am today. This was an interesting module.

  • David Ehrmann

    Listening to the lecture, specifically at the part regarding how leaders always eat last, made me think of my time in the Marine Corps. This concept was instilled in every Marine the day they arrived at boot camp. When Marine recruits line up at the chow hall, drill instructors inform them to line up in order with squad members first, then squad leaders, and finally, the guide who is the Marine recruit who oversees the platoon. That continued during my time in the Marine Corps, where lowest rank always ate first, not just enlisted then officer.

    • Donnie

      From the time I entered the Army to the time I retired I always observed my leaders eating last. I absolutely adopted the “Troops First, Mission Always” concept. As leaders we were always the first ones up and the last ones down. I found that it was rewarding when any soldier from my troop would make sure I got fed too. This made me realize the impact leaders leave on their subordinates.

  • Christian Johnson

    We are seeing a pattern in the various leadership methods... you have to truly care about others.

    Who would have thought that would be the key?

    I preach this constantly to all levels ha-ha. When I took the time to truly know my personnel and care for them and their families, productivity and cohesiveness blew through the roof.

    If you can have that, then add putting the organization before yourself, you have achieved servant leadership.

    In my experience, caring about my people and Agency more than myself has propelled me forward. Interesting side-effect don't you think?

  • Rocco Dominic, III

    I enjoyed this module. It is one that I kind live and lead by. I believe as leader we should invest in out people by providing them with adequate training, equipment, and most importantly knowledge. This knowledge can only be gained through meaningful communication and motivation.

  • Royce Starring

    I understand the theory of the servant leadership concept, However, I do not think this leadership still will work for everyone in a leadership roll. Most leaders frown at the ideal of being servant is beneath them.

  • Donnie

    Being a servant leader is almost automatic upon becoming a law enforcement officer. Even an entry level officer or deputy serves their public and community and may not even realize it. In critical situations, citizens look to even the lowest ranking LEO for answers. This automatically puts them in a leadership role and a serving role. To be a Servant Leader is to understand the qualities that define them and have compassion for those around you.

    • McKinney

      I agree that in law enforcement, we automatically take on a servitude role with our community partners. We, as leaders, need to take on this approach with our organizational members when they have valuable input that can meet a mission with success or if they have a way of improving things. Every investment is a necessity, especially with our team members, and we, as leaders, must be confident in our position, especially is a servant leadership role.

  • Lance Landry

    Some of the concepts outlined in this module for Authentic Leadership were very similar to a philosophy I have used for quite some times. In law enforcement in particular, it serves us well to treat others how we would expect law enforcement to treat one of our family members, until they dictate otherwise. With the recent changes in perception of law enforcement by society, this module is far more important today than ever.

    • Burke

      Absolutely, we live in a world that admonishes law enforcement constantly. Every action we take is put to constant questioning, either on the news or some other social media platform. Having a servant leadership mindset helps bond our community with our agency.

  • McKinney

    Servant Leadership has taken on a new idea with me. I enjoyed every aspect of the lesson, and Shay’s story allowed me to reflect for a moment. What am I doing to help others? When we take on servitude with our organizational members, it builds a relationship, empowerment and strengthens the goals that we are working towards. Strategy 1 (Adopt early or Now) sends a strong message that we need to consider for ourselves and to incorporate with members to ensure that we all are going to leave a legacy for the future generations.

    • Lieutenant John Champagne

      I agree Shay's story was touching and showed that even kids could recognize the power of putting others interest ahead of your own.

    • Major Stacy Fortenberry

      Caring about others, especially those who you are responsible for, is paramount in ethical leadership. We succeed when our people succeed. What better legacy to leave than one of coach, mentor, teacher.

  • Burke

    Servant leadership is key to bonding our agency with our community. Nowadays, we live in a world that is far more critical on law enforcement than ever before. Having this attitude is contagious within a department. With your people caring about others it will soften the community to your agency.

    • jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

      Servant leadership should be an area where every law enforcement officer is serving others, especially those in the community. When I was a patrol supervisor, I would always stress to my troops to treat everyone fairly and with dignity. You can still accomplish the mission at the time treat everyone like you would want to be treated in that situation. Servant leadership is kinda parallel to having the skill of advanced empathy.

      • The ability to inspire or cultivate empathy is a powerful skill. Too often using authority or coercion are used as a short-cut. However if we can tap into empathy the long-term benefits can be amazing. I always treated others like human beings. I once found myself in a project with no portable radio about to go hands on with a suspect. A second suspect came from behind a building. I thought I was about to be outnumbered. Instead the second person yelled to the first and told him not to resist that I would treat him right. The first person did as he was told and submitted to my arrest. I have no idea who the second person was, but my fair treatment of others saved me that day.

  • jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

    The Servant Leadership module was gave great insight for what it means to be a servant leader. I hope in my leadership role, I am showing the characteristics described by Lt. Col Spain. When she explained that Robert Greenleaf said "Some who have not studied servant leadership are themselves practicing servant leadership", I believe this is a true statement. For me it kinda goes back to the golden rule, treat others the way you yourself would want to be treated.

  • Lieutenant John Champagne

    As a public servant in law enforcement, you already have some servant leadership qualities. When we serve our subordinates and put their interest before ours, we show them we are not above anyone we lead. They will see this and hopefully incorporate it into their leadership style moving forward.

    • cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

      I agree. Law enforcement officers already have some servant qualities. Most people choose the law enforcement profession because they want to help and serve others.

  • Servant Leadership is one of the purest forms of service. Some people strive for leadership because they believe in a vision or want or want to focus on leaving a legacy. While servant leadership can incorporate those qualities it is in my opinion a purer form of leadership because it comes from the heart. Servant leaders don't rely on power bases of authority or coercion. Their referent power and ability to empower through persuasion gives them a loyal team dynamic.

  • Major Stacy Fortenberry

    To be a true leader one must inspire trust in those he will lead. How better to inspire trust than to have at your core the mentality that you have others well being as your first priority. You build others up to succeed rather than being self centered and promoting yourself.

    • guttuso_fa@jpso.com

      Just think of how much better an organization would be if everyone had this mentality. Instead of going behind other backs and quietly trying to sabotage others for their own self promotion. It would be wonderful to work with a group of people who only wanted what was best for the group and organization and worked towards that goal.

    • cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

      Major:
      Well said! Making others your first priority and placing your faith in them definitely inspires trust.

    • Marshall Carmouche

      That is so true. Being a servant to other people also shows compassion, hence building great relationships not only in an agency but also in the community.

  • cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

    As we learned in the module, servant leaders are highly alert and open to new opportunities. They are also able to see the big picture and how it made people around them feel. The kids in Shay’s story were able to see the big picture and how their decision to let a kid with special needs play affected everyone at the game. This story illustrated what it means to be a servant leader.

    • anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

      I agree being a servant leader is a powerful tool within organizations and in personal life issues.

  • mtroscla@tulane.edu

    The hardest part about practicing servant leadership is to overcome the natural human desire to be dominate, and to be able to demonstrate that taking a step back is not the same as retreating.

    • Henry Dominguez

      So true, Its understanding that Servant Leadership has nothing to do with being weak but in turns shows confidence and strength.

      • wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

        I agree. Not to be mistaken as weak or soft, because a servant leader, is one that can be identified as strong, disciplined and goal oriented.

    • sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

      I agree especially in Law Enforcement. We're public servants, but must also convey strength and authority, but finding that balance to act as a servant with compassion. Yea the 9 Steps one being withdrawal, definitely wanted clarification on that one. Learning about being able to step back.

  • chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

    In the learning area 3, module 4, learning about servant leaders was a great eye opener knowing and learning that they bring a substantial amount of energy to the table and create confidence. Knowing the servant leader strives for and encourage others to work toward balance physically and mentally for the organization and mentally.

  • michael-beck@lpso.net

    I believe Simon Sinek summed up the entirety of this module by saying we as supervisor are like parents and those who work under our command like our children. It should always be the hope of a parent that their child reaches their goals and aspirations and it behooves us to make certain we give them the knowledge and ability to do so. I have never seen a parent hope that their does not succeed in life and is better than them; it may happen, but I have not witnessed it. We as leaders need to remember that. In order to become servant leaders, we must put the needs of our men and women first. We need to make certain that they have the skills, knowledge, training, practical experience, and goals of their own in order to grow and surpass us.

  • Henry Dominguez

    I find it truly amazing how Servant Leadership goes such a long way. The thought of building those around you and empowering them can give you a much greater success as a team/organization than you can accomplish individually.

  • guttuso_fa@jpso.com

    I like the idea of constantly asking myself, how can I use myself to serve best? Our job is all about service, but I believe that sometime the fact gets lost that we are not just serving the public but we should also be serving those that we lead. Today's world moves at such a fast pace that we forget to slow down, like the instructor says, it is a marathon, not a sprint.

  • I started the study of Servant Leadership this year with the emerging leader's course. With that course, I was intrigued by the amount of power that a Servant Leader can do for the rest of his team.

    Servant Leadership is something that we can all practice, and it is easier for a newer leader to start with this leadership approach. This takes time to practice and master, however once done, it can be a game-changer in the agency.

    • Adam Gonzalez

      I to studied the Command and Staff College's Emerging Leader's Program. I completed this course last year and remember, like you, the servant leadership style that we learned about. I am not sure if I had ever heard of it before, yet it is something that I have long subscribed to and believed in. Who doesn't want a servant-style leader for their supervisor? Servant leadership is about sharing and sharing equates to caring...caring enough to invest in others the most limited resource we each are temporarily provided which is time. Thank you for your post.

  • sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

    I also like Simon Sineks ideas on Leadership, especially how he put our people are like our children. Its the job of parents to give their children the tools to succeed. As leaders our roles are no different. We want our people to succeed and hopefully replace us one day. Its our jobs to train the next group of leaders.

    • cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

      The idea of the next leaders we are training as being our kids is a good one. We will give everything for our children and do whatever we need to do for them to succeed. The true definition of servant hood.

  • ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

    Everyone is a servant leader in some form or another. I think most of us need to maybe a try a little harder and expand on these virtues. Nothing makes a bigger difference with your team than when they know you have their back and are willing to do what it takes to help them succeed.

    • dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

      You are exactly right. Your people will have more confidence to do their jobs knowing trust exists.

    • I believe we get so consumed in our duties that we often forget why we "signed up" to begin with. Being able to help people, combat things that ill society, make contributions to society, and be leaders in and out of our respective communities. We need to slow down sometimes and recognize who we ultimately want to be.

  • cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

    A servant leader is a strong way to be a leader and give everything to the people that serve under us that they need to succeed. It may be looked at as a weak way to lead but it is not easy to always provide, give, teach, and move aside to let others learn how to lead.

  • cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

    A servant leader is a strong way to be a leader and give everything to the people that serve under us that they need to succeed. It may be looked at as a weak way to lead but it is not easy to always provide, give, teach, and move aside to let others learn how to lead. A servant leader has to be willing to look at the greater good of the entire organization.

    • Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

      I agree that we as leaders know how to do certain things and sometimes it is extremely hard to step aside and allow others to give it there best. Even if they may fail we can use this to allow them to reach levels they would not have been able to attain if the opportunity was not offered and we completed the task ourselves.

  • dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

    There is no better sense of accomplishment than having the people under your command trust you and follow you while you merely listen to their needs and empower them to succeed. And when they do, you make sure they get all the credit. Respect is earned here.

  • Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

    This style of leadership is one that I have not known the formal name of, but have witnessed and also utilized throughout my leadership journey to some degree. I think it is a great style of leadership that many others in our agency can practice and implement with the strategies outlined. I especially paid attention when Lt. Col. Spain told us to teach, mentor, coach, and train your team...I make a conscious effort when giving instructions to lead my subordinates to the desired outcome without forcing authority onto them.

    • steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

      Agree we should not force anything on them but to lead them to the right direction. Let them take the correct path if they want it.

    • Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

      Yes… I thoroughly enjoy watching my team flourish when they succeed individually or as a team. We sit down, express our goals to one another and assist each other any way we can. One small success makes everyone feel great and motivated to tackle the next goal.

  • anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

    This lecture gave good insight on servant leadership. I feel that we all, as leaders, display servant leadership. We find ourselves, at times, putting the issues and concerns of our followers before our own.

    • Anthony, that Is something that people have always done. A mutual friend of ours, that is no longer with us, always helped others before himself. It is interesting that when I watch this module, one of my thoughts was how that friend always went out of his way to help his fellow officers.

  • dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

    I think there are some characteristics of a servant leader that I do often and well and there are others I can definitely improve on. I am always trying to get the best tools and equipment for my team to do the job. Whether it's the best training, newest gadget or program to help them succeed, we will try and make it happen. I could probably work on my listening skills, being more attentive, and also as I have mentioned before, my empathy skills.

    • blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree, I also need more work on the listening skills. We as a department are always trying to get the best equipment and training for our people to allow them to succeed. That is one great thing about our department; training is always a top priority.

  • blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

    Servant Leadership is the style of Leadership that I strive for every day. I love to see my officers succeed and accomplish their goals. I try to give my officers all the knowledge and support that I have for them to succeed. I still need improvement in the listening category. I tend to react first instead of listening first. I am more conscious about this, and now I stop and take a deep breath and process before speaking.

    • Beau, becoming a leader of a specialized unit will definitely show you where being a servant leader pays off. It also helps you practice the listen first and speak last skill set, because to ensure the success of our followers me must first understand what troubles they are having so we can ensure their success.

  • steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

    It is very difficult to see someone that is a selfish person as a servant leader. When you see someone not care about others remember to yourself, they will not become a servant leader in the future. It is wise to involve yourself in charitable and voluntary organizations to help practice the servant leadership way of life. No matter what we accomplish in the professional life, this type of leadership will be rewarding for the personal life. Bottom line, we just do what is right for the right reason.

  • cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

    Being a servant leader seems to us as public servants. My definition we are here to serve the community. It can be easy to get caught up in the day-to-day tasks and lose touch with the relationships around us.

    In this day and age, us focusing on our interpersonal relations can help us bridge the gap and work towards healing our relationship with the community.

  • in this module, I was reminded that a servant leader focuses on the relationships of all, not just the bosses. To often, leaders put most of their energy on building relationship with their supervisor instead of focusing relationships with subordinates.

    To develop myself as a servant leader, I will reach out o more people to expand my influence. I will come out of my comfort zone and get more involved in the organization and community.

  • clouatre_kj@jpso.com

    This is a very important topic. Inspiring and motivating everyone you is the role of a leader. A servant leader makes that happen naturally. I have seen how a servant leader can make all the difference in the world to their team. The ream responds better and is essentially more successful. I also liked the idea of serving up and down the chain of command. Many leaders forget about the team that got them there.

  • dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

    I learned a great lesson in this module. I can understand how servant leadership can be viewed as being "warm and fuzzy." However; servant leadership can build a lasting legacy for a leader willing to use it.

  • Adam Gonzalez

    Incredibly touched by the true story that the instructor shared. Of all the pauses that have taken place for me throughout this wonderful and meaningful session, I haven't been touched like this until now. What amazing humanity! What important lessons to be learned! Towards the end of this module, the statement was made that "Servant leaders make dreams happen". I took note of this and added my own addition. I added to this statement that Servant leaders make dreams happen...others dreams. A true servant leader wants others to succeed and is willing to help others achieve their dreams. For true success is success for all!

  • dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

    As law enforcement officer we tend to take on the role of a servant leader when we are hired. we become the servant leader for the public. But we need to understand that we also need to be servant leader for our subordinates. Some leader fell that is beneath them to be servant and that should not be the case. We must ensure that we do everything we can to make sure our followers succeed. they succeed ultimately ensures your success.

    • mmoscona@floodauthority.org

      This is so true. We all know that we serve the public, but to many officers and forget that we should serve each other also.

    • Durand Ackman

      You are correct, we need to remember to be a servant leader to our subordinates. If we all took that mindset and leadership style, the organization would be much better off. I have had leaders in the past that definitely don't have the servant leadership mindset and you are correct, it felt like they thought serving their subordinates was below them.

  • s police officers, we are servants to the citizens of our communities. It is our job to serve and protect the greater good. Often leaders forget to be servants for others and rely on their employees to work for them. This lesson provided valuable insight on how being a servant to others as a leader will provide you with success. Servant leaders make dreams come true and are willing to sacrifice for the greater good.

  • mmoscona@floodauthority.org

    I think we should all strive to be servant leaders. Far to often we see in our profession where leaders are only interested in what they can get out of it. They are only interested in recognition and promotions at the expense of those around them. These are not good examples for our younger officers and will create a climate of back stabbing that could destroy the culture of an organization.

  • During this program and in the ICLD, which I am still working on, we have covered servant leadership, in the past. With that said, it is sometimes difficult to embrace the name, not the concept. As stated by LTC Spaiin, this goes to more than the clergy or medical fields and that there are many out there that have been practicing the concepts, without knowing the names.

    A few years ago was offered a good piece of advice y an old friend and mentor. He told me that the officers on my watch, that I supervised, did not work for me, that I worked for them. It was my job to take care of them and to see to their needs. He was right, and neither of us had heard offff servant leadership, at that time.

  • Lt. Mark Lyons

    I firmly agree with the principles of servant leadership. The concept of working to see others succeed is one that I regularly discuss with our supervisors. There are several elements of this training module that I believe are important for leaders to possess. After watching this training module, I am reminded of the value of being a servant leader and will try to do more to incorporate the principles of servant leadership in to my daily responsibilities.

    • Mitchell Gahler

      I agree that there are several elements discussed in this module that we need to emulate in order to be a servant leader. They possess so many characteristics that make everyone around them better. This was a great module to view, which provided me with many areas to incorporate into my daily behaviors in order to bring out the best in myself and everyone I interact with.

    • Stephanie Hollinghead

      This is something I am always preaching to my staff. It is our job to take care of our people, let's do it. Invest time in them. Let's get out there and work as a team. In the end, we will grow to appreciate and support one another. We should want our team members to succeed.

  • This module is contributory to me for developing an understanding of being patient and accepting of all people we encounter. That can be in the field or it could be at your agency. We don not "always see" things or perceive scenarios that people may be in. As a leader, we need to understand someone's reality may be skewed, including our own. We need to grow, enhance, and empower the people we work with, lead, or contribute to without expecting anything in return.

  • wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

    In this module I learned a servant leader focuses on teamwork and interpersonal relationship, while taking time to allow others to understand their weaknesses, strengths and their potential. A servant leader, in my opinion is a leader with a heart. Not to be mistaken as weak or soft, because a servant leader is one that can be identified as strong, disciplined and goat oriented.

  • Being a servant leader should be the aspiration of all leaders. I bet all of us can count on one hand how many true servant leaders we had. It is nice to see these thought concepts making their way into our line of work. Employees have been treated so poorly over the years, and I believe it is directly associated with the current political climate we live in. Our job is to protect and serve, which should make every officer a servant leader, but many want to act on their terms and not those in need.

    • Kyle Phillips

      I agree that we should all aspire to become a servant leaders. I think we all started with the idea of serving, however with the media's constant negative attacks on LE and the lack of facts brought forward to the public surrounding our profession causing misunderstanding and distrust, serving becomes harder to do and survival becomes the objective.

  • Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

    Servant leadership is the most effective modern style of leadership available. The servant leader always does anything possible to make everything the best. A great leader works to make others succeed. The values a servant leader puts others first and brings high energy to all around. Training in this type of leadership is a daily reminder to be a better person.

    • Joseph Flavin

      You nailed it; be a better person. Servant leadership reminds us to do that. Put others first and do all you can for the betterment of others.

  • Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

    This module gave me a lot to think about in regards to being a servant leader. You must be focused on the people around you. Your concern is for the success of others and the organization, not yourself. A servant leader needs to be unselfish and have the insight & understanding to get the goal accomplished. If we all acted more like this, many internal conflicts would go away.

    • Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

      Yes, We most show concern for our subordinates. showing that you care will accomplish that goal that we all need to reach and that is trust.

  • Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

    At the beginning of your career as law enforcement officers, we take on a role known as servant leaders. We must make certain that the officers that come behind us succeed. When the officers flourish, it ensures our success. Whenever an incident occur during our shift and my subordinates responds properly, my Sergeant and I give them praise that rewards their performance. Before releasing my shift for tour of duty, I express to them I desire that everyone returns home in the same manner they reported for duty. That is by walking out of this building on their own, healthy, and unharmed. I encouraged my subordinates to work safe and work as a team. Considering, I care for them and they are a part of my family. This is what being a servant leader means to me.

    • Lt. Marlon J Shuff

      YES! You should treat them like a member of your family. But, how many leaders attend weddings, birthday parties, etc? Servant leadership is about caring for your people, both on and off duty.

    • James Schueller

      Great examples of taking this module's learning points and putting it into action. The people that serve under you will certainly follow your example and "pay it forward". This is what leaving a legacy is all about.

  • Lt. Marlon J Shuff

    Servant leaders place primary importance and focus on their officers as their principal concern. It doesn't mean that accomplishing the agency's mission, goals, and objectives aren't important. Instead, focusing on their employee's welfare and needs will drive them to accomplish the agency's goals and objectives. It's quite a simple concept. Sacrifice your own self-interest for the good of the group. NEVER take credit! Them before you!

  • Mitchell Gahler

    In this module, Spain described becoming a servant leader. Each and every one of us should aspire to become a servant leader. One of the main points I took from this module was that a servant leader focuses on teamwork and personal relationships, as they create confidence and enthusiasm in others. A servant leader focuses on the success of their team and encourages others to work towards thriving both for the betterment of their organization and on a personal level. Servant leaders also listen first and speak second. “Because of their efforts to empower others, the servant leader takes time to allow others to understand their weaknesses, strengths, values, and most importantly, their potential.” We all should thrive to be a servant leader…

    • In working through the module on servant leadership you are definitely on the right track. The main principle is putting others before self no matter where you are at in the organization. If everyone in our organization were to do this we would definitely end up with selfless service and a definite feeling of family with many working as hard as they could to please others.

  • Joseph Flavin

    Servant leaders put others before themselves. R'ami Spain talks about becoming a servant leader. She goes over the nine characteristics of effective, caring leaders. Servant leaders focus on improving the others around them for the betterment of the organization as a whole. They genuinely care about people and will invest their time and effort in others. Seeing others succeed is more important to them than self accolades. Leaders eat last.

  • I have used the term servant leadership in our organization many times. It is good to work through this module to see if our organization is in line with servant leadership principles. For the most part, we talk about servant leadership very similarly but most of our focus has been focused on servant leadership within our community. I like this module because it seem to focus on servant leadership within the organization and our employees. I have thought about servant leadership in these regards but did not focus on that aspect as much. I realize that servant leadership encompasses community and the organization and I am going to work on the organization focus more going forward.

    • Chad Blanchette

      I had not really connected the dots prior to this module that we really are our teams servants. We support them in a way that allows them to effectively do their jobs both physically and mentally.

  • James Schueller

    Servant leadership is really about doing what is best for people and the organization by building and maintaining interpersonal relationships. I really keyed in on the point "Choose to seek opportunities to practice servitude when others seek the limelight". I truly believe that when you work for the ones you supervise, they will not only take care of you, but the entire organization as well. The module covered the nine characteristics of a servant leader, but I took most from the section on Strategies for Becoming a Servant Leader. All were good, but #5 was the real selling point for me- Delegate, educate, and Inspire. Again, since I appreciate good quotes, here was my big takeaway; "You can only inspire people that understand you value them and are personally vested in their success."

    • Ryan Manguson

      Jim, I agree with you. Being a servant leader brings greater buy-in, engagement, and enthusiasm towards you common goals and values from those you serve.

    • Gregory Hutchins

      It is entertaining to watch people claim leadership traits based on a definition, going to a conference, or taking a survey. As described in the course, until one can embody and demonstrate servant leadership qualities, they are doing not only themselves a disservice but, more importantly, their personnel and the organization. Few understand the strategies, and even fewer are capable of demonstrating just a few.
      A significant strategy missed too often is to delegate, educate, and inspire. These emerging leaders receive the training as professional development to groom them for onward service, the fears of mistakes, and enabling others to grow. As seen in the previous module, fear sets in, and these topics become a book or folder in the bookcase

  • Kyle Phillips

    The idea of being a servant leader is empowering. Doing whatever it takes for the betterment of the organization and for the people within the organization. I really took away that a servant leader eats last, and makes sure that all who are under their roof have what they need to be their best and succeed and by doing this, the organization succeeds and thrives.

    • Paul Gronholz

      It is definitely empowering for the individual and the organization. If everyone had the same attitude of a servant, putting others before self, that would build incredible confidence and trust in each other.

  • Eduardo Palomares

    Being a servant leader can be confused as being weak because of the typical "leader" perception that generally makes people work for them. As a servant leader, we practice this style daily when we review and approve time off, go out to calls for service to make sure our people have the tools or equipment needed to be successful performing their duties. This theory really entails being there for your people first and foremost. However, lets not forget that a servant leader also serves up the chain of command as being a servant leader has not rank. Being a servant leader is about putting other's wants, needs, and goals first and working toward helping people achieve and fulfill them.

    We can't forget the mission of a police organization which is to "Serve and Protect" the public. Equally important is to "Serve and Protect" those around us specially the people that work with us. We can all benefit from applying this leadership theory in order to provide better services to all those we come in contact with. When we serve our officers, they serve the public because this type of attitude becomes contagious. In summary, servant leadership is seeing the good in people and being aware that we all make mistakes. Servant leadership is really a sign of strength because practicing this challenges the status quo of conventional leadership styles.

    • Maja Donohue

      I agree that service to others is contagious in much the same way that spreading kindness or good attitude is. No matter who they are, people want to feel like they belong, and one way to make that happen is to let them know that they matter by looking out for their best interest. I think people misunderstand the term servant leadership because they only focus on one word, when in fact leadership in any form is a strength and servant is a style.

    • I enjoyed reading your discussion post and the reminder that one of our missions in law enforcement is to Serve and Protect. Your paralleling this to or module is great. and I agree that Servant Leadership is a practice of strength beyond measure.

  • Chad Blanchette

    This module supports some of the other modules we have completed. One of the highlights for me was the reinforcement of LISTENING and not just hearing.

    • Christopher Lowrie

      Listening and not just hearing is huge. There have been times when I stopped listening just because i was waiting to speak. It is better to flow with the conversation while listening and truly caring. A refresher in active listening skills is a good thing.

  • Ryan Manguson

    There was a lot of great information in the module. There were some great takeaways from the 9 characteristics of servant leadership. I like the one on listening. "Only a true natural servant automatically responds to any problem by listening first". This is a good reminder to actually listen. Not just hear someone.

    • Magda Fernandez

      I agree with you. We as leaders need to listen and internalize what people are saying in order to understand what they need. Every employee is different and require assistance at different levels. Some may need a hands on approach others may need coaching. It has taken me a while to learn and improve my listening skills and be in the moment without distractions. I have learned significantly more about the people i am surrounded by and been able to better help my team by just listening and learning.

  • Paul Gronholz

    I enjoyed this module and have attempted to adopt a servant type of leadership. Unfortunately, it's too easy to falter and become selfish, especially when it appears that seemingly selfish people are rewarded for being the opposite of a servant. This style of leadership should be an easy thing to adopt as to serve and protect is widely used by police departments across the country. To me, this means much more than just serving my community. True service means putting others and their needs ahead of my own. How often do we actually do that for each other? Sadly, I do that very rarely. Being a servant type of leader will truly help empower others to be successful. It is not a weak style of leadership, instead, its powerful. Having confidence in yourself as a leader to give credit to others is truly selfless.

    • Ryan Lodermeier

      I agree Paul, this should be easy to adopt and implement. I think you nailed it when you said “truly selfless”.

    • Gregory Hutchins

      Seldom do members of the profession embody these characteristics as consistently. One of the traits we observe this most frequently is within the area of healing. Over the last few years, the profession has bloodied their noses and broken the sacred trust with the community they are supposed to serve. The greatest challenge in restoring confidence is the need to demonstrate through transparent action the ethics and values of the profession's members always have to do what is right and just.

  • Durand Ackman

    I enjoyed this module. I assume this is what we all strive for as leaders. Our employees are the ones doing the hard work but we are the ones in place to make sure they are able to overcome obstacles. I am a bit of a football fan so I was naturally drawn to John Harbaugh's explanation of servant leadership. I really liked his comment about leadership being pretty simple, do what you can to help others be their best. I also had a bit of an eye opening experience listening to him. He commented about four powerful words - "What do you think?" I used to be really good at asking my team their thoughts but I have found myself doing it less recently. I need to get back into this habit.

    • Sgt. Ackman brings up a good point. The phrase "What do you Think?" is powerful. This simple phase is very engaging but it requires the leader to listen to what ever the person may say. This is an open ended question and you should be prepared for what comes next. I often ask "How would you improve or change (insert issue here)?" I find this engages people and focuses their response. the manner in which a leader accepts this information and what they do with it, goes a long way toward building trust and respect. In retrospect, I too have become negligent is asking other's "What do you Think?". This is something that I will have to work on.

  • Ryan Lodermeier

    I couldn’t agree more with this module when it mentions that persons perception of the word “servant” simply means that they have a minimalistic role. This module went on to define really what a servant leader does, they make other around them better thus creating a more productive agency. The strategies for implementing this servant mindset were also laid out well, I like the first…Early or now. It sets the tone and tears down the idea that you have to wait to begin this style

  • Samantha Reps

    Servant Leadership is something that I think we all want at some point. I know I want to serve my entire organization not just the people I supervise. I can understand how people look at this as being soft but when everything is broke down in this lesson it truly shows that is not the case.
    Again, I enjoyed listening to Simon Sinek and he stated "If you hire people just because they can do a job they will work for your money, but if you hire people who believe in what you believe they will work with their blood, sweat and tears." With the way that society is today servant leadership, I think, is more important for your organization then some will admit.

    • Kelly Lee

      Excellent overview Sam, you hit the nail on the head when you quoted Sinek. People want to be a part of something bigger, something important, we just have to inspire, lead and believe in those people and the rest will take care of itself.

  • As I listened to this presentation two points came to mind. First, I found myself thinking of the qualities of an Authentic Leader. There are a lot of similarities between the two. The Servant Leader traits of Foresight and Perception are similar to the Authentic Leadership trait of Insight. The Servant Leader trait of Persuasion is similar to the Authentic Leader trait of Influence. Additionally, while servant leaders seek opportunities to provide service to others to help other be successful, the Authentic Leader uses Initiative and Impact to capitalize on success and make a positive difference on their followers. I think that the Authentic Leader is well on their way to being a Servant Leader. The second point is the importance of Withdrawing or pausing. Leaders that try to accomplish to much all at once can overtax a system that may not be prepared for that much change. It is up to the leader to conceptualize their end-state and then prioritize how the organization will reach it's goals. I saw this first hand in the military where I looked for leaders who were so focused on completing tasks to show they accomplished something that they didn't see how the entire process was damaging the people getting the work done. Leaders who stop, assess, re-orient and rally, get the support of their subordinates and are able affect real change.

    • Major Willie Stewart

      I couldn't agree with you more. This module was very inspiring and made me look at my leadership style. I think as a good leader should be combined with both leadership styles.

    • Jennifer Hodgman

      I couldn't agree with you more. There are several similarities between authentic and servant leadership!

  • Maja Donohue

    I appreciate the many strengths this leadership style has to offer, but I can also see why this style is not very common. More often than not, people’s competitive nature takes over and they forget that we are much stronger when everyone works to support each other. That being said, I strongly believe that mentoring, coaching, and delegating makes us better leaders. Someone once said: “you never really learn something until you teach it.” Leadership is no different. Coincidentally, we would not be leaders if it wasn’t for someone else who believed in us and inspired us to pursue service of others.

    • Perfect statements. We should be teachers often. Part of teaching isn't instructing but asking thoughtful questions from people. It inspires them and offers them a teaching moment to boost their influence. You're also spot on regarding others believing in us. Put people into positions because they earned the right to be there, then get out of their way. Trust that they'll do good things. No one takes the helm of the ship only drive it into the shore. They want to succeed, help them.

  • Kelly Lee

    What a truly great module, probably my most favorite thus far. I would like to think that I exemplify these very things. There is nothing more rewarding to me than serving others and the public. I come from three generations of public service in one form or another and am very proud to say that my son is following the family tradition and becoming a full time firefighter. Serving others brings out the best and as this module said, "it makes others dreams come true" how can that not grab you and make you want to be better and do more? Very inspiring module!

  • Major Willie Stewart

    Leaders should set a mission to help each other accomplish goals and dreams. Servant leaders bring an overwhelming amount of energy and confidence. Their efforts to empower others comes with compassion and allows others to see their strengths and understand their weakness and their potential. When we meet servant leaders, we are face to face with a leader who will enable balance both physically and mentally for the organization and individually. Servant leaders are dreamers and goal setters who are constantly growing their replacement. I feel the root of servant leadership empowers, uplifts and encourages other to accomplish the mission of organizational goals. This is a great module and gives an overall understanding to the positive effort in being a servant and a leader.

    • Timothy Sandlin

      Excellent points. The leader has to have a vision, being able to effectively communicate the vision, and inspire people to believe in the dream. They use enthusiasm and humbleness to embrace the heart of a servant and push everyone to the front.

  • Hearing Shay's story again and thinking about a lot of other videos we have all seen where kids are sacrificing their gain or a win for one person is humbling. We need more servant leadership in public safety. The most impactful thing to me in this module was knowing and understanding that people are generally well intentioned but they will make mistakes...we are all human after all. We still need to accept them, listen to them and guide them. By listening, pausing to reflect on a course of action and then teaching and delegating, we really focus on developing others and allowing them to reach their full potential. Even if it is one person at a time, we can grow our future servant leaders.

  • Christopher Lowrie

    I enjoyed the deep dive into John Harbaugh philosophy with the Baltimore Ravens. When Coach Harbaugh engages the people on the sidelines and asks them "So, what do you think?". It provides people with a platform they don't normally have and Harbaugh is able to learn from that. Sometimes everyone in an organization except the boss knows something needs to be changed. However everyone is scared to tell the boss. If the boss asks in a genuine fashion then the answer will appear. If the boss doesn't ask for input then many times problems are not brought to them.

    • Brad Strouf

      I agree. I actually thought that all the videos utilized in this module were beneficial and did an excellent job of illustrating the points being made.

  • Magda Fernandez

    This was a pretty good module. It emphasizes what we strive to do at my agency. I like that it focuses on the building of relationships through communication, listening, being humble and being selfless to make a difference. This includes making a difference in the people they work with and work for, which translates to the bigger picture of making an organizational difference. It takes a while and requires a mindset change but it can be done. This type of leadership and the effects from increases morale and leads to the retention of employees as well.

    • People want to feel lead, not ruled. People also enjoy responsibility and experiences. This is at the core of servant leadership. Be the resource others needs to do good things. Provide vision for them and then get out of the way unless you're needed. Trust the people, that's a hard one for people.

  • Jennifer Hodgman

    I enjoyed the video from Blanchard. His comments about our vision, values and goals was particularly interesting. If we have a compelling vision that tell us who we are where, we are going and what's going to guide our journey then goals goals have a meaning in relation to that. Without a compelling vision first, goals are seen as threat!

    • I enjoyed his video as well. It seemed very natural to him and made you feel he really cared about the success of the team and players. His idea that people will tell you amazing things if you just give them the opportunity seems real.

  • I found empowering irony in this section of learning . Becoming a true Servant Leader is a sign of universal strength in all aspects of your profession. Having the will power to put others before yourself and doing what's best to advance others and the community is the harder road.

    • Humility is where it's at. Be humble, let others shine. The glory we need is in the results our followers put forth from the vision we put forward. At the end of the day, let them have the victory lap. Likewise, fall on our sword when things don't go as planned. Like Edison said about inventing the lightbulb, sometimes it just takes a few tries to succeed.

  • The concepts of this module in many ways is the way I understood leadership overtime. The mindset that its not about you, its about them. Doing everything you can to let people see their potential and helping them get to where they need to be, even if it means helping carry their load in a moment of weakness.

    The opening video with Harbaugh seemed genuine and not what I was expecting from a NFL, but what you would expect from a professional leader. The information seemed natural to him and genuine.

    And, although the story about Shay was what life is all about, I can go a while without hearing that one again. How can such a good story be so sad at the same time. And I’m usually not that guy.

  • It takes a confident leader to put followers first, their needs, and their work. I have read Simon Sinek's books and watched many videos from him. His message is very good and straightforward. People don't buy WHAT we do, they buy WHY we do it. When we put others' interests ahead of our own, they will perform better for us and go the extra mile. Lastly, never sacrifice the people to save the numbers. In our business, we're not about dollar figures as much as we are about service. Nonetheless, if we raise our people up, build them up, they will go above and beyond.

    As leaders, we need to help our follower understand their purpose. This might not be immediately apparent but down the line, it will reveal itself. Mentor and coach the up and coming leaders to surpass us. Like Sinek says, leadership is very much like parenting. We want our kids to be better than us, the same holds true for our followers.

    • Parenting is very much like leadership. During the movie, "We Were Soldiers", LTC Hal Moore is asked by a young officer ho he can reconcile being a parent and a soldier. LTC Moore replies, "I hope being good at one, helps be better at the other".

      I've found that lessons learned parenting have helped me with leadership at work and lessons learned leading people at work have helped me be a better husband and parent.

  • As a leader it is important to remember that you are their to support your team and followers and to make them better. Most likely as a leader you are in a supervisor or administration position that holds more power or authority. However, using that power to belittle someone or to make them feel as if their work isn't valued is uncalled for. As a servant leader, the main priority should be to serve the community and the people that they lead which is most important. It takes someone that confident and comfortable to understand that just because they have more power and authority doesn't mean that they shouldn't respectful to the team and people that they lead. They will gain a lot of respect by giving respect to them.

    • Andy Opperman

      I think you make an important point about supervisors belittling people. Not only is it uncalled for it but establishes a reputation for that leader basically making them ineffective. In fact from there on out the only power that supervisor may have is there position of authority. They will have lost all referent power.

  • The simplest truths are the easiest to learn and the hardest to master. It is simple. Leadership is about putting others before yourself. You are there to serve them. To help them grow and achieve great things. I guess it is hard for some because it is a choice that you have to make time after time, day after day.

    • Thomas Martin

      I agree Jed, it can be a challenge when learning simple truths, as they tend to bog us down at times. Your statement reminds me of the “lead down and manage up” philosophy. Leaders must be willing to help their people grow, and understand, that the sky has no limit. We get complacent, and loose this leader mindset when dealing with our dilemmas, demands, and workloads.

  • Sgt. Shawn Wilson

    The people drive the organizational successes of an organizations and as leaders our people should always come first. There is a reason why the military always has the highest ranking member eat last. It is because even in the smallest detail ones people always come first and if there is no food available at the end; that is the cost of being a leader.

  • Andy Opperman

    I think we could all benefit in this world from servant leadership. As a competitive person myself I find myself getting caught up in the achievement or goal at times and not always looking at the bigger picture. I think as we age, we see more of the bigger picture in life, but we still get stuck in the daily routing and do not spend enough time listening to our people to truly serve them. I thought Ken Blanchard’s talk on the 4 parts of a compelling vision were also important. It really comes back to the “why” of everything we do. If as leaders we can help people understand the why of everything we do, organizational goals will be easier to achieve.

    • Matthew Menard

      I agree with you. We are leaders for a reason and must constantly work to better those around us. We must not get lost in the "me mentality" and think about the future of our agencies and communities.

  • Timothy Sandlin

    I think that many stories that involve inspiring acts that overcome significant odds most likely involve some form of servant leadership. It is the ability to place others ahead of oneself, see the big picture, understand opportunity to make an impact and make the world a little better for those you are involved with. This is encouraging review of leadership and the reason for becoming a servant leader.

    • Robert Schei

      I agree, I really enjoyed Simon Sinek discussing how servant leadership is like being a parent. Having children is a choice but engaging with your children as a parent demonstrates our servant leadership. Every day as a parent and as a leader in my organization I am always looking for ways to improve others outcomes - make their day, week, lives just a little better.

      • Jacqueline Dahms

        I agree with you Robert. Simon Sinek's comparison of servant leadership to parents is spot on. I also appreciate one of the strategies to grow/develop your replacement. I don’t want people to be as good as me, I want them to be better than me, just as I would want my kids to be better, do better than myself.

  • Nicole Oakes

    I really appreciate that Instructor Lt. Col. R'ami Spain using Jesus washing the feet of his disciples as an example of Servant Leadership. It helps for me to understand just how humble we should all be if we truly want to lead. Also important are the other characteristics of a servant leader; listening, imagination, withdrawl, acceptance, foresight, awareness, and persuasion.

  • Robert Schei

    Rather than collecting power servant leaders empower others. What a great quote, we are all the beneficiaries of those before us whom gave up some of their power to help us learn and grow. Servant leadership is the key to developing and maintaining heart within an organization. At times growth in an organization can erode our compassion for one another and our mission. Its imperative that we slow down and help others, we can accomplish so much more as a team than any one individual ever can. Excellent module.

    • Sgt. Samantha Koscher

      I agree Robert! Rather than collecting power, you are empowering others to do great things. It takes courage and humility to be able to put others before yourself. I do think this comes naturally to most law enforcement leaders as those are likely some of the core values of why we entered law enforcement in the first place.

  • Brad Strouf

    As often as I have hear the term servant-leader, I was never really fully aware of the details and strategies behind this particular method of leadership. This module did an excellent job in breaking it down and fully explaining the focuses and theories involved.

  • Servant Leadership has really been the norm lately compared to years ago. As a leader you have to have the where with all that being a leader you are not more important that the people that you lead. I do see some younger officers/deputies in our agency that have taken all of these leadership courses but are still putting themselves first, above the people that they maybe leading in the future. It is our responsibility to make sure that Servant Leadership continues in the future of our profession.

    • Ronald Smith

      Troy
      We have a couple of young people who have advanced quickly through the ranks and like you said they look after themselves first. It annoys me but they are not assigned to me. Unfortunately, they do not take the leadership portion of the job seriously but they do like the pay and work schedule. I am pushing for those individuals to get some real advanced leadership training like this course in the hope some of this common-sense stuff takes hold. It would be great to see them become servant leaders to the officers and the community.

  • Jarvis Mayfield

    A servant leader is one who trust their officers and will let you stumble but will not let you fall. . The reason I feel that Servant Leaders strengthen those around them is simple when you work for someone who cares about you professionally and personally then you care about the work you do.

    • Eric Sathers

      I agree. The more you feel supported and cared for, the more interested you will be in not only doing your job but doing it well.

  • Matthew Menard

    Servant leaders are those who are always looking for ways to better those around them. They don't do things for recognition or praise, but rather because it is the right thing to do and makes others better. They are good listeners and seek to find better ways to do things though active listening and engagement with others.

    • Sergeant Michael Prachel

      I liked that you mentioned active listening, and how to be a servant leaders you need to focus on listening. If we are always talking, telling others what to do or say, and not attentive to two-way communication, then we are missing a lot. Listening lets others know we care – they may see it as a show of respect. It seems like an easy task, but many leaders can struggle with just listening more attentive.

  • Gregory Hutchins

    It is entertaining to watch people claim leadership traits based on a definition, going to a conference, or taking a survey. As described in the course, until one can embody and demonstrate servant leadership qualities, they are doing not only themselves a disservice but, more importantly, their personnel and the organization. Few understand the strategies, and even fewer are capable of demonstrating just a few.

    A significant strategy missed too often is to delegate, educate, and inspire. These emerging leaders receive the training as professional development to groom them for onward service, yet, the fears of mistakes and failure affect their courage to enable others to grow. As seen in the previous module, fear sets in, and these topics become a book or folder in the bookcase. Like LT Scott in the case study, he received an education from the FBI NA and would not conduct train-the-trainer classes, especially when he is retiring.

    • Brian Smith

      Very well said, Gregory. Leadership goes far beyond checkboxes of training. It is engrained in one’s mind and soul in order to properly guide and influence those around them. Most certainly, I believe the fear of the leader is detrimental to the success of this characteristic.

  • Jacqueline Dahms

    Servant leadership seems to be the epitome of leadership. In most cases, those in law enforcement believe in servitude for our communities but rarely apply it to our para-military organizations. Within our organizations we look at accountability and structure, reward, and punishment. We seem to battle between authoritative, command and control styles with transformational or servant leadership. What stuck out to me was that the servant leader always stives for the greater good of those around them.

  • Marshall Carmouche

    A law enforcement officer is a servant to the public. Putting others before our selves is a good way to lead (and by example too). I often find myself putting others before me and serving them. I am blessed to have a leadership position in my agency. I am even more blessed to be able to be a serving leader to everyone. Being able to care for and share with someone, putting service before self, is a good feeling.

  • Ronald Smith

    Servant leadership is the very best of us being confident enough to place the needs of others, the community, and the department ahead of personal desires. I learned early in my adulthood that once I was in charge of people my fate was tied to their success. Creating an environment where people want to participate in the service of others is in my opinion a great accomplishment. I did agree with the downturn of personal contact for social media the idea of service has been diminished. As long as there is training and or educational programs to inform people about servant leadership there is a chance it will continue. This last year of lockdowns and virtual everything has created a challenge for a generation who would sit next to each other and text rather than talk.

  • Sergeant Michael Prachel

    When I think of Servant Leadership, I would have to agree with Simon Sinek’s analogy of parenthood. Without hesitation a parent would sacrifice themselves for the child. When hungry, they’d allow their child to eat first. If they were thirsty, they’d still give their drink to their child. Overall, servitude is something that goes with being a parent. Law enforcement personnel who choose to be servant leaders put their community and employees first. They are like parents, willing to sacrifice individual success for the benefit of others.

  • Thomas Martin

    Robert Greenleaf stated, “how much we care, depends on us, it’s a choice.” This is a simple and powerful quote from the Servant Leadership lecture. As a leader, it is our choice to care about our people and their wellbeing. We should always have concern for their physical and mental state as we will also answer for their actions. More importantly, we must consider that they will one day replace us, and will model many of our actions and inactions. If a servant leader exists for the sake of others, we must find a way to care for our employees as much or more than the work needing to be done.

  • Paul Brignac III

    I feel that a critical component of developing into a servant leader is confidence, In my opinion an individual must be confident enough in their own abilities and achievements that they can take the time to focus on others. I believe security in ones self and abilities makes it possible to step back from the limelight and help someone else.

    • Stan Felts

      I think you just explained the secret of servant leaders. Every servant leader I have ever known was someone who was confident in their own abilities and achievements. Leaders, who are always trying to prove themselves to others, never take the time or make an effort to help others.

  • Sgt. Samantha Koscher

    I enjoyed the video of Coach Jim Harbaugh in the beginning of the lecture. A few key concepts I took away from the Harbaugh video were doing what is needed to make others better, and its important to be out there with your people. Its important to care and build trusting relationships with your people. The best way to do that is to listen to what they have to say and help them become better.

    • Steve Mahoney

      I agree. Too many times we sit behind a desk and make decisions on what we think is best. As a leader we need to be out with people on our team seeing things first hand and developing those relationships. This will make the organization as a whole stronger

      • Scott Crawford

        Exactly. In my department myself and the Captain try to spend as much time on the floor with our people, as well as the offender population. Since starting this class, that has been hampered severely. But the amount of respect and knowledge you can learn by visiting and listening to your team is immeasurable.

      • I totally agree. The leading by walking around principal is very effective. I didn't understand how this could be accomplished in my youth, but now I have great leaders who model this leadership style often and effectivly.

  • Eric Sathers

    Becoming a servant leader is the penultimate achievement of leadership. It is an incredibly difficult bar to reach but has tremendous potential for those who can get there. I don't think there is anyone who wouldn't want to work for a true servant leader; someone who cares about you and the greater good more than themself. Who wouldn't want a leader who sets their own ego aside? While these types of leaders don't seek personal reward, the funny part is that their actions encourage their followers to reciprocate the same generosity back. You can end up in a situation that is truly a win-win. There is probably no better leadership style to generate trust and credibility.

    • Buck Wilkins

      I agree with your comment, I had a leader like this once and he always put everyone else first and never took the credit for himself. He was a true servant leader and an authentic leader. Not everyone has a chance to have one of those in their lifetime but I am grateful that I did.

  • Steve Mahoney

    I liked Coach Harbaughs quote of "what do you think" Those 4 words embody the definition of a great leader and a servant leader. It shows that not one of us is bigger, smarter or better than another. It makes everyone feel important and part of the solution process. I think that this is important for the Servant leader as it puts the team before the individual

  • Scott Crawford

    This lecture really appealed to me. I`ve often thought of what kind of leader I would consider myself. I would say I`m a combination of several types. But after the lecture, I strive to be a Servant Leader. I love the thought of being able to empower others, and to train our replacement.

  • Travis Linskens

    Servant leadership is an essential topic in law enforcement. Putting others before ourselves, listening thoroughly with empathy and compassion can have a significant impact on relationships within an organization.

  • Buck Wilkins

    I believe that if there were more servant leaders in law enforcement today we would not see the turnover in jobs that we see now. In my area many agencies are hurting for employees I personally feel that many officers leave because they are not happy with how they are treated by their leaders.

    • Derek Champagne

      Buck,

      I agree. It seems that every Agency is hurting for people and everyone always wants to talk about morale. The truth of the matter is that people are leaving because they are unhappy with their leaders and the way they are being led.

  • I think the idea of a servant leader is very important and how it’s detailed in this module was insightful. I like how Sinek compared it to a parent with a child wanting them to grow and succeed. I also like how bad parents, can also be related to bad leaders. Those who simply do not care about their child and are indifferent or don’t possess any of the servant leader characteristics. It’s a great analogy that I got a lot from.

    People often misunderstand the term “Servant Leader” and feel as though it is a weak style of leadership. Discuss why, in fact, practicing Servant Leadership not only shows strength, but strengthens those around the Servant Leader.

  • Brent Olson

    I would definitely say this has been the most thought provoking module yet. The concepts of servant leadership are much more in-depth than I think many leaders know. Sinek said that trust and cooperation are feelings not emotions. You can't tell someone to trust you as a leader or cooperate with you. These result from the environment I create as a leader and that we all work in every day. He also said leadership is not a rank, but it is a responsibility and a choice. I think many times in law enforcement it is easy to forget some of the leadership concepts that are so important. I think back to (12) hour shifts over the years where it has been call to call, crazy busy, and we weren't able to do anything other than scramble to keep up and barely control the chaos. I think of my recent shifts like this as a leader, and find myself thinking back and applying the concepts of servant leadership. I am self-reflecting on did I apply any of the concepts, and if so, how? If I did, they were concepts that were already ingrained in my daily actions and behavior. I certainly didn't have a moment to intentionally think about or apply them. It has made me aware that internalizing this leadership concept into my daily actions and behavior hopefully allows me to apply it, without even having to think about it.

    • Robert Vinson

      I think you've mentioned some really important points. Noting that you can't simply order followers to trust you and dictate their feelings about your leadership without building relationships and trust.

    • Kenneth Davis

      Brent- I thoroughly enjoyed this section as well. Quite a bit of what we do at my Department tracks right alongside of the strategies shared in this module. With a few minor tweaks, its almost as if this strategy was written for our Command Training Course. However, there are several improvements I will make since reviewing this module. I'll want to include some of Sinek's work and specifically his talk on leaders eating last- I like the way he presents the concept and I am a fan of his writings.
      Best and stay safe-

      Ken

  • Derek Champagne

    As a leader, it is important that we show the ones we lead that we are not above anyone, especially them. We have to continue to put their needs before our needs and as a leader, we eat last. These words could be used while eating, but also could be used in other aspects of the job.

    • Zach Roberts

      Derek,
      I completely agree with this. We as leaders need to make sure we show our subordinates that we are not above anyone else and we are there to work beside each other. I also agree that we need to put the needs of those we lead above our own. Very well written post and straight to the point.

  • Jay Callaghan

    When I think of servant leadership, I think of this quote from Gates of Fire, "a king does not require service of those he leads but provides it to them. He serves them, not they him" (Pressfield, 1998). This is a great read on servant leadership.

  • Robert Vinson

    One attribute that stuck out to me regarding becoming a servant leader was the ability to "delegate, educate, and inspire." I know I've caught myself on more than one occasion just doing something myself because it was easier than delegating, or handling a situation myself instead of using the opportunity to educate. The ability to inspire others I believe is especially invaluable and something I know I need to improve upon.

    • Chris Crawford

      Yes, I too can relate to that. I have on more occasions then I should have found myself handling a task out of frustration because I wanted it done a certain way instead of ceasing the moment as a teaching opportunity.

    • Kevin Balser

      Robert
      I have also caught myself taking on the responsibility myself rather than inspiring others to take on the challenge. I have to be more inspiring to others moving forward.

    • Darryl Richardson

      Robert, I can relate to this. When I was a Booking Corporal, I was always in that same mind frame of just doing the job myself because it was easier to just get it done rather than try and teach others to do it or have someone else do it wrong and then have to go behind them to fix it. It was a hard lesson to learn and sometimes I still struggle with it.

    • Andrew Peyton

      This concept was something I first encountered as an FTO in the patrol division. It was always difficult to sit back and let others step up and take control. The thought of "I can do this much faster and more proficient" always came to mind. Obviously, this was not the role of an FTO, and recognizing that and taking the opportunity to educate someone else became something I learned to take pride in. This was one of the first times I experienced being a servant leader.

  • Kenneth Davis

    Servant Leaders (SLs) challenge situations of status quo. SLs work for their team-mates and seek to develop them at every turn. The very essence of SL is to train your replacement. Focusing on all of the tasks necessary to do so will imbibe a natural flow of leader characteristics in those who practice SL. SLs develop their folks first and prepare them to lead in the future. Doing so will strengthen the SL as well as the team as a whole- and the team they always put first.

    Leading in such a manner is cause for great strength. This style cannot be undertaken by those afraid to step up to the plate. It leaves the leader exposed for potential mistakes, but the SL embraces this as an opportunity to improve (Spain, 2021). This is a very connected style of leadership and is an excellent approach for mentoring future leaders.

    References:
    Spain, R. (2021). Leadership in practice: servant leadership. Module # 4, Week # 5. National Command and Staff College.

    • Ronald Springer

      Kenneth,
      I like and appreciate your summation. Servant Leadership is not for the faint of heart and it is the most impact way to train and reach people in a positive way. Taking care of your people should always be the top priority. When you take care of your people they will take care of the rest.

  • Ronald Springer

    As the father of a special needs child the story of Shay is deeply moving has a very powerful effect. I am familiar with the story having heard it before, but because of the emotions it evokes in thinking of my own son it still brings mist to my eyes. And that is a great demonstration of the power of a servant leader. Humility and service are the cornerstones of a true leader. I think everyone can think of examples when they witnessed someone being selfless in the service of others. Those men and women that ran toward the twin towers in New York on the fateful day did not do so for glory but in the name of service to their fellow man. Mahatma Gandhi did not change the fate of the British colony of India by bragging and demanding the limelight. It was through quiet but determined actions in the service of others that he made his protests that changed the world. Being a servant leader is one of my greatest ambitions because it is through truly selfless service that the greatest impacts are made. For those that are Christian nothing is more powerful than these words. For God loved the world so much that he gave his only begotten son.

    Spain, R. (2017). Servant leadership. Module 4, Weeks 5 & 5. National Command and Staff College.

  • Kaiana Knight

    This module really defined what a servant leader is. It also helped me better understand the definition of a servant leader and I see many of those characteristics in myself. The servant leader inspires, focus on teamwork, create confidence, teach, help others understand their strengths and weaknesses, and encourages others to work hard for their goals. Often times leaders forget to do those things. I also agree enjoyed learning the characteristics of a servant leader. A servant leader listens, have an imagination, pace his or herself, empathize with others, plan for the future, open to new ideas and opportunities, persuade others, and they love the organization and people they work for. I think this module really explained a servant leader in great detail.

  • Chris Crawford

    I really appreciated this module. I always thought it took more strength to put yourself in what may appear to be a vulnerable position to serve especially someone that works for you. To seize the opportunity to educate and think outside the box. To openly take the opportunity to teach, mentor, coach and train your own team not for yourself but for the other person(s), department and community.

    • Burt Hazeltine

      I agree, being a servant leader takes strength and confidence. But, if we take care of those who work for us they will take care of us. We will place ourselves in a position where we are taking care of our people and they are taking care of us.

  • Kevin Balser

    Although I am not a Baltimore Ravens Fan, I am a fan of John Harbough after listening to what he had to say about his leadership style and the way he empowers his team. I thought what he described as great a way to understand how he uses his servant leadership abilities. As a leader, Harbough said you have to find the people that need your help that day. That help may be to assist that individual with a professional or even a personnel problem. But as you serve those people by listening, it becomes easy each time to serve those individuals, because you know that you have surrounded yourself with good people. As a leader of his team, he said that he is not intimidated to ask people, "What do you think?" That is a great example of a servant leader.

  • Burt Hazeltine

    There was a lot of good information about a leadership concept that does not have a popular title. This is a style that I think most natural leaders have, at least to an extent. The leaders that take care of their people are the ones that have loyal followers. People that will follow them and trust that the leader always has their best interest in mind. The leaders that will put their people's needs above their own advancement or priorities will be the ones that are remembered as being good to work for even when they were tough.

    • I agree with you Burt, a good leader has a great team behind them. Its' as simple as you put it, you have to take care of those who take care of you. If you take care of your team, your team will take care of you. I hate when supervisors or a boss say " Joe works for me." What is wrong with saying "Joe works with me." Again make sure your members feel wanted and appreciated and your job will be much easier. Not to mention you'll sleep better at night.

    • David Mascaro

      I agree Burt. I have been fortunate enough to have learned this leadership style as a very young man when I joined the Marine Corps. Even if it wasn't described or defined as Servant Leadership. It was always about taking care of your people and putting their needs above your own.

  • Darryl Richardson

    Servant leaders have the vision to see and grasp what it takes to complete the mission. When a front-line officer sees their supervisor getting their hands dirty to help out, not for their self-gain, but for the good of the team, it inspires others to do the same.

    • Jose Alvarenga

      This is true. I have seem many times were leaders forget that part of their purpose is to serve those below them to accomplish a mission.

    • Kimberley Baugh

      I agree with you completely Darryl. I was once told by a previous supervisor, that the supervisor does not have to know how to do the job, he or she has to know how to be a supervisor. I completely disagreed with her. I believe as a supervisor you should know how to do all of the tasks your officers have to complete. You should be able to do them side by side with your officers.

  • Andrew Peyton

    One of the greatest things to stick out from this module was the story of Shay. These children had no idea of the impact they had on Shay and his father that day. They steppe dup and took the opportunity to put the needs of someone else before them. They taught a lesson and made an impact that they did not even realize they had done. Servant Leaders do this all the time, often not realizing the impact they may be having on someone. Often, it is not until much later they are even made aware of what they have done.

    • Jerrod Sheffield

      Andrew,
      I agree that we often do not realize the impact we have on others. The story of Shay really tugged on my heart strings because in that moment in time, people saw the greater good in what they were doing and made the greatest impact ever made in that boys life and for that, his father will forever be grateful and for them, they can know that they truly made a difference in someone’s life and made Shay feel on top of the world for that brief moment and it made all the difference in the world.

  • The module put a lot of things in perspective in reference to being a Servant Leader. We must be focus on the individuals around us and make them priority in a sense. Our focus has to be for the success of the individual and / or group. It cannot always be about us. A servant leader has to be unselfish and have the greater good in mind. A servant makes their subordinates feel wanted and appreciated; versus overworked and unnoticed.

  • David Mascaro

    This is by far one of my favorite learning modules so far. Although I never really titled it as Servant Leadership, it is one that I'm very familiar with from my time in the Marine Corps. Even as a junior enlisted man, you would put the needs of the private before your own. You were taught that from the top on down, and it was demonstrated on a daily basis. Even though rank had its privileges, the junior members still understood the purpose of that. This type of leadership spread through all ranks and created a brotherhood through camaraderie and a bond where you wished to do your best for the people to the left and right, as well as for your leader. Never wanting to let the group down. I'm still friends and communicate with members of my unit from 30 years ago.

  • Jose Alvarenga

    Servant leadership is a concept that was instilled in me from the beginning of me military service. The job of the supervisors is to be there for their subordinates. It is the leaders job to provide anything needed to those below him so that the mission can be accomplished. I can see how the title can be misunderstood. Being able to serve those who create the positive advancement of your team is a rewarding experience.

  • Brian Smith

    As Ken Blanchard said in the video, people need to know where you (the organization) is going and what you hope to accomplish. Without clearly defined vision, those following are lost, confused, and unable to aid the leader. A good servant leader recognizes sharing the vision has value, while a non-servant leader may be ashamed of sharing the vision out of fear of what others may think. Or they may not share the vision because they do not have one. In that case, a servant leader would admit they are visionless and need assistance in creating a guiding philosophy to accomplish great things, collectively as a group. Servant leaders recognize their weaknesses and know they need to rely on others. The non-servant leader assumes others will think the leader is simply clueless. Either way, communicating clear, understandable visions is vital to the empowerment and growth of an organization.

    • Jeff Byrne

      I agree, Brian. A theme throughout this leadership course is clear communication, empowering people around you, and mentoring so our replacements can be cultivated.

  • Jeff Byrne

    I would say all of us are servant leaders to some extent, but should always be building upon this form of leadership. It is a reminder that we must continue to build relationships and practice interpersonal communication as much as possible because of the divide and separation we are seeing around the country in society itself. I liked the strategy on going "upside down" to really influence our younger officers and deputies towards servant leadership at some level while still being able to have influence on our veteran staff as well.

    • Jared Paul

      Jeff,

      This is a good view point you have, that everyone to some extent is a servant leader. I would agree and second your statement of always building on this style. It is a great leadership style and when done right it can bring huge benefits to you and those around you.

    • Donald Vigil

      Jeff, I liked that fact that you mentioned the separation we are seeing around the country. I believe if more officers acted with this mindset when dealing with citizens it would help bridge the gap between the "us vs. them" mentality.

  • Zach Roberts

    This was a great module! Having not understood the concept of servant leadership, this module was very informative to me. A servant leader has the ability to delegate effectively as well as educate and inspire those he or she leads. As a leader, I tend to find myself lacking on delegating tasks effectively. I have been a just do it myself kind of guy so that it gets done. This module really taught me how delegating is a task a servant leader must possess. I have been able to inspire others throughout my career and look forward to be able to inspire others through my leadership.

    • Andrew Ashton

      Zach is right in the respect that to become a servant leader you must inherently possess the ability to trust and delegate. This is not only essential for your leadership style but it helps future leaders to grow and realize their own style as well. By modeling servant leadership we start to instill those same qualities an values in those around us.

    • Kimberley Baugh

      Zach, I couldn't agree more. I really enjoyed learning about Servant Leadership. I have to say delegating is also a weak point of mine that I have to strive to do better in.

  • Jared Paul

    Servant leadership is actually my favorite style of leadership. I have spent a lot of my time as a supervisor focusing on this style. I am happy to hear Lt. Col. Spain give Jesus as an example of servant leadership. I have a book titled, Lead Like Jesus, that covers more in detail Jesus' servant leadership style. This is very important to me because I feel we as leaders need to take care of our crew. I always try to put my officers first and address any needs that they currently have. I agree that this style might be hard for some law enforcement officers to use, but it is very beneficial when done right.

  • Donald Vigil

    While the nine characteristics of a servant leader are not easily attained, the benefits of better collaboration, stronger teams, loyalty, commitment, positive work environment, strong culture of belonging, and greater organizational agility makes me feel that this style of leadership valuable and worthwhile.

  • Andrew Ashton

    This was a very relevant module. I personally believe in servant leadership as it fosters the collective thinking with the team. When all parties feel empowered and appreciated, that is when true innovation can occur. It helps to foster buy in to both the team goal but to the overall mission of the command. In our role this is simply achieved a large portion of the time by delegation as it leads to feelings of trust.

    • Andrew, I agree with your assessment. A servant leader will help foster "buy in" to the team as well as the the overall mission of the organization. A servant leader is their to support, guide, and mentor the employees to accomplish the goals. Also, they are their to support them in the mission.

  • Glenn Hartenstein

    I just finished reviewing this module, "Servant Leadership". When I first heard the concept, I, like many others, thought this was a weak style of leadership. After learning about this style of leadership, I definitely see the benefit of empowering others by getting in the "trenches" with them. As far as the leadership part of Servant Leadership, I found the video by Ken Blanchard did a great job summarizing the role as a leader in this leadership style. He said, " The leadership part in Servant leadership is vision and direction". Leadership is about going somewhere!. Definitely gave me a different perspective on this style of leadership.

    • Rodney Kirchharr

      Glenn - While I understand the feeling that this could be a weak style of leadership, when you see it in action it is definitely not weak at all. It builds some of the strongest bonds of any leadership style that I have ever witnessed.

      • Dan Sharp

        I agree Rodney. I have had the opportunity to work for a servant leader. At the time I had not heard of this concept, but knew the leader had our back, truly cared for us and he was investing in making us better. For that the guys on the shift would walk through fire for him. Never did we see his style of leadership as week. He was one of the strongest leaders I have ever worked for.

  • Curtis Summerlin

    I especially liked the Strategies for becoming a Servant Leader. I realize that I see this style in many of the people that I look up to as leaders. If one is disciplined and focus’ on employee’s growth, I believe people will be drawn to an individual and they will want to follow his or her lead. This is when the vision for a team will began to come together and all will be empowered towards success

    • Tyler Thomas

      Absolutely. I agree that if we focus on employee growth, they will be drawn to us as leaders and then display the same characteristics.

    • Steven Mahan

      Curtis, working for you, I saw what a servant leader was. You always made sure your squad was cared for and supported. You assisted in training and discipline when needed to make us better deputies. That discipline that I needed regularly helped me be the Sergeant I am today. Even today, I trust you and would follow you in any mission.

  • Tyler Thomas

    I had never heard of this concept prior to this module. The information was presented nicely and in great order. The strategies and characteristics for becoming a Servant Leader were valuable to me. This module explained the what, how, and why we should all be Servant Leaders. If everyone in an organization acted like this, the empowerment within would be unstoppable.

    • Joey Brown

      Tyler, I agree that when employees feel empowerment at work, it creates a stronger work performance, job satisfaction, and commitment to the organization.

    • Tyler, I would say look to your parents or your current family to see what servant leadership looks like. Although you may have never heard of this concept prior to this module, you have probably seen it growing up and didn’t recognize it for what it is.

  • Jerrod Sheffield

    This module explained the best ways we can accomplish becoming a servant leader. I especially was drawn to the fact that active listening is one of the most important things that leaders can do to display servanthood. Following the 9 characteristics of servant leadership is paramount in becoming the best leader one can possibly be. We should strive daily in understanding and sympathizing with others. The story told about Shay really hit home and was a true example of what servant leadership is about.

  • Joey Brown

    Many law enforcement leaders today have a traditional mindset that is primary focused on helping an organization strive. Though, leaders in many cases are unsuccessful in implementing the vital element of putting employees first. From experience, a lot of supervisors I have worked with like tell people what to do, but fail to ensure their employee’s needs are being met. I have found when a leader follows the traditional model of leading, the outcome will only generate compliance and nothing more.

    • Trent Johnson

      Joey,

      Do you think that a traditional model of leading only producing compliance is a product of generational differences, or will that model produce mere compliance no matter the generation?

  • Trent Johnson

    The concept of servant leadership seems to portray a get in the trenches mindset, but yet, both Sinek and Spain discuss delegation and pointing the team in the right direction and them letting them go and do. I think finding a balance in this aspect is difficult. Making this style of leadership relationship based, I think you build relationships with your people, but then pointing them in the right direction, even if you empower them to go and do, they may feel as if you are abandoning them instead of being in the trenches, but as the leader you have to focus on more that the day-to-day.....so, how do we find that balance?

    • Dustin Burlison

      I completely understand your dilemma, Trent. My perspective is that while we have to let them drive the car, we should still stay in the passenger seat to help guide and coach them along the way. This way, we are empowering them but not abandoning them.

    • Mitchell Lofton

      Well said. Our patrol sergeants understand servant leadership, and some of them excel at it. Still, they are often undermined and overridden by patrol lieutenants who are only looking for their next promotion or retirement.

  • I believe all great leaders exhibit some form of servant leadership. I witnessed it during my time in the military. Leaders would support me and inspire me to be great. The would give me the knowledge and the tools to be successful. As I rose in rank, I started to learn about servant leadership and how important it is in developing young leaders.

  • Stephanie Hollinghead

    This module gave me a new perspective on Servant Leadership. I have some areas I need to focus on and practice. Specifically, strategies #4 and #5, listening, delegating, educating, and inspiring. I tend to rush and fail to listen thoroughly, and delegation is one of the hardest things for me to do. Focusing on these areas would help me become a better leader. I love the philosophy behind being a servant leader. Sharing power, putting the needs of others first, and supporting and developing your people who are the future of the department. I think in many ways I already practice this; I just need some fine-tuning.

    • Jared Yancy

      I, agree Stephanie! As a servant leader, you're a "servant first" you focus on the needs of others, especially team members, before you consider your own. You acknowledge other people's perspectives, give them the support they need to meet their work and personal goals, involve them in decisions where appropriate, and build a sense of community within your team.

  • Dustin Burlison

    Servant leadership is powerful. While many of us think of ourselves as leaders, we should pause and ask ourselves how we can better serve our team. One was I have failed in my attempt at servant leadership is the expansion of my circle of influence. It makes perfect sense how this can help me make others better, I've just never put much though into it. Great module.

  • Kimberley Baugh

    Servant leadership is what everyone should strive for. Servant leaders are willing to put others first for the greater good. Leaders need to follow the characteristics mentioned in this module in order to become servant leaders. I feel after reviewing this module, I need to focus on delegating and teaching. I do find that I will be that person to just do the job because it will be faster for me. But I realize I need to take the time to teach my people. I need to give them more knowledge in order to empower them.

    • Matt Lindsey

      Kim, delegation is an area I need to improve in as well. That portion of the training stuck out to me. Too often, I do fall into the trap of it is quicker if I do it myself and need to show more faith in those I work with.

  • Steven Mahan

    A servant leader is what we should all aspire to be. I have had outstanding servant leaders, and because they gained my trust, I would have followed them into anything. They earned that trust for a servant leader, ensuring that I knew my best interest was looked after. The relationship made me excel and helped us fulfill the agency’s mission.

    • Adam Kronstedt

      Steven, that is a great perspective. I also have have great leaders who haven't been afraid to step in alongside me completing tasks certainly not described in their description of duties assigned to their higher ranks. This also helped them to earn my trust and following.

  • Jared Yancy

    While traditional leadership is focused on helping an organization thrive, servant leaders put the needs of their employees first. They focus on developing individuals who perform their best. Servant leaders empower others to achieve goals as a team and organization. Stewardship is a key component of that because it focuses on trust that has been developed as the lifeblood of the organization.

  • Adam Kronstedt

    I appreciated R'ami Spain's inclusion on the events taking place at the last supper with Jesus. It truly was a depiction of humbling one's self to serve those who follow you. These disciples followed Jesus for three years and were able to see His greatness and power. They were able to truly understand what it meant to be a servant leader when the one they so admired and so passionately followed, humbled himself to wash His the feet of His followers.
    Showing how important everyone in our organizations are by showing true interest in them and serving alongside them helps us all to move in the same direction of a shared goal.

    • George Schmerer

      I also appreciated this analogy. When you truly examine this event through the lens of servant leadership you see that Jesus stepped outside of social norms to demonstrate what it truly means to be a servant leader. He didn't have much discussion, he just did it. He had the status of a leader, and yet he took on the real-world duties of a servant to teach a valuable lesson. He placed value and importance on his followers to build them up to continue what he started. He was training his replacements. Jesus is an excellent example of servant leadership.

  • Rodney Kirchharr

    While having heard the term servant leader before, the explanations given in this module bring so much more to light for me on what it really means. When working alongside your people and developing them into leaders it is important for them to know that you are right there with them. Developing the mentality of servant leadership is important to building the bonds that will for a cohesive unit to accomplish the missions of the agency.

  • Deana Hinton

    Servant Leadership develops an environment where the people come first. As a result, trust and cooperation become common place and individuals understand their weaknesses, strengths and their potential. Empowerment is borne and as it is practiced, the servant leader develops a team that is invested in the present and the future endeavors of the organization. They want to be part of it. We all want to belong, and the servant leader assures individuals belong and are valued.

  • Matt Lindsey

    Servant leadership means putting others before yourself. I have heard the term servant leadership prior to reviewing this module. A vital part of being a servant leader is that the care you express for those you work with is genuine. Truly caring for the people you work with and letting them know you have faith in their abilities to accomplish the mission is important. A servant leader focuses on the success of team members over themselves. This type of leadership is important in law enforcement. Embracing that we are public servants and putting the needs of the community and those we serve ahead of our own.

  • George Schmerer

    The concept of servant leadership is often misunderstood as a passive form of leadership. When in reality it is far more difficult. To truly embrace the concept of servant leadership you must be willing to put everyone else's needs before your own. This seems to go against the culture that is found in most businesses and organizations. When a leader focuses on the needs of the individual the team as a whole will benefit. Morale will increase, and people work harder knowing that their leader has their best interest at heart. This will also create a considerable amount of “buy-in”. The team truly trusts and respects their leader because the leader has demonstrated by their actions that they want the member to succeed. It is easy to tell someone you care about their success but when it comes to putting their needs before yours it shows them that you care and that they matter to the organization.

  • Dan Sharp

    In law enforcement we are in the people business and our people are our greatest assets. With this being so, we should all strive to be a true servant leader who genuinely cares for our troops. By putting others first and building them up, we gain respect and trust from our followers. We also set the example for them to follow which will ultimately make the organization better.

  • Michael McLain

    Prior to this lecture I totally misunderstood the term of a servant leader as the "yes" man of an organization. I now understand the pros of being about to be a servant leader and how it will not only build a stronger team but the organization as a whole.

  • Jeff Spruill

    I appreciate the language Lt. Col Spain used when she said "go upside down." She tells us to focus on subordinates needs first rather than focusing on the bosses. It can be difficult to so this because we have a natural and human desire to get noticed by the people who are above us (and whose opinions about us can therefore help or hurt us. Focusing instead on the people under us, and making our job to serve them and make their jobs easier may make our ambitions go a little slower. But if we consistently build strong teams and our teams consistently perform well, enjoy high morale, and develop their own skills, not only will we be doing more for them, but this consistency will eventually be noticed by our bosses as well. In this way, serving our people allows us to influence our organizations in both directions--up and down the chain of command.

    • Jeremy Harrison

      Jeff,
      Your analysis was essentially the topic of my essay for this module. I believe servant leaders show strength because they are willing to reject those temptations and desires to be noticed by those above them. I believe all servant leaders struggle with the desire to be in the spotlight or spend more time with their boss’s boss but instead of giving into those temptations, they care more about their people. I desire to be a servant leader. I believe in some ways I am a servant leader and in others I still have work to do. If we had an organization full of servant leaders, I can’t imagine how fun our work environment would be. Unfortunately, too many will not trust the process and will work instead to highlight how awesome they are while explaining how everyone else is not awesome at all. In this way, these leaders are attempting to demonstrate their leaders could not run the organization without them. I believe those leaders who highlight themselves while attempting to defame others, struggle with character weakness but are not without the possibility of redemption.

  • Jeremy Harrison

    As much as we have discussed servant leadership over the years, you would think officers would be used to the style. Unfortunately, when leaders implement servant leadership, it generally comes as a shock to those in the organization. I recently witnessed an incident where a supervisor was running the vacuum cleaner over their own office and a senior officer walked in saying they had never seen a supervisor vacuum their own office. The officer seemed impressed a supervisor would clean for themselves. Additionally, when supervisors spend time in the field with their officers, it generally appears to be foreign to the officers. Fortunately, the officers are typically excited to demonstrate their abilities and skills in front of the boss. Unfortunately, when some bosses work with their subordinates, they try to run the show instead of sitting back and empowering those subordinates to lead. If we had an organization full of servant leaders, morale would rarely be an issue, people would be better prepared to lead, and officers would be more committed to their community.

    • Jeff Spruill

      You mention a supervisor drawing attention by vacuuming his own office. I used to use this kind of behavior as a teaching tool with the younger patrol guys. I would often take out the trash (which was overflowing) in the 10 minutes before lineup while all the new guys were hanging around. Often, they would jump up to come help me. When they would comment on the fact that the captain was taking out the trash, I would say, "I hope I'm never too good to do whatever needs to be done." My hope was to demonstrate that attitude so that it would effect their attitudes in the field. I never liked it when officers took the attitude that "that's not my job. I'm the Poe-lice." I think that when a citizen has a simple problem and we fix it, even if it's not our job, we enhance our reputation with our residents. So int his way, our servant leadership also serves to set an example to our people of the attitude of service we want them to have toward our residents.

      • Kent Ray

        The “that’s not my job” attitude is something that I despise. I believe we need to try to teach servant leadership from the beginning of cadets socialization into police organizations. They need to understand and internalize that even if something isn’t directly related to their primary function, they need to work to provide assistance or help the person get the assistance that they need. Inside the department and in the field, I go out of my way to do things so officers have no excuse to think something is below them. I also expect subordinate supervisor s to do the same when practical.

      • Matt Wieland

        Great examples of servant leadership. I truly believe that any law enforcement leader who thinks that any activity is beyond their rank has already lost the battle. Even the Sheriff or Chief should be attending training with their troops, making a traffic stop, or jumping in as backup on a domestic.

  • Kent Ray

    I thought the nine characteristics of servant leadership were very educational. It spoke to how much more there is to servant leadership than what I had ever realized. I though servant leadership was simply leading by example, being willing to do anything that you expect form your people and putting their needs above your own to make their work easier. The nine characteristics have really expanded my understanding of servant leadership.

  • Andrew Weber

    Ronald Reagan quoted "The greatest leader is not necessarily the one who does the greatest things. He is the one that gets the people to do the greatest things." This is a quote that I have on all of the emails I send out. I feel that this is important. It is not about me, it is about everyone else. Who know that this was a part of Servant Leadership. I agree that the term Servant Leadership does not sound all that great when you first hear about it, but learning about it changed my mind about it. I am impressed with this style of leadership.

    • Tommy “Chris” Weeks

      Love the quote. I agree with you that the title of this style does not do it justice. We all are hopefully striving to be this type of leader.

  • Devon Dabney

    Great information in this module. Servant leaders focus on strengthening those around them. Its important to show your willing to eat last and makes sure that all other team members have what they need to be their best and succeed. Great leaders work to make others succeed.

  • Servant Leadership: When I think of a Servant Leader, I look no further than my wife. She embodies this module and has all the characteristics of a Servant Leader. Just insert family member or child where the module mentions employees or people. I have a great frame of reference where all other leadership styles pale in comparison. I like to think I’m the strong one, but truth be told, she is. As was mentioned in the module, this is not a soft leadership approach. The Servant Leadership characteristics create a strong team.

    Imagine the stability and harmony of an agency if the leader led using this style.

  • Matt Wieland

    The concept of servant leadership is often understated and under taught in our profession. Anyone accepting a leadership position should adopt the servant leadership style immediately, and it will pay dividends when building the trust of your followers. The concept of servant leadership should be most important to our profession because of the simple fact that great law enforcement agencies can only exist because of their most important asset: the individuals that take the oath.

    • Jason Doucet

      I agree. Compared to one of the most caring and compassionate natural instinct that we have. Its important to keep this concept in mind when helping others.

  • Chris Fontenot

    – Servant leadership is my most favorite style as it brings harmony, comradery, and unity to a team. Servant teams have true ownership of what they produce, good or bad. They have a high sense of responsibility and often step up when another member faces adversity.

    • Lawrence Dearing

      My favorite style as well, Chris! It makes it easier in dealing with multiple generations of people, all ages from all backgrounds. Leading from the front and taking responsibility for our successes and failures, but as a team, together.

  • Lawrence Dearing

    This module was inspiring. I enjoyed Sinek’s analogy of leadership to parenting in his interview. I also really liked Lt. Col. Spain’s lecture. Many of us, as public servants, have been servant leaders for a very long time. Sometimes, it is refreshing to hear that you are doing something right. I have to remind myself though, as Spain stated, to respond to problems by listening first. Finally, I liked the strategies for becoming a servant leader, especially the bit about not considering it too “warm and fuzzy” or “soft.” Our people need to know that we care about them. As Spain said, delegate, educate and inspire…grow your own replacement. Someone will have to carry on the legacy when we are gone.

    • Kevin Carnley

      I agree we should all strive to be a servant leader. I have warmed up to the warm and fuzzy part of leadership but I still feel it is a fine line that can be taken advantaged of. We have to be more vigilant as leaders of those with ill intentions in return.

  • Tommy “Chris” Weeks

    I got caught up initially in the idea of this leadership style being "soft" until Lt. Col. Spain spoke about Strategy #2 of becoming a Servant Leader and "disavowing the warm and fuzzy notion of the title. She made it clear when "aggressive responses are necessary", this style bodes well for it because it is based from a standpoint of empowerment, values, and protection.

  • Mitchell Lofton

    With all the changes in policing over the years, I see more and more agencies taking what appears at face value to be a softer approach. In reality, this more delicate approach to community policing reveals the human side of the badge to the communities we serve to build a stronger bond. The criminal element of our communities is still facing the same prepared and well-trained officers they have been dealing with for years. We did not become softer cops by changing our approach. Instead, we became better and more open-minded on how to get things done. The same is true of our leadership. We can change our course from “you go do this ” to “let’s go do this.” We can better prepare officers to lead when the time arises by serving our people.

  • Walter Banks

    I enjoyed this section on servant leaders because this is what I aspire to be. I have always considered myself a team player; team players believe personal success is good but not as gratifying as team success. As a Leader, my main concern has always been to promote growth and success in all the people I work with.

  • Lance Richards

    I know a few servant leaders. They are indeed the ones who inspire others and focus on bringing everyone up. This module spoke out about the importance of listening as a servant leader, and this is the one thing that stood out the most to me about the people I look towards as leaders. They give you their full attention when you come to them, no matter how small. This is one thing I focus on doing because I know how important this can be.

    • Jeremy Pitchford

      Session #015
      I think servant leadership is extremely important. I need to remind myself to focus when my people are talking to me. I allow myself to get distracted sometimes. I'm glad you brought this up.

    • Lance, good comment about listening and giving full attention. Nothing is more irritating and disrespectful than a supervisor answering the cellphone or text messages during a meeting where the subordinate is discussing important issues or sharing concerns about issues. Putting everything aside for others is vital.

  • Kecia Charles

    Servant leaders put others before themselves. They focus on strengthening those around them. They tend to want to propel the team to greatness, not just themselves. These ;leaders are selfless and sees the goodness of all. We all need to embody these characteristics.

  • Jimmie Stack

    In order for one to be a servant leader, they must put the needs of others before themselves. I have seen this in practice daily with many of the leaders I have encountered. To which, I have modeled myself and put it into practice when I deal with people. I am always looking for ways to be of service to others and always thinking about others.

  • Jason Doucet

    It is very important to practice Servant Leadership. As with many other things learned so far, we must be willing to take our time to help others where they may lack. It is our duty to keep in mind that an organization is not based upon one person. But everyone working together as a whole.

    • Paul Smith

      I also believe that it is not one person or leader that makes the organization great. It takes a team of leaders and followers to accomplish this.

    • Joseph Spadoni

      I agree we must be selfless and put others before ourselves. by doing this it will set the example and lead subordinates to do the same and begin to instill leadership in them.

    • Joe Don Cunningham

      I agree Jason. We must take the time to lift each other up. This is for the betterment of the whole agency, not just one or a few.

  • Paul Smith

    Servant leadership is important to me. I want my followers to want to follow me not because they have to. I see servant leadership as when someone makes a mistake or the wrong choice they know it before I have to see them. When a leader able to support the follower, the follower will always strive to make his leader look the best.

  • Joseph Spadoni

    Joseph Spadoni Jr.
    Session #15

    This is the first time that I learn of Servant Leadership. Learning what it means by its descriptions given in the module, I realized that I have been exhibiting traits of Servant Leadership without knowing I was doing so. I’ve never chosen to seek opportunities to practice servitude to be in the limelight, sure the recognition is nice, but I never went intentionally do things to get it. I did things because it is what was right to do as a person. Everyone as a team should be exhibiting the traits of Servant Leadership by doing so everyone in your team will be empowering one another.

    • Cedric Gray

      This last sentence caused me to pause and consider what it would be like to work with a team entirely possessed of integrity and servant leadership. This caused me to wonder why so few in our profession are selfless and develop good leadership traits. I think it is in our nature to be self-centered, and being selfless and serving others requires a hard turn away from tendencies that come naturally to us.

  • Cedric Gray

    A few times over the course of about five years, a former supervisor told my peers and me that we cannot be good leaders if we are selfish. Each time he said this, we were discussing instances in which one person's or a small group's self-interest led to impactful negative outcomes for the agency. This did not occur within our team, because this supervisor maintained personal integrity, was tireless, and was completely unselfish.

  • Joe Don Cunningham

    As being a servant leader and putting your people and community first, you show that you care more about them than yourself. In doing this, it builds trust within your agency and with the community you serve. Also by being the servant leader, hopefully the people who you lead will learn from this and they too will become servant leaders.

  • Kevin Carnley

    I have worked for many supervisor's and leaders over the years. The ones I remember were the servant leaders. How they put time in with people and showed they cared. Those leaders were successful and left a legacy. I know understand why the others who were not servant leaders were not as successful or missed when they left.

  • Elliot Grace

    Being a servant leader benefits the entire organization and is a great way to lead. I’ve worked for leaders that were servant leaders as well as those that were not. The atmosphere compared between the two types were as different as night and day. The shift of the servant leader had the higher number of officers that were eventually promoted or advanced on to other division. Conversely the shifts that didn’t have servant leaders had the highest number of turnover, low morale and they were dysfunctional. Being a servant leader is not easy and it requires being genuine or the leader will come across as being superficial and phony.

  • This module strengthens many aspects of how I see myself as a servant-leader—being there for my subordinates and supervisors and giving my full undivided attention. If others believe you don’t care about what they have to say, they won’t care about what you have to say. This is also an example of the golden rule. Treat everyone the way you would want to be treated. The older generation must accept that this is not the old days anymore. Servant leaders express their compassion and caring for others in an outward display as back in the old day; this would be looked down upon as a sign of weakness.

  • Chad Parker

    The servant leader is something we should all strive to be. For most people who are in law enforcement, I believe, have to have this already in you in order to do this job. We should be dedicated to help our community and each other succeed. I agree that the word “servant” should not be seen or thought of as a bad word. As a servant leader, we need to inspire and empower the people around us. We could also take note from a man called Jesus, who himself, showed us how to be the ultimate servant leader.

    • Patrick Hall

      This is true, In order to truly do this profession, you have to have a deeper or servant attitude and spirit. It goes back to the answer all new law enforcement personnel states. That they got into law enforcement to serve the people and make it better for the next generation.

  • Patrick Hall

    Great leaders unknowingly practice Servant Leadership daily. A servant leader understands the greater picture and the importance of teamwork. They know it greater to develop others to achieve over their own personal gain. Servant leaders focus more on the team concept, relationship building, active listening skill, and have empathy when faced with issues. Servant leaders are true honest caring for humanity.