Command and Staff Program

Leadership in Practice: Legacy Leadership

Replies
273
Voices
140
Dr. Mitch Javidi
Instructions:  
  1. Post a new discussion related to the topics covered in this module.  Your post needs to provide specific lessons learned with examples from this module helping you enhance your leadership capacity at work.
  2. After posting your discussion, review posts provided by other students in the class and reply to at least one of them. 
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    Kyle Turner

    Leaving a legacy, in my opinion, is less about the focus on the legacy itself but rather the building up of people around you. If you focus on leaving a lasting impression, you're likely to struggle or miss the mark. But if you focus on making the people around you better out of a genuine care and concern for them, then you will have made an impression with an impact that continues after you are gone. I personally don't feel it necessary to worry about the legacy you leave as it is a product of how you treat others and your work ethic. Focus on those two things and the legacy will take care of itself.

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      Monte Potier

      I agree whole heartily with your comments about "Legacy" and the fact that its more about how you treat others. All of mentors was more focused on "doing the right thing" than the impressions.

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      Frank Acuna

      Very well put Kyle. Your legacy is not something you actively work to shape or mold. Your legacy will be your impact on the agency and those whom you influenced along the way.

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        Jarvis Mayfield

        I agree because in the work place if you are know for doing a good job that when you leave that's what they will say about you. I believe that your legacy if who you are. If you are a person known for good work and being polite then that's you legacy.

        I agree

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      Nancy Franklin

      Kyle, I agree that teaching and mentoring others is key to organizational succession planning. This is how we create legacy. I too believe that you will gain respect and become a more effective leader by taking the time to display genuine care for others and in helping others accurate their learning.

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        Paul Brignac III

        I feel the same. In my opinion other people sharing stories about you, and how you treated them, helps shape your legacy. Mentoring someone will usually result in that person sharing with others the story of you taking the time and making the effort to help them.

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      clouatre_kj@jpso.com

      Perfectly stated, Kyle. Leaving a legacy will happen naturally if you are the type of leader that others will want to imitate.

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      Eduardo Palomares

      Hello Kyle. Yes, indeed. Leaving a legacy in our agencies is about people remembering you for being a person of good character. When we put others first, we leave a long lasting positive impression that will carry on. If a leader looks for personal gratification, he or she has the wrong intentions. After all, people will remember you for your good actions, and how you made them feel.

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      Major Willie Stewart

      Kyle I think one of the most important things we do as leaders is build people and the organization. I feel having a longevity plan for future growth and development is something a legacy leader should be concerned with. Planning and seeing growth for years to come will leave a long impression on a department and can to continue to have a positive impact.

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      I agree that building a legacy is more so the impression you leave on people. It isn't so much about what you did but how you went about doing it. People are going to remember how they were treated during something that effected them versus what you did.

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      This may be the most replied to post I've noticed and rightfully so. Very well stated. Some of the greatest leaders have been exactly that...genuine in their caring and concern. Even when corrections are involved, someone who is genuine will be better received and the person on the other side will likely take it to heart.

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    Monte Potier

    As i viewed the video I agreed heavily on the "significant mindset" portion. I understand that sometimes putting others ahead of our own agenda can be hard, but needed to leave a legacy and to be a great leader. Feedback is also necessary, however many leaders do not want to hear constructive feedback. We all need to put our "ego's" aside for self-improvement.

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    Frank Acuna

    This lesson provides much to think about in terms of your personal impact on your organization. I can personally think back to past Chiefs of police and the legacy they left behind. I can also, however, identify legacies left behind by members of the department at every rank. One of the most influential FTO's I had will be retiring this month and he is one of the most humble men you'd ever meet. He is the type that will walk out the back door without asking for any ceremonies or fanfare for his retirement. He has impacted so many through his training, his tactics, his work ethic, and his demeanor during critical incidents. His legacy has impacted many greatly and I can personally point out some values that I learned from him. Building your legacy is important, but it is not something you will actively work to shape or form. Your legacy will be based upon those contributions you've made to your organization, the community and those whom you worked with.

    Frank

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      Brian Johnson

      Frank, you are right on point. Legacy really has nothing to do with rank or position, but how the individual lived their life on the job. We all have had great leaders and not so great leaders at every rank or position within our agency.

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        Jarod Primicerio

        Agree, as I also think back to all those I have had an opportunity to work with. So many had an immense impact on my life, both positive and negative. Thus, providing me with the decision to follow those who I want to emulate.

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      Chris Corbin

      Frank, you make a very good point. I believe that everyone, at any position in any organization, can create a legacy through virtuous living. We all know people that lead a virtuous life. When we are around them, we find ourselves drawn to them because they affect us in a positive manner and demonstrate for us the power of virtuous living.

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    Brian Johnson

    When I think of legacy makes me think about all those that have had a positive impact on my career and life. If it was for those before me that provided me with the training, experience, mentoring, and guidance, my career would not have been blessed and rewarding. For me, my legacy is to pay it forward the best way that I can. The willingness to invest in others and allow them to fulfill their dreams, aspirations, and goals. It comes down to how you influence others and will you have a positive impact on those around you. Your legacy started the first day you came on the job, for better or worse. Plan accordingly and develop daily as a leader.

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      Magda Fernandez

      Brian, I agree with your post, having positive role models who took the time to mentor, train, see things in me that I didn’t, and invest the time to help me be my best taught me a lot of valuable lessons. Some lessons were harder than others. Their influence and the way they made me feel is sill with me and I want to make sure that I can pay that forward to the new generation of officers that we have.

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      Laurie Mecum

      I agree Brian.....having leaders early on that were willing to mentor and give the time and effort to help you make all the difference. Paying it forward is the best way to go.

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      Justin Payer

      Brian, I agree. I often think of those that helped me along my way and I appreciate them. I want to leave a legacy with those behind me and want them to appreciate what I have done for them and the agency.

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    Chris Corbin

    When I consider leaders that I have worked with that are respected for having left a positive legacy, it is apparent to me that they shared one virtue in common, which is courage. That's not to say that they lacked other virtues (they certainly did not), but each of them were courageous and because of that, they always acted on their other virtues. They seemingly never failed to seize critical moments to act on their values. In the near term, each such moment served as a learning experience for others. In the long term, the series of moments that these leaders seized upon resulted in the creation of a legacy that others remembered and modeled long after they moved on.

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    Jarod Primicerio

    As a leader in my profession, I know I was provided with the opportunity to make a difference. It can be in someone's life or possibly many. Either way, I don't think much about the legacy I am leaving, rather, I lead from the heart. Make collaborative decisions that are in the best interest of the person and my department. A review of the 5 components in this module is a good reminder, but moreover, a confirmation that I am on the right track. While we will all make mistakes along the way, I am hopeful that my staff understands the true intentions.

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      Dan Wolff

      Jarod Primicerio,
      I agree that most the persons I know that would be in the Legacy Leadership status did the same thing you are doing. When it came to humility, feedback and teamwork they were top notch. I think that’s all each of us want to do is try and live up to the components identified in this module without even thinking about it and make a difference to those below us.

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      Joey Prevost

      I think we are allowed to make mistakes along the way, as long as they are in good faith. By you words, I think you likely act with others in mind. I also believe as the lecture stated, it's not how you start, but how you finish.

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        Drauzin Kinler

        Good point and I agree, as long as you take into consideration what is best for your personnel you can make mistakes along the way. It is about being a fair person, and occasionally standing up, battling some fierce opponents because it is the right thing to do.

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        Nicole Oakes

        I also agree with the comments. When we are young and immature we don't always think of leaving a legacy, but it can be very powerful as a motivator to be a good leader.

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      ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

      Excellent point. It is always a good feeling when you get confirmation you are on the right track.

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    Dan Wolff

    This module of Legacy Leadership also made me think about the past leaders I had in the military. They practiced and lived the components of a legacy leader with their mindset, relationships, aspirations, courage and succession planning. These were the leaders you wanted as a mentor and wanted to emulate. They always had the respect of those below him/her and those above. One thing for certain is that is was not something that just happened one day for them … it took time to achieve that status.

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    Joey Prevost

    I liked the opening video referring to the analogy of wet concrete. Both positive and negative actions leave an impression forever. The analogy of the photo mosaic also struck me. Other people make us successful and we in turn make them successful. I have known such leaders. They had a habit of surrounding themselves with people that they deemed better than them.

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      Jason Porter

      I have heard many times that smart leaders have smarter people under them. If you have smart and successful people surrounding you, then you will in turn be looked at as a good leader. Coaching your team to be leaders will only help you fulfill your desire to become a good leader as well.

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      Lance Leblanc

      Joey, I too know leaders that are weak but they surround themselves, like you, said, with leaders that are better than they are. This one leader I am a thing of always had the best around him so they would carry him, but he was continuously learning and improving.

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      Brian Lewis

      Joey, the wet concrete analogy stuck with me too. Unfortunately, you can leave 100 good impressions, but you are remembered for the one bad impression. If you catch it before the concrete dries, you might be able to fix it in time.

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    Jason Porter

    This module spoke about leaving a legacy of leadership with your agency. I can still remember the supervisor that I had when I first came on line. He was an ex-military man. He was a teacher, a listener, and a disciplinarian if need be. He ran his shift like a team, I didn't realize that until later on in my career. He had a profound impact on my career, I still try to emulate him and his way of leading. Leaving the agency better than when I or he was here is something that I constantly think about. What can I do to make things better? I ask that constantly, small steps to leave a big imprint later on.

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      Lt. Mark Lyons

      My story is very similar. I am glad I had the opportunity to work for a supervisor who was a legacy leader before he retired. Even though I spent less time working for him than I have others, I learned more under his leadership. He taught me more than what was outlined in training manuals. The lessons I learned from him early in my career were about being your self and applying your values in how you treated others. He taught me to stay grounded and to avoid becoming overbearing or too friendly. He opened my eyes to how an officer should conduct themselves. He had a lot of "common sense wisdom". He had the ability to make even the most complicated situations seem simple.

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    Drauzin Kinler

    Leaving a good legacy behind is essential in the role of being a leader. Looking back at my career, I remember those that have left a positive impact on my life and role as a leader. My goal is to leave a legacy behind that will reflect the loyalty, dedication, and service that I have provided to the personnel that worked with me over the years. Although some may not have liked my techniques, there best interest and well-being was always put first. I always stood up for my subordinates and fought some fierce battles for them because it was the right thing to do. My subordinates have been and will continue to be provided the opportunity for them to succeed. If they do not succeed, it will be because of their choices and decisions, not as a result of my leadership.

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      dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

      Personally speaking, I give you credit for where I am today. You showed me how to do things the St. Charles way and how to be successful at doing it. I came here as a barley 21-year-old, working for you in patrol and although you were tough, you were always fair with me and honest. I wouldn't change a thing about how things unfolded back then, because I believe there are a reflection up what I consider a successful career so far. Thank you.

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    Mike Brown

    Leaving a good legacy should be important and your success as a supervisor should count for something. But I have not seen the legacy of any officer who has left the department be recognized. In my opinion once your gone your gone..

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    Nancy Franklin

    This lecture was a great reminder of the importance of futuristic thinking and the value of coming from a mindset of legacy. We must continue to assess and implement ways that we can leave our organizations in a better place than when we entered...this is accomplished by taking the time to teach and develop others around you. A leader cannot expect to gain a following merely by the position they hold. This lecture reminded us that "people follow people...not the position." We must remember to reach back and pull others up with us, as it takes teamwork to achieve organizational excellence.

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    Lance Leblanc

    The legacy you leave should be extremely important to you as a supervisor. We all have that one supervisor that stands out, that we try to mimic their supervision. We all remember him because of the positive legacy he left. There is also the legacy left by poor supervisors, which officers will always remember.

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      David Cupit

      I agree with you Lance, i have a few good supervisors and some bad ones i remember as well. They each hold a memory in my mind and so i would say to me that is the legacy they left in my memories. I will try daily to do better and not be that bad supervisor.

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      Chasity Arwood

      Lance, you are right, we all that one supervisor that we want to mimic. There is usually only a few good ones and the rest have left no positive influence on the employees or the department.

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      Lance Landry

      As soon as I read your post I had “that one supervisor” stand out in my mind. He has been such a huge inspiration to me throughout my career. I find myself today in situations asking “what would he do in this situation?”

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    Magda Fernandez

    Looking at the legacy leadership concepts it is a good reminder to always think about our own mindset. It is all about putting people ahead of ourselves and knowing what our own strengths and weaknesses are within ourselves. We should always be striving to mentor people as much as being mentored ourselves. As leaders we have a lot of influence, but we will never be able to influence people if we do not develop and foster relationships both internally and externally. All of this leads to our own credibility and trust with our people and our community. They are the ones who will support and want to work to accomplish our vision or any goals that we may have. The way we leave people feeling is the way they will remember us and that will be our legacy.

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    David Cupit

    Very good module on legacy leadership it needs to be taught in basic class, so we can get an early start like was taught in this lecture. Keeping your moral standards high and sticking to your values is always a great idea. When i am teaching someone i always tell them no matter what remember the values you have learned.

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      Judith Estorge

      David,

      I agree being taught at the beginning of our career but also believe it should be taught throughout our careers. There are many examples within our agency where we can see where the leader failed instead of taking the right path. A reminder of what a legacy leader is would be beneficial to those headed down the wrong path.

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    Chasity Arwood

    Legacy should be very important for all supervisors. As Leaders, we should mentor those under our command and prepare them to become the future leaders of our agency by passing along our morals and values.

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      Clint Patterson

      Your right Chasity, legacy should be significant to supervisors. The ability to make positive changes in the agency and within the personnel that last a lifetime with them should be enough to motivate us to leave our legacy behind.

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    Brian Lewis

    Of the 5 components of legacy leadership that resonated with me was relationships. I have always had a serious persona while on-duty and that has carried over to my position in management. Many times I have been asked why I am so serious or if I'm in a bad mood. This perception of me is because I have failed to build relationships within the walls of my department. Once I recognized this, I make it a point to go out of my way to engage others, especially the non-sworn staff. This drastically improved my relationships with my co-workers and has made me more approachable.

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    Judith Estorge

    The legacy leadership module was one I enjoyed quite a bit. I see the importance of leaving an organization better than how I found it. There are areas within my career where I can see my influence on our agency and be very proud of that. Mentoring officers is a work in progress for me but an area I am willing to pursue.

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    Clint Patterson

    The module on legacy leadership was inspiring and enjoyable. I enjoyed reflecting on past supervisors that made impacts on my career and life. I can honestly say that I have taken a little portion of each of their leadership skills and found ways to merge them into my style of leadership. As most of us are probably well into our careers and looking toward retirement, we really should be looking forward to leaving our legacy. It will be a good feeling to know that the people we are leading now will remember us and our legacy, well after we are gone

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      David Ehrmann

      I have done the same. I have learned from good and bad leaders. I also reflected on past leaders and realized that at the time, even though I didn’t agree with their tactics, I realized they had my best interest in mind. I also reflected on the leaders that I supervised and the things I learned from them. Hoping I left a positive influence. When we go, it’s up to others to take over. We just want to leave the best legacy possible to know we made some sort of difference that could set the stage for the people who take the reins from us to take what we did to even better heights.

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      Rocco Dominic, III

      So true Clint,
      incorporating each of their skills into our own style is a good way to build our legacy as well as carry on the legacy of those before us.

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      Samantha Reps

      I agree, this lesson was a great reflection on what I have learned from every leader that I have had. I think we are all wanting the best for our agency and we hope that what we are doing will better the organization.

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    Laurie Mecum

    The legacy leadership module made me reflect on some of the past leaders I had. Some were not so great, however, that was also a learning experience for me as for how I did NOT want to be. The one leader that always stands out to me had the mentor quality. I think that is important when passing on information and doing succession planning.

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      Donnie

      I found what you are talking about more prevalent during my military career. I latched on to a leader that helped me design my own likeable yet disciplined style. Finding the right mentor can help you lead in other places. I discovered this to be true when I entered law enforcement.

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    Amanda Pertuis

    This module has caused me to self-reflect. What stands out the most are the 3 Essential Concepts of Legacy Leadership. I agree with all of them. The 5 components of legacy leadership were very informative.

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    David Ehrmann

    This is an interesting concept leaders within organizations need to be aware of. I have seen some leaders who prepare their constituents to take the reins when it’s there time to go. However, I have seen others who are self-serving and feel as though if they train others to do their job, their job would be in jeopardy. I have also seen “leaders” who want the best for themselves, the best equipment, and or the best vehicles, but don’t think about what their people, who are doing the grunt work day in and day out, have or need. Credible leaders will gain respect by putting others first, which, in turn, will make the leader a more valuable asset to the organization.

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    Roanne Sampson

    Legacy leadership was very informing. It is important to leave a legacy in your organization. I enjoyed learning about the five components of legacy leadership (relationships, aspirations, courage, success and having a significant mindset). We have to look at the future. My team and I have done a lot of great things for our community. We are constantly evolving. We make a difference. This brings enthusiasm into the work place.

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      Christian Johnson

      I agree, Roanne.

      Keep doing what you do to make a difference and you will be remembered fondly as someone that truly cared about others and the community.

      I can think of no better legacy to leave behind.

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      The past years I have spent learning from personnel has been advantageous. I feel that I have not embraced what I could have learned as a younger officer. We must strive to teach our fellow LEOS even if they resist change or wisdom. When we can connect and teach what we have learned from experience, it can help to cull future mistakes.

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    Christian Johnson

    This module made me think of leaders I've served that are now gone, either to other divisions or retired, as well as myself.

    I have seen good and bad leaders, but have made it a point to learn from them all. I have had leaders that left a positive legacy behind and those that most cannot remember at all.

    While I certainly want to be remembered in a positive way, I have never consciously thought about my personal legacy. I love to help people grow, teach and get others to the positions they want most. I believe that by doing those things, my legacy will be a good one.

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      Royce Starring

      I agree. I worked under a few bad leaders which I have learned from in order to improve my leadership qualities.

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      dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

      Correct take away the away from good leaders that will help you improve. Additionally you need to learn what not to do from the bad leaders. Those two will make you a better leader.

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    Rocco Dominic, III

    This module makes me think of how others will see me when I retire. Did I do a good job, did I make a lasting impression on someone or did I inspire someone to want to be better. Far to often you will hear people talk about how good or bad a person was when the leave. We must all strive to make sure we leave a legacy that will help other succeed.

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    Royce Starring

    I found the concept of looking forward by looking back very interesting. You have to learn from the mistakes that you and other have made in the past in order to progress in the future.

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      Lieutenant John Champagne

      I agree with this, looking back and seeing the mistakes we made only helps us as leaders not to repeat them. This concept also applies to the leaders we have had in the past.

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    Lance Landry

    Prior to participating in this module, I never thought of Legacy Leadership in the ways Chief Blankenship described. It was always looked at subconsciously that I learned from those that came before. They were really passing on their legacy to me. This module stressed to me the importance of how I should pass the legacy on to others. Through developing a significance mindset, building relationships, developing aspirations, having courage, and outlining a succession plan, I can become a better leader worthy of leaving my own legacy.

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    Donnie

    I can remember during deployments in the military that General Orders flowed like a waterfall down to the lowest level. I can recall a lot of them not making sense causing more physical and mental effort on our part but seemed to justify a general’s job at the time. I truly believe that you should not make policies, regulations, or orders just so others can see what you did. I try to model my own style after a lieutenant I was close to because of the way his troops responded to him. If I even have a legacy to leave, I would want it to be that I understood the “Troops First, Mission Always” mantra.

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    Burke

    I have always thought about my legacy and what it would look like when I was gone. This module really made me add to that it is more about passing on the legacy to those that will take my place. That is of greater importance than the memory of your work.

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      jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

      Burke, I too have always thought of my legacy as what others will think of me when I am gone. This module help me realize that my legacy is about mentoring others and leaving behind a legacy through others. Like the module said, "don't assume anything." We as leaders must not assume we are making a difference, we must strive of make a difference and leave our organizations in better shape then we started.

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    McKinney

    I have probably mentioned it before, but I’ll repeat it, I have been fortunate to serve with credible and authentic leaders. These great leaders made a significant impact throughout the organization I serve with, and their dedication and commitment to each member will always be present for generations to come. I genuinely believe they bought into the philosophy of “leave the agency better than they or we found it."

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      cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

      I agree. I have also been fortunate enough to have great leaders along the way. I took a little bit from each one of them and kind of molded my style of leadership. I think these leaders were also trying to leave our department in better shape than they found it.

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      Looking back I think we all can identify those who embody the words that are shared in this module. Leadership can be studied, but a rare few seem to have acquired it innately. We are lucky to have been influenced by these mentors of our past.

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    jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

    This module helped me realize the importance of leading a legacy of leadership. The three concepts of looking forward by looking back, its not how you start but how you finish, and teamwork were very informative. I don't know if I ever really asked myself, "Am I worthy of imitation?" I will also try to model my own leadership with the Significance of Mindset component. Having a more serving and sacrificing mentality towards others.

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      michael-beck@lpso.net

      I also thought about the same thing, "Am I worthy of being imitated?" I have also thought about, "I hope they don't see that!" I wonder how many good attributes I have passed along to everyone I have met and hopefully they outweigh the bad.

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    Lieutenant John Champagne

    The mosaic comparison stuck with me the most. If an image would be made of me with the people I supervised or influences throughout my career, how would it look? I want to make sure that if a new officer looked at that mosaic, they would see it’s made up of leaders they respect with good moral character that serves throughout the entire law enforcement community. It is not how you start, but how you finish also hit home. I have several years to go before I finish, so I can make the adjustments needed to leave a better legacy behind.

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      anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

      I think as a leader, we should all question how would our Mosaic look. Is our picture presentable or does it need to be repainted?

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    cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

    Several things stuck with me in this module. It’s not how you start but how you finish statement along with the basketball video was a good one. Chief Blankenship talked about your life being your greatest legacy. He also stated, “Because you have one life to live give all you can.” I hope my legacy will be of a good honest leader who allowed people to also become good leaders. Hopefully, I was able to pass on what I learned from good leaders throughout my career.

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      Major Stacy Fortenberry

      Yes Craig, we must strive to give it our all every day. It is way to tempting in our last few years to just let time pass. What we do in the next few years can have long lasting implications on an organization we have devoted ourselves to.

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    Major Stacy Fortenberry

    We had a six term Sheriff and many people talked about him leaving a legacy. When I think of who shaped and mentored me therefore taught me how to mentor others who will then pass it on again it is not the past Sheriff. It is one of my old shift Lt.'s. As Blankenship pointed out the agency head is not the most influential in an organization. That role belongs to each individual first line supervisor.

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      mtroscla@tulane.edu

      I agree, I worked in a large Sheriff's office for four years, I think I met the Sheriff twice during that time. However I had many Lieutenants, Sergeants and corporals who taught me either valuable lessons or served as examples of how not to behave.

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        chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

        I agree, with a bigger department sometimes it's harder to actually see the person that is leading the flock. Sometimes that leader may not even know your name after meeting them, I've experienced this with a old department. So for that leader it's hard for them to recognize your true values and to even know you as a person.

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        guttuso_fa@jpso.com

        One of my biggest leaders as far as legacy goes was probably my two FTOs when i started my career. I think that probably is true for most of us unless you had a poor FTO. So much of what we do in our career is based off of what we learned from them.

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          sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

          I agree, what the FTO passes on and a good LT and Sgt. I remember all mine. I try to emulate them while adding my own style of leadership.

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      Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

      I agree Major, I also had very influential leaders as I was building my career in corrections. Some were great and others not so great. The ones that stood out always brought the best out of me and my coworkers. Their legacy lives on with myself and others that now are leading a more positive direction in the correctional field.

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    The significance of leaving a legacy has always been in the back of my mind. While I try to do things as best I can, many times when I stop to reflect on where I am and what direction I am going I consider what my family and friends will remember when my career is done. Many of the deputies I work with I have had the honor of helping develop since they fist joined this agency, or attended the academy where I instruct, or even as youth in the Explorer program I lead. I have done my best to be someone who leads by example. I remember when I was a DARE Officer a teacher approached me at a restaurant on evening. she said hello and then commented that I was really drinking milk with my meal. I smiled and told her of course I was. I told my students I didn't drink alcohol and I meant that. To this day when I work in the southern portion of my parish many people call me Deputy Day. Those former students are now in their late twenties and early thirties. They remember me and often tell me stories of how I positively touched their lives. I realize I have the same potential to reach the cadets and officers I am training now. I also think back to some of the influential leaders I have had in my career. My Sheriff is an inspirational leader, but my career path has followed my Major who was there to walk me through DARE and discuss the attributes of community service, dedication, and loyalty. However, the most influential leader I have ever met was Sgt. Tom Brown. Sgt. Brown never had to be told to be a leader, he just was. Many years later I base many of my decisions on how I think he would have perceived a situation. I hope I can be thought of as highly as I think of Tom. And if I can mentor and inspire younger officers the way Tom did I will have had an amazing career.

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      McKinney

      It is interesting as I read through the discussion questions that most of us are aligned with one another in our thoughts. I, too, think of what legacy I’ll leave behind, whether it is in my personal or professional life. I strive each day to leave a positive meaning to those that I am surrounded by in hopes that my message or actions will have a positive lasting impact on them.

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    michael-beck@lpso.net

    This module appears as though it will be a good lead in for the rest of the area. I enjoyed Chief Blankenship’s explanation of the 5 Components of Legacy Leadership. I have unknowingly and unwittingly attempted to practice them in the past, but never put them together to have them be fully successful. I have always taken the succession planning portion seriously since I was and FTO Deputy. I always believed that I needed to pass along as much knowledge as possible to help the recruits feel more confident in themselves and their abilities. By giving them enough freedom to make their own mistakes and find their own ways in doing things, always seemed to have positive results. I always feel a sense of pride when these men and women get promoted and I know I had something, even if it was just a little part, in their success.

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    mtroscla@tulane.edu

    While I am considerate of how my actions affect others, I had not really thought about how my legacy might be viewed. This course has opened my eyes to making decisions that do more good over a longer timeline.

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      Henry Dominguez

      Wow good point. Never really thought of how we actually do leave some sort of legacy, but what kind of legacy do we or will we leave. Definitely made me really think about my actions and attitude on making a positive change for the future and try to leave a positive leadership legacy.

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    chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

    In the learning area 3, module 2 understanding the importance of learning a legacy at your agency was a lot of information which separates the learning and leading of others. Also the learning of ways to improve legacy leadership skills for an effective succession plan was learned that major tension in an organization is the tension between freedom and restraint. As leaders we need to input from others to build success.

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    Henry Dominguez

    Leaving your own legacy that people want to follow is an honor in itself. Just like it said in the lecture, Legacy Leaders influence without asserting authority and a lasting legacy is built on principal and purpose. This is something I plan to remind myself everyday, from personal life to professional life.

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      cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

      Leaving a legacy would be amazing. It is something that I hope I can do one day. As you put it, I will work at it every day.

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      Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

      I also like the notion of influencing your followers without asserting authority. I believe that you can build a better team and legacy following when you lead and they want to follow rather than trying to force the "herd" to follow you.

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    guttuso_fa@jpso.com

    A good legacy is something i definitely want to leave behind. It is important to teach others so that they can take what you have taught them and take it to the next level. I had a mentor in my department who left his legacy on this department. I am not sure I can live up to his legacy but I intend to give it my best shot. It seems to me that the one (or two) people who leave their legacy with you is your FTO. You always seem to go back to what you learned from them, as long as it wasn't bad habits. That was not the case with my FTO. With me I had to FTOs who were on totally different ends of the spectrum. But I learned things from both of them that I still fall back on today.

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    As I think of my legacy as a chief, I not only want to have a positive legacy but not stay in my spot when I am not wanted or my time as expired. We have all seen leaders that have been in office too long, and a change is needed.

    I enjoyed the quote with its not how you start the race; it's about finishing it. I remember when I started as the chief, my agency was in shambles and did not have a positive reputation. Now we are a leader in school safety and well like by our community. I hope to have a legacy, that the kids, staff, and parents that I serve will always remember.

    Be sure to leave your own "Leadership Legacy."

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      steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

      Its like raising our children to have live and the chance to be better than what opportunities we had.

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    ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

    This section made me think back to all the legacies that have had an effect on me. There were many good points brought out and they gave me a renewed sense of mission and vision. This will definitely have a positive impact on the actions I take from this point forward.

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    cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

    Leaving a lasting legacy for your organization is an amazing thing. Improving your legacy leadership skills is something to work at every day so that we can build the relationships need to leave the legacy for the future leaders of the organization.

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    sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

    I had the opportunity to learn from some great leaders and i still use what i was taught. That's their legacy, me passing on what they taught. Its when some leaders make a 180 and aren't the same as when they taught you. I don't plan on making that mistake with my legacy.

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    anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

    In my career, my legacy is the one thing I have total control of, and leaving a good legacy helps me to know all my years of service was not in vain. when I'm retired it will feel good to know that officers I had a part in training and leading, can carry the organization into the future.

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      dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

      It is also a good feeling that when you see these officers you helped train that the respect they have for you emanates from their non-verbal body language.

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    Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

    The legacy leadership mentality is a model I believe we are all striving for within our respective agencies. I personally look back and see the different legacy left before me, some good...and some bad. I am striving to make sure that I do my best to leave this agency in a better place when I leave than the way I found it. The points made in this lesson about mentoring, teaching leadership skills, and letting our leads are all great steps to solidifying a great legacy.

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    dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

    Officers should be able to feel like they can speak their minds in order to change something that isn’t working or come up with an idea that could benefit the department. Many agencies empower their people to be free thinkers. Leaving something better than they found it should be every officer’s attitude towards something they have a passion for.

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      cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree that all employees should be able to give honest and constructive feedback that could benefit the department. Just like sincere and honest feedback is essential for individual development, it should also be fostered for organizational development. How can we improve if we don't know what we are doing wrong?

      We can't continuously improve without fostering respect, trust and truthfulness.

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    dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

    My biggest takeaway from this is succession planning. Honestly, before ICLD I had never given it much thought. Because of that training a few years ago, I have strived to do just that. Since I started this course, a few weeks ago, this has been my only focus. I turned all of the day to day operations of the Criminal Investigations Division over to the sergeant in my division and it hasn't missed a beat. I have full confidence in him, that he can handle every aspect of leading the division and so far I have been proven right. It has definitely relieved stress off of me during this time. Just this morning I told him if things were getting to be too much for just him to handle, to turn over some of the responsibilities to the two senior detectives, to start grooming them for supervisor positions. I know specific supervisors, who will micromanage and not allow the sergeant under them, much less detectives take on responsibilities, because they are self-serving and insecure. I am fortunate to have not had any leaders like that in my command that I can recall.

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      blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

      I have done the same to my supervisor and officers. We still have our weekly meetings to keep the communication lines open. They have been doing a great job without me, and it helps me tremendously while doing this course.

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    blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

    I strive to leave a legacy that is better than the legacy that my mentor left to me when I became the commander of the canine division. I teach the people under my command the knowledge that I have about the canine division, so that they can have a foundation to build on as they learn new techniques and ideas from other people. Law enforcement is about learning and evolving to change that takes place around us. As the module stated, we are only as good as the people that we lead.

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    steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

    I enjoyed the information on proving succession with teach others to be leaders in our absence. I always try to teach my team to be able to make decisions on their own. This allows them to become leaders with knowledge and confidence when its their turn to step up to the calling. I found it interesting about the survey use, and remember that about 8-10 years ago I used survey monkey with my team at the time to get honest feed back on many aspects of our team. It was very helpful and I think I will employ this again with the new team.

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      Adam Gonzalez

      Thank you for this post. I to chose mentoring or teaching others in our absence as you stated. One saying that I use among my ranks is to bring me not just the problem, but your thought out solution. Like the child that is redirected to the dictionary when he/she asks the question of what a word means, I am more than happy to discuss solutions all day. I just ask that one does a little homework first so that they can learn confidence and solutions on their own and prepare to execute those decisions on their own as well.

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    cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

    In discussing the five components of Legacy Leadership (Significance of Mindset, Relationships, Aspirations, Courage, and Succession Planning), the section on relationships seemed to resonate the most with me. Chief Blankenship advised “being likable is truly about being respected by their peers.” This made me reflect on so many supervisors within our agency and others. When they leave, will they be liked or respected? Will I?

    One saying I’ve personally said is “we are here to do a job and not necessarily to be friends”, yet I truly believe we can still do our job with compassion and still be well-liked and respected.

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      dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree with you, Cheryl. This module has made me reflect on the type of leader I am and what I will leave behind. Hopefully, I can still do my job and be well-liked.

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      It is funny that many do feel they are there to do a job and not be friends. The problem is they cannot figure out how to be friendly either. So many leaders feel they have to treat people like a subordinate and forget how to treat them with dignity, and respect. They lose their people before they even had a chance to lead them.

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    dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

    I learned a lot in this module when it comes to legacy leadership. I think this is something that certain leaders lose sight of in their careers. Legacy leadership is something I will focus on in the future.

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        I also agree that some leaders inside my agency have also forgotten about leaving a legacy and have shifted their focus to themselves. When I finish my career I want people to talk about me for years and it be about the ways I changed the agency for the better and not that I only looked out for myself.

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          mmoscona@floodauthority.org

          I have thought about my legacy as most of us have. But I guess I never thought about the steps I could take to create Legacy Leadership. With the knowledge gained from this module I can see where I can make some improvements. I love the passage "it's not how you start but how you finish" I'm far closer to the finish than the start but there is still time to enhance my legacy.

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      wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

      I agree in my organization leaders lose sight. For my organization to grow I will create a balance of proper evaluations and precise and timely feedback so my organization could grow in the right direction.

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    In our agency, I think we need to develop more leaders that will leave a legacy. Unfortunately, we still have people that are in a leadership role that are selfish and do not value the thoughts of their followers. I often remind leadership in my department the importance of succession planning. I'm working on building an environment where all personnel view themselves as a leader.

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    clouatre_kj@jpso.com

    I really connected with the statement that Chief Blankenship said at the very beginning of the module - "One person in pursuit of excellence raises the level of excellence for all of those around you." The five components of Legacy Leadership were well laid out and easily understood. Another quote from Chief Blankenship that I will hang on to is "If you have a leader that does not want to be liked, fire him." Makes perfect sense when you think about being liked really means you want others to treat us with dignity and respect. Leaders should all want that.

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    Adam Gonzalez

    The three concepts of legacy leadership put in perspective for me, the need to keep growing as leaders of today, while growing those leaders for tomorrow. Mentoring perhaps is the best way to do this. I have found it to be true in my experience that those that sincerely wish to move forward, both themselves professionally and the organization itself, seek out ways to learn how best to do so. Mentoring those that are honestly seeking the best ways to better themselves is arguably the most optimal way to extend one's arm in service to those closest around you. This is also one way to extend one's legacy within the agency.

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    dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

    This module made think about all the new hires that come through our agency and how important it is to impress upon them the correct virtues and teamwork. i have constant interaction with these people for the first two years of their career and it is important to make sure that my legacy transfers with them through their career. Getting them started on the correct footing by showing them the right way.

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    As leaders, we all want to leave a positive and lasting legacy. It is important that we teach the younger generation of officers the importance of hard work and dedication. This module provided a guide to understand what is needed to build a legacy and to ensure your legacy is carried on years after our retirement.

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      I have always thought that this would be my only legacy, the training of younger and fellow officers. I have always considered that being there to train them and mentor them was sufficient. For most of us in law enforcement, if we can say this, then we have made our agency better.

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      I agree, a great leader should plan for a future without them. They need to take stock in those around them, recognize the future leaders, and begin training them. Don't wait until your almost gone to start the process!!

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      Durand Ackman

      It is crazy to think of our legacy being carried on for years after retirement but then I remember how frequently names come up that haven't been with the organization for at least a decade. Some of these conversations are positive, others are negative. Every time I have that thought I remind myself I need to do things to ensure I am leaving a positive legacy that will live on. I am fine with my name coming up in regards to lessons learned but I would hate for the majority of conversations about my time in the organization being negative.

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        Christopher Lowrie

        I agree. I have heard too many bad stories about retired folk and not enough positive ones. I do not want to leave a negative legacy behind. I plan to leave the department in a better place than I found it.

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    Lt. Mark Lyons

    I believe most people want to leave a legacy and be known for their accomplishments or contributions. Individuals who have the mindset of a "legacy leader" most likely wont admit it, but I believe its human nature to want to be recognized and appreciated for your hard work and effort. I like how the instructor defined the five components to legacy leadership. This training module gives me a lot of good information to reference when conducting training with our supervisors.

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    The lecture material presents some good reasons to preserve and have a legacy. This is in contrast to what many of us have seen, in the past. From personal experience, I have seen many leaders spend too much time crafting their legacy. They want to be legends, like others that they have seen. Too many times, they are dictatorial when it comes to preserving that legacy, or as has been said, "Believe their own press."

    This material shows leaders a road map to leaving a true legacy for the future and their agency that is a true legacy. We, as leaders, have to strive to accomplish this, so the good that we do for our agency and fellow man are not forgotten.

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    This module speaks to me on how to build a road-map to leave a lasting impression for your respective agency. We need to foster growth and implement positive changes where we are employed. We need to create an indelible legacy for our future leaders and invest in our current personnel. We are tasked with teaching our co-workers with our respective disciplines and learning from each other.

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      Joseph Flavin

      The road-map is a great analogy for lessons learned in this module. We are seeing the steps needed to leave that lasting impression. Investing in our current personnel will also help with retention as well as building future leaders that can pick up where we left off and continue to carve their own path through the agency.

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    wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

    Being a leader of leaders is not about staying in your comfort zone. It is about building leaders and being able to provide them with support. Most leaders will not ask their evaluator for help until they can trust them to present their challenges to directly. It is necessary to provide this feedback, so they can expand and grow as leaders.

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    Legacy building is so important. I, for one, am so tired of doing things just because it is the way they have always been done. As leaders, we should be looking to improve the climate and leave a guided path into the future. We may set the trends, but those in the future will have to adhere to them. If we have selected the next generations of leaders wisely, they will then look to set future trends. I am happy to say that I authored and co-authored two pieces of policy that are strictly for the benefit of the employees. When I am long gone, I know those will continue to affect my department positively.

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    Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

    Some leaders use intimidation over inspiration when it comes to leading others. When I was a deputy, I witnessed other deputies not speak up due to being afraid to voice an opinion. That resonated in me. I made a conscious effort as I applied myself into becoming a leader to not allow my team members to be fearful of me. I am a very open and honest leader. I accept and want all feedback from them. As I explain to my team members, you are only as great as you allow yourself to be.

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      Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

      This is still true, I find myself answering why the moral is so bad when our leaders have bad attitudes. I work hard everyday to even the odds by staying positive and giving respect and allowing them to have opinions. Asking the deputies how can we make the work load easier and safe lets them know their opinions count.

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      Mitchell Gahler

      Your positive effort as you develop into a positive leader will not go unnoticed. I think it's great that you observed that behavior, then implemented it into your own leadership style. Others will definitely respect you far greater for how you are applying yourself. Others should not have to feel afraid to voice their opinions or being paranoid for possibly doing the wrong thing. Good work!!

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      James Schueller

      I also witnessed the two different forms of leadership coming up. It's so true that you learn just as much from the poor leaders as you do from the good. I try very hard to be collaborative and find that I continue to learn by doing so. I think that's why I enjoy teaching so much (for my department and for the Law Enforcement program at our local college)- you never stop learning and you never know when and who can teach you something.

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      Eric Sathers

      I agree. All too often in our profession, we experience supervisors who lead with a close-minded mentality. They not only refuse to hear feedback but get downright offended by it and often retaliate against those who have the courage to speak up.

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    Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

    Legacy Leadership

    As I watch this module, my mind reflect back to some of the leaders I worked under several were great leaders, and other were not. Some of the leaders I came behind are retied, or still employed with the agency but working in different departments.
    I have learned from both superior and poor leaders. I was able to gain knowledge and benefit from those significant leaders. I watched how they handled situations. The relationships they established with their personnel and the public. I would like to be recognized as a good leader. Being a Watch Commander, I display to my subordinates that I am humble, fair and trustworthy. Some supervisors excels to the position of a leader but refuse to lead. When my time comes for retirement, I would hope that my leadership is remembered just as I remember and admire the leaders I was able to mimic throughout my career advancement.

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    Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

    I like the saying to leave the department in a better place than where you found it resonates with me. I have strived to do right by my co-workers and the department; however, I was not always successful. I believe if you treat people with respect, dignity, and teach them how to better themselves, you have become a legacy leader.

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      Lt. Marlon J Shuff

      Richie, that sums it up. Follow the Golden Rule of treating others as you want to be treated and leave the place a little better than you found it.

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    Lt. Marlon J Shuff

    I thought this was an excellent, thought-provoking module. The John Maxwell quote, “Success is when I add value to myself; significance is when I add value to others,” pretty much sums up what leaving a legacy means. Some of my most memorable leaders, throughout my military and law enforcement careers, have been those who have brought out the best in me. It was never about them. They were genuine servant leaders who always had the best interest of their men in mind.

    Chief Blankenship mentioned teaching others, which I believe is an essential component of legacy. Throughout my career, sharing knowledge through instructing has been something that I have been passionate about. Passing on expertise or teaching someone a skill that could save their lives will remain with them long after you are retired.

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      I agree with your statements and really keyed in on sharing knowledge through instruction can teach and mentor others and can also develop you as a leader. When I was training Sergeant for three years and had the opportunity to teach others it really helped me grow as a leader. It increased my communication skills and helped me identify areas where I was lacking. It instilled confidence and helped me developed my mentoring skills.

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      John Maxwell's quote is a heavy-hitter. We would all do well to remember that one in almost everything we do. Being a servant leader sometimes includes showing those the path they do not see before them. As we get older, I think we get better at recognizing others' strengths and weaknesses, especially in the younger generation, so that we may teach them about what we see in them, truly leading them to become the best they can be.

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    Mitchell Gahler

    In the module, Legacy Leadership, Blankenship discussed the five components of Legacy Leadership in order to develop relationships. These components could not have been described any better. Blankenship stated, “Building a solid legacy requires us to understand who we really are instead of what we as leaders do.” It is important to remain humble and true to yourself in order to be successful. Your attitude and behaviors should not change due to your success. It’s important to teach leadership as we grow as leaders ourselves. Develop a legacy in your position, and others will respect you and treat you with dignity and respect. Treat others the way you want to be treated.

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    Joseph Flavin

    I really enjoyed this lesson on Legacy Leadership. It's important that we as leaders understand the 5 components of legacy leadership; s significance mindset, relationships, aspirations, courage, and succession planning. Blankenship said it best, "People follow people, not positions." This was the first time I had heard anyone equate being likeable to being respectable. All of the components are key to legacy leadership and I will take what I learned from succession planning and incorporate that to my current position.

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      Ryan Manguson

      I also like what Blankenship had to say that people perform better for those who treat them with dignity and respect. Very , very, true from my experience.

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    I liked the analogy of the photo mosaic and felt that it had a lot of hidden messages. A mosaic is typically a photo of somebody with pictures of others or articles in the background. Typically those in the background are there because they contributed to the success of the person featured in the mosaic. If we think of it in terms of success we think of it as using others to contribute to our success but in doing that making others successful. So I see the overall message as use the strengths of others and in doing that through positive reinforcement and encouragement you develop their skills and success as well.

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    James Schueller

    I took a lot from Component #1, specifically the discussion/definitions of significance being a mindset- Success is when I add value to myself, significance is when I add value to others. I think that one piece best sums up this module. In addition, the last two pieces of Component # 1 also resonated along the same lines. Leaders closest to us have the most influence over us, and it's everyone's responsibility to to leave a legacy. Both are powerful statements that add to the success and significance definitions. I also think those are important because they show how our day to day actions fulfill the definitions, both good and bad... Often it's not one shining moment or event that define us, it's how we are every day.

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    Kyle Phillips

    The take away for me with this module is that our legacy begins with us, everyday, in our actions and how we treat people. As we strive for excellence, we inspire excellence in others.

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      Chad Blanchette

      We perform better for those that treat us with dignity and respect..... This is very true. These go hand in hand and are mirrored back on the leadership and likely on our work product.

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    Eduardo Palomares

    In terms of leaving a legacy it is about making an impression that will make others remember you in a positive light. Leaving a legacy is not only about being a great cop but is about knowing how to treat others in addition to being a great cop. Our actions from the past will speak for ourselves in the future. I reflected on many previous leaders that left a legacy at my previous and current agency. The common denominator was their ability to treat people with the outmost respect and showed empathy for their people. They brought value to their troops and encouraged a family environment and made the job fun. They relied on referent power to bring change to the institution, making great improvements and instituted programs.

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    Chad Blanchette

    One of my favorite messages from Chief Blankenship is “Grace is getting something we don't deserve and Mercy is not getting something we do deserve. Our work environments need more both. Excessive pride is the poison of our lives, and can only be treated with the antidote of humility, grace, and mercy.”

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      Paul Gronholz

      Excellent quote and something that is in short supply within organizations. Humility needs to be seen as one of the most valued characteristics of every leader at every position in the department.

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    Ryan Manguson

    This was another good module to add understanding to the significance of Legacy Leadership. I really saw value in the definition between being successful and being significant as described in component #1. You are successful if when you add value to your self. You are significate when you add value to others. That is one of the biggest takeaway I had from this module. Also, that your legacy leadership will be remembered by how you made people feel and not necessarily on what you had done.

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      Andy Opperman

      It is funny how I think most of us start our career under the belief that adding value to our selves improves our career. As we mature though we realize the true character of a leader is related to adding value to others and helping them succeed. The statement that you become significant when you show the ability to make other succeed is spot on.

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      Gregory Hutchins

      Legacy, and leaving the right one, has always revolved around one's name. When one retires or dies in service, what will people say about this person? How will one's child, who aspires to follow in one's footsteps, be treated once people know he is one's child? Will they say, "I hope he is not like his father," "Or I hope he is half the officer his father was." The other mechanism that drives my strong desire always to do my best is what does my namesake, my father, think as he looks down on me from heaven?

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    Paul Gronholz

    Leaving a legacy of humility, teamwork, putting others above myself is something that I've worked to create since I was hired as an officer. Unfortunately, I have not always done a great job at that. I appreciated that this module to refocus my efforts at doing that. I want to be part of the culture at RPD that values the feedback, insight, and ideas that every officer provides to this department.

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    Durand Ackman

    I have to assume everybody wants to leave a positive legacy. Unfortunately we all have our flaws and negatives tend to be remembered easier than positives. That is why we need to work hard to ensure we are leaving a positive wake as we progress through our career. The mosaic was an interesting concept that made sense as well as the difference between adding value to myself vs others.

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      Ryan Lodermeier

      I agree Durand, I like the mosaic concept as well. We have all worked with those LEOs who when they retire people immediately reflect up on their legacy…some are positive, some are not. It goes back to the concept of adding value to our agency and leaving it better than when we joined.

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      Maja Donohue

      I can’t say that I have ever used the same terminology as Chief Blankenship (mosaic) but I have on occasion thought about the people who made a positive impact on me over the years. It’s interesting, because I can list people in all ranks of our organization who have made me into the person I am today. And for that, I am very grateful. This lecture confirmed for me that we influence each other, whether we are aware of it or not, regardless of our title.

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    Ryan Lodermeier

    This module was summed up best when Chief Blankenship stated that we all want to leave our agency better than when we found it. This portion that really stuck out to me was to allow everyone the opportunity for open and honest communication. Again, we have to put our thoughts and opinions aside and let others speak freely on what their thoughts and ideas are.

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    Christopher Lowrie

    This was a great reminder on remembering to stay professional. People in our organizations and the community are watching us on and off duty. If we raise our standards others around us should raise theirs as well.

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      Christopher touched on an important point. As leaders, we are being watched all the time. How we dress, how we act, how we respond to crisis is being observed by others. Sometimes we are blissfully ignorant of the impact we can have for others. a supervisor once commented to me how appreciative he was that I always had a calm demeanor when dealing with people and situations. The sergeant went on to say that he always knew how I was going to respond if he ever had to bring a tough problem to my attention. This was a reminder to never forget that people pay attention to everything good and not so good that we do.

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      always!

      Groups always take on the personality of their leader. I've seen this to be true in the military and in law enforcement. If i want my peoples to act a certain way or operate at a certain level, then I must model that behavior.

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    I now have a different opinion on what leaving a legacy means. Prior to this presentation, I always thought that focusing on leaving a legacy was selfish and was a distraction from the here and now. This could not be further from the truth. two things that Chief Blankenship said really stuck with me.. "to leave a legacy of excellence we strive to be the best everyday" and " "as you strive for excellence you inspire excellence in others". It is easy to get bogged down in day to day matters. This leads to stagnation. If you can feel it, your staff can feel it. The three concepts of legacy leadership that Chief Blankenship discussed are important as well. Being able to look back allows an organization and leader evaluate their successes and failures and make timely course corrections. This not only reminds everyone of their purpose but it sets the stage for future success. The second point regarding the importance of never forgetting it's about how you finish, is all about mindset. Winning teams and organizations who are not prepared for adversity, sometimes fall flat in the end. We have seen this time and time again in sporting events. The team that is destined to win suffers a setback that they can't seem to overcome and the underdog wins. Practice, preparation and adaptability pay off. The last point about teamwork cannot be understated. There is always a myriad of things that take place behind the scenes of every great success or failure. It is up to the leader to manage this chaos and recognize team member contributions. This means being able to maximize the leaders personal attributes and the abilities of other team members.

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    Samantha Reps

    This learning lesson has great learning concepts and skills to think about. The three concepts of legacy leadership they mentioned are looking forward by looking back, it's not how you start but how you finish and teamwork are great things to look at and start figuring out about yourself. I thought it was interesting in the reference of the photo mosaic and I can't help but self reflect on what mine would look like.

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    Maja Donohue

    Chief Blankenship said that: “legacy leadership is about taking people to places they have never been before.” You see, our role is to believe in others and to encourage them to become leaders in their own right, even if they don’t believe in themselves. Legacy leadership requires moral courage, significance of mindset, relationships, aspirations, and succession planning. The theme that permeates all five of these components for me is a selfless pursuit of excellence. When the team succeeds, we all succeed and when you do things right, people will look up to you and they will feel like they matter too. Legacy leadership is about teaching leadership and letting others lead. It’s about leveraging people’s strengths, mentoring, upholding our values and treating people with dignity, respect and trust.

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      A quick example of your point of taking people where they've never been. I had a deputy who you would never think would advance past his current role in the office. I was able to set him on a self-improvement path that involved working with an outside facilitator to help him see his weaknesses and turn them into positive ones. I also put him on the past of ICLD and he ultimately finished the entire program. He was just promoted to Sergeant. I think I was able to take him out of his comfort area and showed him things most never would have believed he'd participate in let alone succeed. We can do this for people, we just have to look and have courage.

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    Chief Blankenship’s module reminded me about the importance of living the moral compass. Each of the five pillars (significance, relationships, aspiration, courage and succession planning) revolve around inherent qualities of the virtues outlined. It is our responsibility to lead by example, living a life of high moral character and to “make others feel encouraged, confident and capable” of doing the same. When we hold each other accountable to that standard, I believe not only will we gain the trust and respect of those we lead, but the community in which we all serve, as well.

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    Jennifer Hodgman

    This learning areas served as a great reminder that our leadership is always on display. Our legacy is something that follows us from day one, it enters the room before we do. As a supervisor, people who transfer to my unit will ask other officers how I am as a supervisor, my legacy is what drives that discussion. Developing our leadership legacy is dependent on our ability to seek out feedback and build trusting relationships. We should all strive to be the person that people want to work for!

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      Kelly Lee

      Agreed Lieutenant, we all must strive to be ethical and credible leaders each and every day outside of work as well as inside. One of former Sheriff's told me that he would never go to town wearing old ratty clothes or such because he was known to almost everyone, you never know who you are going to run into, you are always in public view. It's ALL about perception!

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      Jacqueline Dahms

      I agree with you completely Lieutenant! Our ability to foster relationships, stay true to our values and having courage very much influences our legacy. I would much rather have people come to me than be forced to follow me.

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    Major Willie Stewart

    Legacy leaders are usually selfless leaders that think about others and the organization. When we think about legacy leaders, we should think about those who are role models that are in pursuit of excellence. Being a good leader is one who wants and desires to leave an ever lasting impression that can last a lifetime. One who wants to leave their legacy on others go above and beyond the ability to influence others and influence positive change for the betterment of them and the organization. Legacy leadership includes the characteristics of compassion, connection and core values. Often legacy leaders arise during the most challenging times. Those in leadership positions should often be compassion and care for others. In some circumstances these leaders may be seen as weak. In this module, Chief Blankenship reminds us that a legacy leader’s actions will speak louder than words.

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      I like how you put that Wille. Leaders should always be after excellence and we should demand that of those within our sphere of influence. When we reach excellent, I think raising the bar to a new excellent is the next best thing to do otherwise we risk complacency. Also, strive for more, teach what we know through mentoring and empower people to make decisions. This is how we can cultivate leaders.

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    Kelly Lee

    Great learning area that makes me want to ask for more. Very simple, straight forward thinking for all of us and the organization to succeed. At this point we've come along way in our modules but I think Chief Blankenships's 5 legacy leadership components 1) Significance Mindset, 2) Relationships, 3) Aspirations, 4) Courage and 5) Succession Planning really narrows it down to the basics and fundamentals. It doesn't need to be any more involved or complicated than his 5 components which seem quite easy to follow. The one hitting home closest for me is #5 and succession planning. I think sometimes leaders within an organization become so fixated on themselves and what "good they are doing" that they forget to think about the future and who and what comes next. The question is certainly being kicked around in my department right now....

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      Timothy Sandlin

      I agree. It is often easy for a leader to get wrapped up themselves and focus on what "they" are doing. Humility and sacrifice. Build up others along the way. Make a differnce.

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    I found the topic of retribution interesting an applicable to almost any agency. How many issues go on and on for fear that speaking out will "rock the boat". Maybe its close to promotions or evaluations and we just put it off until later. We need more courage across all levels of leadership.

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      Never pass a mistake and never overlook an opportunity to praise. We have to be courageous to stand up for what's right and do the right thing. People see us either ignoring an issue or taking it on proactively. If we tolerate we condone the behaviors.

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        Sgt. Shawn Wilson

        Agreed. A mistake that is knowingly overlooked becomes the new standard and has a ripple effect on the organization. Confronting issues, I do not believe requires courage but requires tact in confronting the issue so that there is a positive outcome. As leaders, we have to be willing to confront issues as it is part of being a leader.

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    Andy Opperman

    Legacy is comprised of many important components. I have seen at least 4 police chiefs at our department and each one left a different legacy. I really liked the statement about, “its not how you start, it’s how you finish.” While I feel its important to be a solid officer and leader throughout your career most people will not remember you during your time in patrol if you are in a leadership position upon retirement. They will remember the last part of your career. So, as we grow, we must strive to continuously improve and become the image that we want our future officers to be. I like the idea of looking forward by looking back. We can have vision but as leaders we should not forgot what worked for us in the past and the history of our culture, so that we can improve upon those things we did not look so fondly upon and keep what worked. Things that work should be passed on to future leaders, we do not always need to re-invent the wheel.

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    Good leaders put others first. The analogy of tiny photographs in a mosaic to portray President Lincoln was good. That face could be any of ours, made up of all our followers, peers, and supervisors. The people we have connections with over time can create who we are as leaders. Creating relationships is big so is courage when establishing a legacy. Did we treat people right? The hard part here is not everyone is going to think that about us and that is ok. We have to show courage even when the decisions are difficult or maybe even unpopular. People will respect us for taking a stand and displaying courage for the good of all.

    We also need to mentor and teach leadership. I was never given this opportunity as an aspiring leader. Thank goodness I have a training under my belt that I can realize and try my best to pass down what I've learned to the next generation who will come after I'm gone. This could be said for many of us who are fathers and passing down various knowledge to our kids. The same holds true for a Captain or Lieutenant who passes the knowledge of leadership down to the followers.

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    Until this lesson, I always thought that a legend was someone that did great things that was a legacy. I still think that, but I think that being a legend involves more of how you went about doing something and treating others that left a long last positive impression on everyone. As a leader it is important on how you treat your team and what goals you can accomplish. Those are things that they are going to remember. They will remember some of the negative things too but the positive should outweigh the good if you really are considered a "legend" or a "legacy".

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    When I think of Legacy Leaders I think of leaders who were authentic and modelled themselves by our core values. They were the ones that genuinely cared about the people, the agency and the citizens and were able to achieve great balance for ensuring fairness to all three. One of the greatest leaders I personally knew was able to do all that and he almost always did so in a charismatic way. He presented the image that he always enjoyed where he was. When he retired people lined both sides of the street from his office to show their appreciation for his service and leadership. He left a big set of shoes to fill.

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    Sgt. Shawn Wilson

    How many people have seen retire and 1 year later no one can even remember what they did and how many people had such a vital impact on the organization that they are never forgotten. The ability to leave a legacy can happen at all levels within an organization and the legacy being built starts on day one. In my opinion leaving a legacy is not reserved for upper command but is up to the individual, when we instill leadership values and traits from day one we empower all within the organization to leave a positive legacy.

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      Brad Strouf

      Sad but true Shawn. I can certainly count many more retirees that left little to no mark on the agency than the ones that will always be remembered.

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      Matthew Menard

      I agree with you. So many times I talk with our newer staff and mention someone who previously worked for us and they have not idea who I'm talking about nor have ever heard the name before. We should all strive to leave a mark at our agency worth remembering.

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    It's funny how we start out and wanting to change the world. As we near the end of a career, all we really want to do is leave the place just a little bit better than we found it. It's amazing how humbling the world and our careers can be. This lecture was really thought provoking. I find myself thinking that I need to be very intentional about what "just a little bit better" looks like and how I can pass that on.

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      Robert Schei

      How true. As a young deputy I was always trying to push the envelope, learn more be more involved and move up the chain of command thinking that I would have the ability to make positive change or leave a more robust legacy. As I have grown in the agency and also with age I have found that everyone is leaving a legacy. Individuals who have remained deputies their entire careers and never advanced at times leave the largest impression. It is not as much about rank but more about who you are as a person that is important. The organization and the people within it don't typically remember the small achievements that seem so important at the time, they remember the character of the individual. Your humanity is vastly more important than your position in the organization.

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    Timothy Sandlin

    In this module once again we are learning to focus on developing people. Great information about the five components to leaving a legacy: significance mindset; relationships; aspirations; courage; and succession planning. I feel it is about building others and developing others to be leaders and successful. If this can occur over and over it only serves to strengthen those involved, the organization and obviously will leave a continuing legacy of leadership.

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    Robert Schei

    Do not assume anything, consistently encourage your constituents. What's the old adage? Assumptions make an ass out of you and me. How true, too many times have leaders made assumptions about employees that are false or inappropriate. This damages relationships and the culture of your workplace. Throughout my career I have heard to always challenge assumptions, communicate effectively with your constituents and avoid the rumor mill. When I hear negative or positive comments I always try to follow up with both sides to encourage honesty and personal growth and it often gives you more insight into the actual issue and understanding of the mindset of those involved.

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      Thomas Martin

      I agree with you Robert. Leaders can be quick to judge and many times we assume wrong. Avoiding gossip and encouraging others with honesty and personal growth is something we should all be doing as leaders. We cannot leave a legacy without “being the best we can be” and leaving positive impressions on those following us.

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    Nicole Oakes

    In this module we are learning about how our actions have such an influence and impact on those we work with. I believe we all strive to do the right thing but that is not the same as how others view us. I believe it is important that we show how we are capable and can handle high stress situations and that does earn a certain amount of respect but trust and ability to connect with people is even more important. These are important components to building a legacy.

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    Jacqueline Dahms

    I thought Chief Blankenship defined the 5 components of Legacy leadership well. Leaders sometimes forget that it is not about them. Significance of mindset defines that perfectly about having a serving or sacrificing mentality, putting others interests before your own agenda. Our staff do not hear often enough from us of their impact and importance. The concept of relationships in Legacy leadership is especially important. When I was promoted, it was recommended by most of my supervisors to cut ties with all my “friends” at work. Although the relationships have changed, I still maintain them with dignity and respect. I believe valuing those relationships regardless of my position has made me a better leader. I also look back at the relationships I had with past leaders that imprinted their legacy on me and how that is influenced who I am today.

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      Travis Linskens

      I appreciate your perspective. I agree with you that the goal is to be significant rather than successful. Putting our interest behind everyone else is a great way to develop a strong a lasting legacy.

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        Scott Crawford

        You are so right. If we focus our energy on making our people better, creating a winning team, we have nowhere to go but up. It will be our people create our legacy.

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    Brad Strouf

    By relying on the strong, smart people around you and learning as you are teaching, promotes self-discovery. That self-discovery makes you more aware of your strengths and weaknesses and thereby makes you a better leader. It's interesting how cyclic this process is and how it benefits the entire organization. I enjoyed this module and felt I took some lessons away from it.

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      Brad,
      I totally agree about the module, it was very informative. A leader is only as good as the people that they surround themselves with. Under respect, when Blankenship made the statement " If you have a leader that doesn't want to be liked fire them". That totally makes so much sense, if it was only that easy. These type of people are not true leaders of men/women, they are only leaders of themselves.....a very lonely place to be.

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    Leaving a legacy was the farthest thing from my mind when I began my career. But having a goal at leaving our office in a better way than it was when I began has been a goal of mine, but didn't really realize it. Staying humble is the foundation of a good leader.

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      Marshall Carmouche

      I really like you thinking about staying humble. No matter our title or rank at the end of the day we are all still people. Yes, i too wish to leave the agency better than it was before.

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      Sergeant Michael Prachel

      Indeed – the term “legacy” was foreign to me early on. As time progresses and you become more senior to young officers, there’s a feeling of maturity and a sense that you have new responsibilities. Staying humble, while using experiences to educate young officers, will help establish a legacy that can be built on as years continue.

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    Jarvis Mayfield

    Legacy to me is very important because I feel it's a way for people to judge you. Working hard to provide a positiveimage of yourself takes tons of work.

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      Ronald Smith

      Jarvis
      I hope that when I leave the judgment is over and the people I have inspired will remember the things and ways they learned, maybe not me but the legacy of doing things for the right reasons.

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    Matthew Menard

    I recently had an the opportunity to talk for awhile with someone who retired from my agency several years ago. He remarked how amazing it is that once someone leaves an agency the world doesn't stop and people carry on soon forgetting about them. I understand what he was talking about, however I feel we should all strive to leave a legacy with our agencies that carries on after we leave. We should want to "leave it better than we found it" not for personal recognition, but for betterment of the organization. This lecture did a good job of outlining how we as leaders can work towards creating that legacy.

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    Gregory Hutchins

    As with most of the instruction program, the coursework provided an alternative lens or terms for the profession, especially for aspiring leaders. Legacy leadership, the ability to make a sustainable difference, should be a goal for all that choose to lead others. Making a difference, especially in these times, requires setting the conditions through our actions, hopefully, replicated by our subordinates to be officers of character. Many of us have reflected on past leaders, sometimes with incredible respect and reverence. Other times, appreciative they are no longer part of the agency. Embracing this philosophy of developing a virtuous legacy is something all should aspire in their work. This effort more than likely would eliminate most of the systemic challenges we continually face.

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    Marshall Carmouche

    As I become entrenched in my career working on the 26th year, I would indeed like to leave a leadership legacy. I think everyone would. I never thought about a legacy until within the last year or so. A legacy should provide vision, and encouragement for those leaders who are up and coming. A legacy should be something others can mature from and build on.

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    Ronald Smith

    Legacy leadership, we have studied throughout this course the fact that every officer is a leader. There are some who do not lead people down the right path, and there are some we hate to lose because so many people were so positively affected by their presence. Since I started this career later in life and I had been part of an organization where I did everything I could do to make their part of the world better I just continued thinking like that throughout my years as a police officer. Not everyone likes the guy who tries to help whenever they can. We know from our studies people like to do things their way, to figure them out. The legacy I am trying to leave when I go is to the guy who brought as much training and awareness as possible to the people who will carry on when I am gone.

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    Sergeant Michael Prachel

    The phrase, “Leave it better than you found it,” sums up the module about Legacy Leadership. Early on in our careers, the vast majority do not think much about “legacy” – at least I did not. My biggest priority was being the best cop I could be – making arrests, being proactive, and learning as much as I could. Now that time has passed since those early years, the term legacy now hits home. I still enjoy being proactive and learning as much as I can; however, the realization that legacies are always building throughout your career is clear. Being humble, educating those around you, seeking feedback, and leading others even in difficult times will help build that foundation of your legacy.

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      Burt Hazeltine

      If every officer did their best to make their department better and had a vision past their own retirement, every officer would have a legacy. I would agree early in my career my biggest focus was not screwing up and making sure I did my job. Now I am helping plan for my division and my department to be better in the future.

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    Thomas Martin

    In components of legacy leadership part 2 Chief Blankenship discussed relationships and stated that "we should be likeable." In corrections, we tend to work with a firm attitude when dealing with troublesome inmates. The old “you can do it your way, or you can do it our way” attitude comes to mind. Sometimes this attitude carries over in how we treat our staff, and most of the time administrators are not concerned with “being likeable.” For many years I had zero cares about being liked, and focused on getting the job done backed with results. I realized my shortcomings a few years ago, and changed my attitude. I placed additional focus towards how I spoke towards my subordinates, and placed value on how they perceived me. I became more approachable, and it has paid off. Staff members seem to work harder now on their tasks, and make less errors attempting to please me. My door has always been open, but now I find people entering to visit and make recommendations to better our operation. Being likeable is starting to pay off, and I will continue to pursue it.

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      Brent Olson

      Thomas,

      Great post! I remember when I first started in law enforcement many years ago. I had several leaders who did not care, or even think about, whether or not they were liked. In fact, my first direct supervisor exemplified so many of the negative characteristics of leaders we have learned about in many courses throughout this program so far. He was universally not liked to the point that the officers on our shift would avoid any interaction with him that was not necessary. We worked the night shift, and officers would stay out of the office and out on the road just to not be around him.

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    Travis Linskens

    This module provides a powerful message. Your legacy should be one of the most important things to remember and enhance throughout your career. I believe it is also essential as a leader to welcome criticism and feedback. It enables us to develop our skills and improve our leadership ability and encourages people to be comfortable identifying problems and help develop solutions.

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    Paul Brignac III

    I believe your legacy is determined by what you put your effort in. I've heard that you know the tree by the fruit it bears. I believe this is true, and that what you choose to focus on will manifest in the results of your efforts.

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      Sgt. Samantha Koscher

      Good point. If we put time and energy into developing the people around us, that is setting them up for success.

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      Steve Mahoney

      I agree. Leaving a good legacy is almost like raising kids. As a parent you want to do everything you can to make sure your children have a better life and more successful than you. I believe this should be the same as a leader. we should develop our subordinates to be better than us and not be afraid when that happens

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    Eric Sathers

    My greatest takeaway from this module is that leaving a legacy is more about the process of building a legacy than what is left behind in the end. By having a legacy mindset throughout our career we can strive for excellence and significance every day. We should do our best to create harmony through relationship building, aspiring to others, and demonstrating courage. If we do all of this well, the legacy we leave behind will be solid.

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    Sgt. Samantha Koscher

    Prior to reviewing this module, I hadn't given much of thought to what legacy I am building. In reviewing the materials, I learned the importance of building a legacy with the people around you and pursuing excellence everyday. I liked the reference to the photo mosaic. The legacy you leave behind is about the people who have influenced you and those you have influenced.

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      Kaiana Knight

      I agree Samantha. I really didn't give it much thought either until after I reviewed this lesson. I think that if you influence enough of people with positivity, motivation, courage, and trust you will leave behind a good legacy.

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    Steve Mahoney

    When I think of all the leaders/supervisors that I have had over my career and what they thought about what leaving a legacy was I notice (2) very distinct things. The supervisors at the time seemed to be into self promoting. They were constantly saying what they did for you and the organization. They had this feeling of arrogance and entitlements that they did something great for the pd and probably believe that they would be remembered for that. The leaders didn't do the self promotion. They worked hard and did everything they could to help the people they lead to be better. When they retired they didn't want to be remembered and recognized for what they did. They were happy for the offices they helped mold. These people are the ones that I remember and truly have a legacy

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      Buck Wilkins

      I have had supervisors like that and they are only looking out for them self. instead of teaching others the correct way to lead.

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    Scott Crawford

    I feel like every great leader is concerned about their legacy, the difference to me is those who quietly continue to forge on, vs those who tell everyone what their legacy will be. Great legacies can never happen without a great team around you. We must instill greatness in our people if we want to leave a lasting legacy.

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    Buck Wilkins

    What I took from this lecture is that Good leaders must have good communication with those under their direction. Also leaders need feedback to ensure that the agency's mission, values and goals are being met. A good leader must be able to accept negative feedback and solutions to remedy any conflict or problems.

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      Acceptance of feedback is critical I agree. The challenge is that we need to make sure people understand that constructive criticism and feedback is welcomed, but simply challenging change or being critical of things simply to be critical of them is counter productive. We have people in our agency that provide great feedback, and others that simply want to argue.

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        Derek Champagne

        There are just some people at my Agency that will argue with you just to argue. They feel that they were passed over for a promotion and therefore they have a negative attitude about everything and also they are the same ones who can not take the constructive criticism.

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    I like the principal of leaving a legacy and combining it with the essay assignment regarding the fear of retribution. If we want to succeed, we must as individuals and an organization be willing to accept feedback and create an environment where there is no fear of retaliation for providing it. And as Anderson (2017) said, “Once we assume that we make a difference in the organization no matter where we are, we will realize that leaving a legacy is just not solely the responsibility of the top leader, its for all of us”. Creating an atmosphere of accepting feedback without fear of retaliation is step one to making people realize they make a difference in the organization.

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      Kevin Balser

      I meet with my staff every other month to discuss any type of grievances the team members may have which could affect job performance. Early on when this was initiated there was not much conversation because they were discouraged by speaking up. This was due to old management not allowing them to have significance. But as the frequency of the meetings occurred the staff understood that I was listening and acting on some of the problems for their betterment. This was certainly encouraging and motivated the immediate staff to communicate with me further about problems. They knew moving forward that there would be no retribution for bringing forth their ideas.

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      I agree, so many individuals are afraid to make suggestions or give feed back; because of the fear of retaliation or being ridiculed. We as leaders have to create a hostile free atmosphere. Sometimes great ideas are never spoken are brought forward; because of the uncomfortable environment.

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    Brent Olson

    I think the current beliefs, thoughts, and attitudes towards law enforcement, by a segment of the public, will make it harder to be a legacy leader. This is a tough time to be a leader in general, as the expectations on me by the public and officers have increased. My subordinates look to me to stay energized and motivated, while putting what is "happening out there" into perspective for them. While harder, it can also be viewed as an opportunity to have an even greater impact. I think the single hardest thing of being a legacy leader is always putting others first. This is something I work on every day, by making the conscious effort to ask myself if I am putting my own interests first in a given situation. I think that in theory, everyone believes they are doing this. However, I think many would find this is hard to do 100 percent of the time. My success comes from the success of those I supervise and I have seen this firsthand to be true. If I provide those I supervise the opportunity and expectation to exemplify excellence, my successes are derived from there.

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      Kenneth Davis

      Brent- I cannot disagree with your assertion. I am of the opinion that folks that do respond in these instances will have to exhibit a great deal of moral courage. At some point we realize that we do this job for several reasons. Of course, one of the most important is to make a difference. It seems when we are less tenured officers, early in our career, we tend to make a difference with folks on the street. As we move forward in our careers, it seems evident as though that transition moves towards making a difference in the agency...and then the spill-over benefits the street. Jus some thoughts.

      Best and stay safe-

      Ken

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      Chris Crawford

      Very eloquently put. And I definitely agree that today it does appear to be harder to do especially toward the younger officers.

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    Robert Vinson

    I appreciated the proactive approach to succession planning presented in the module. I think it's easy to just consider promotions as the openings become available, instead of putting thought into planning an appropriate succession.

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    Derek Champagne

    I think that building a legacy is crucial in building strong leaders within the Agency. I have a former supervisor that I joke with quite often about how he is my Bill Parcells of the “Coaching tree”. If you take a look at all of the great coaches in football, members from their original staff have all move on and most are just as successful. I want to ensure that I offer the same guidance, directions, opportunity, and leadership that I was given in my journey so that when I move on from my position, my legacy is positive and those who I’ve led continue to excel.

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      Jay Callaghan

      Derek, you are fortunate to have your own "BP" to grow from. Great analogy!

      Jay Callaghan
      Session #013

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    Jay Callaghan

    I have worked with some really amazing cops; who were very component in their jobs and as leaders. They knew what to do and when to do it. However, many struggled with relationships internally. Some allowed only a select few in their inner circle, some thought it was a right of passage that they weren't liked. The idea of being "hated" motivated them. The idea of forming relationships was taboo to them because in their mind, it made them vulnerable; putting up a wall; empowered them to act in an atmosphere of secrecy and intrigue, which they enjoyed.

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    Kenneth Davis

    A theme that reverberates in this module is that of leaving a department in better shape than how it was found. This resonates on a professional and personal plane. Many officers, in the past, have not understood that leadership belongs to everyone, not just those in lofty positions within the agency. Each and every officer has the ability...and the rersponsibility...to practice accountability and leadership at every level within the department. Even without formal leadership training, leaders can mentor and coach their peers to take on responsible roles within the agency and to further coach and mentor less tenured employees. It is pure culture building.

    In the past, these tasks have been left to identified/appointed agency leaders. In the current environment, it will be paramount for everyone to step up to the plate. Everyone within the agency should shoulder some ownership and seek to improve the culture by contributing to the agency's betterment. Such can be accomplished through formal or informal means utilizing in-house training, field training opportunities or simple improvement committee assignments. As police reform begins to progress, these roles will have to be addressed if agencies want credible, positive change.

    Ken Davis

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      Ronald Springer

      Ken,
      I agree with your assessment that everyone should be a leader and take on that responsibility. Building a culture that promotes that ideal is important and hopefully will be part of all our legacies we leave with our agencies. I’m not sure that committees are necessary for fulfilling this task. I think it works best through grass-roots campaigns of promoting it within by recognizing it and celebrating it. When it is celebrated and recognized then it will be imitated and spread through the agency and the culture will develop and follow the demand.

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    Ronald Springer

    Legacy Leadership is something I was taught in the beginning of my career when I first became a Field Training Officer. The instructor for that class started it by telling us we are all leaders and we will be measured by the legacy we leave behind. He then explained that from the moment we start to train our first recruit until well past the end of our career we will have left a legacy in the agency. For every person we teach and train to be professional law enforcement officers we directly effect them. Then in turn when they become FTOs and teach the next generation the skills and lessons we taught will be passed on and remain long after we are gone. “So youz guyz do good and do it right!” Lieutenant Rocco Dominic Jr. His is a legacy that remains even after he retired and subsequently passed on. His lesson is reflected in this module and how people will remember our actions long after we are gone.

    Blankenship, G. (2017). Legacy leadership. Module 2, Weeks 5 & 6. National Command and Staff College.

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    Kaiana Knight

    I think that leaving a legacy is beneficial when you leave a positive one. Some people leave a bad legacy. I think a good leader will leave a good legacy without even setting out to do it. A legacy represents your body of work during each stage of your career as you establish the foundational building blocks. The lesson stated that legacy thinking locates you in the history of your agency. I always aim to be recognized for the future of my agency. I think every good leader should leave a legacy!

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    Burt Hazeltine

    We need to promote leaders that are legacy-minded. Leaders that care more for the future of the department than they do themselves and their own personal control. We need leaders that have a vision of the future of the department for well past when they retire. I find that many senior officers and leaders get the attitude of I won't be here so it does not matter. These are actually the things that matter the most. I have a supervisor that will probably be retiring in about a year. He has been making plans for our division that will not be completed for at least five years. He has the best future of our division in mind.

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      Darryl Richardson

      Burt, I completely agree with you. Those types of leaders not only want to leave a legacy behind but they also want to build one in order to teach younger officers what they need to do and how to do it.

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    Chris Crawford

    This was a thought provoking module for me. It was interesting to me to consider what kind of legacy would I leave being my motivation to provide honest professional police work. I suppose a humble sense of pride in what you would be remembered by and the commitment to the department and community before self would be a noble achievement.

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    Kevin Balser

    Legacy leaders have to work very hard to empower and encourage leadership to grow along with them. We have to remember that it is not how we start but it is how we finish our careers to encourage significant leaders. These leaders have to be willing to inspire open and very candid conversations. By doing this as leaders, we will have success while making other team members feeling like they have significance, just as Chief Blankenship discussed in his presentation. Striving to build success in my career comes with great value and is rewarding, but adding this value will contribute to the other team members' significance. Successful leaders accomplish this by encouraging not discouraging open feedback from their subordinates.

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      Andrew Peyton

      Kevin,

      Looking back I have certainly recognized that some of my great leaders were always open to feedback. They listened to what you had to say and truly acted on the feedback you provided them. For me, this has had a significant impact on my leadership style and approach. For me, this feedback also holds true to the saying "The day you stop learning is the day you need to retire." we can always learn from someone, no matter their position, rank, or experience.

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    Darryl Richardson

    This legacy leadership module made me start to think of some of my past leaders and what legacy will I be leaving. Even though I have a long time to go before I can retire, I want to know that I am leaving a good legacy. Now I know the components to leaving a legacy as a good leader.

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      Great aspect to this topic! We should all consider what we leave behind. Sadly, many think about the policy named after them, or the person they most frequently annoyed. That is not the kind of legacy we should leave!! I hope you continue to seek and understand how you will leave a positive legacy for your agency!

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      Jeff Byrne

      We've been having a lot of legacy conversations around our agency and reflecting back on folks who have retired as well. Very timely lecture for me as some of the folks I started with are beginning to think about retirement.

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    Andrew Peyton

    Legacy leaders look towards the future. They work with those around them to ensure they will be prepared to lead the organization into the future. Being a legacy leader doesn't just mean everyone knows your name and talks about you long after you are gone from the agency. A legacy leader has made a significant impact on someone's future. Someone will one day say "This is something I was taught by him that has helped me be the officer I am today." This is something I strive for everyday.

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    Great module on legacy leadership; I think it would be a good course that should be taught in a basic academy or in-service. Having high moral standards and strong beliefs are great qualities to possess. Possessing these qualities and staying true to your own values; regardless of the situation is very important. Beliefs, morals, and values speak volumes in reference to an individual's character. Your efforts, dedication, and loyalty will impact your future and your legacy.

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      David Mascaro

      I agree that this module should be taught to everyone, including those officers in the beginning stages of their careers.

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      Jose Alvarenga

      I think learning about legacy leadership can also have a positive effect on new upcoming Millennials. They would be able to see how they can be part of something important for Their organization's future. Good idea.

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      Zach Roberts

      Kevin,

      I would absolutely agree. This module would be great to be taught in a basic academy or even an biennial in-service. I think this would be great for new deputies to see as well as current leaders of the department a standard to live up to so that new deputies are provided a leadership standard to work up to. I like how you mention how one's efforts, dedication and loyalty impacts their future and legacy.

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    David Mascaro

    The fear of retribution in any agency for giving feedback is telling on several different fronts. I would like to start with the fear being on an individual level and as was discussed in previous learning modules, we would have to establish if the fear was perceived, felt or real. This would indicate if you were dealing with an individual who lacked courage to do what was right or an environment where the leadership has developed the culture to believe this is not welcome. The latter example would actually develop the first, an individual who fears giving feedback and the cycle would continue and stagnate the agency. To move forward, an atmosphere or culture needs to be developed that promotes feedback or your agency will not advance to meet the needs of the future.

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    Jose Alvarenga

    Legacy leadership is certainly not something new deputies have in mind when they first begin working for the agency. However, this topic should be part of the learning curriculum in an agency for new deputies. Additionally, as new millennials are added to the rank, they will be included in something important for their agency's future. This will probably also help with retention as more experienced deputies feel and want to leave their mark o the agency as they continue their carrier.

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    I really enjoyed this session and instructor. I wish we had a leader that held weekly leadership meetings!! It is an under valued tactic in developing a great workplace!

    This lesson was an important reminder to not assume that my employees know their value. People, generally, love to be encouraged and hear the value of their opinions and insight. It is crucial for leaders to continually recognize the efforts of co-workers.

    My favorite comment was if a leader doesn’t want to be liked, they should be fired!! Too often I see leaders in their position, relishing in their power, and completely forgetting humanity and the power of relationships! Enjoy leading, or get out!!

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    Jeff Byrne

    I really enjoyed this lecture. Legacy leadership should be introduced in our academy's and field training programs. When thinking about succession planning, legacy thinking forces us to think about the present, but in a larger context, as stated in this lecture. Thinking about the new officers coming on who will succeed us in the agency and getting them in the mindset of legacy thinking is a missed opportunity if we aren't doing that.

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      Donald Vigil

      I couldn't agree with you more Jeff. I didn't learn about the importance of legacy until about 15 years into my career. It just wasn't something that my previous command staff talked about. However, it is of great importance to my current command staff. When they introduced this it really made me stop and reflect and gave cause to a course correction.

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    Zach Roberts

    Legacy leadership is definitely something I as a new officer had no idea about or even concerned myself with. I was very fortunate to be able to work under some great leaders who taught me about legacy leadership and the importance behind it. These leaders would come to work everyday with the purpose of leaving a legacy with everything they did and every decision they made. We have been truly invested in leading by example so that incoming deputies see what good leadership is and they can work to reach that level. This has proven to improve employee retention as deputies are given something to work towards. I have heard many new deputies say I want so and so's spot are want to be like and do what he or she is doing.

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    Donald Vigil

    The legacy leadership concept of "It's not how you start but how you finish", really struck a cord with me. This is a positive mindset that reminds me that it's really never to late and that there is always hope when you put forth your best effort.

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      Jared Paul

      I liked this concept as well. This kind of mindset can have good benefits for you and the others around you. It can set a great example and encourage others to have that positive outlook.

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      Andrew Ashton

      I agree as like any great plan, once it is in play, that is usually when it goes to shit. You must be versatile and continue on with a positive mindset. If we sit back defeated then we are defeated. With the right mindset we can turn any situation around.

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    Jared Paul

    I thought this module had a lot of great info! The component I enjoyed the most was courage. It is common to hear that to be in law enforcement you need to be courageous. This is especially true in leadership, and I don't just mean the physical courage. I think it is just as important to have the internal courage to lead within the law enforcement field, especially in todays environment. It takes courage and humility to face adversity, and I feel that as a first line supervisor we often face adversity.

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    Andrew Ashton

    For me it is apparent that throughout most of these modules the common theme is more relationship based. Without fostering relationships with our people the lines of communication aren't as effective as they can be. I too believe that legacy is very important not only as an example for those you supervise but more so for our families and children.

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    Glenn Hartenstein

    Legacy leadership is defined as the impact and influence you have on others over your tenure as a leader. I've seen few leaders who are considered legacy leaders throughout my 22 yr career, but the few I've worked with definitely had an impact on me. I had a Captain in my department that I considered a legacy leader that guided me to become the leader that I am today. He had all the values mentioned in this module that define a legacy leader. He was someone who always strived to be the best and served as a role model for others. Even though he has since retired from this department, he left a lasting impression on me.