Command and Staff Program

ACE Track

Leadership in Practice: Effective Leadership

Replies
199
Voices
101
Dr. Mitch Javidi
Instructions:  
  1. Post a new discussion related to the topics covered in this module.  Your post needs to provide specific lessons learned with examples from this module helping you enhance your leadership capacity at work.
  2. After posting your discussion, review posts provided by other students in the class and reply to at least one of them. 
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    Monte Potier

    After viewing the lecture I believe the most important trait of a successful police leader is the trait of "Competence". To be truly "Competent" you must have the knowledge on how to do your job. Many leaders posses some of other traits, however leaders lead from the front, which means you must be knowledgeable of your job to do so.

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      Brian Johnson

      Monte, I generally agree with you but I would offer that effective leaders can be "generalists" in many areas withing law enforcement and still be competent leaders. Effective leaders are self-aware of their weaknesses, so they surrounding themselves with other team members that are strong in their area of weakness to compliment and support the team. As Sam Walton simply stated, "None of us, is smarter than all of us."

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        Sergeant Chad Blanchette

        I would have to agree with Brian on this one. In Rudy's speech, he spoke of identifying your weaknesses and then if you are not able to fulfill those weaknesses, hire someone who exceeds in those areas.

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      Joey Prevost

      I would differ slightly Sir, and say that Credibility would be more important. If a leader has credibility, they will be trustworthy enough they will know where they are lacking. If it is in Competence, they will gain the skills necessary to model competence in the new area.

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        Lt. Mark Lyons

        I agree that credibility is one of the most important traits for a leader to possess. I believe that having a combination of credibility and influence are crucial elements to being an effective leader.

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      Dan Wolff

      Monte Potier,
      I believe what you are saying is important but not the most important. I have worked with individuals that lead me in an organization that were not the most competent but the battles they won to get where they were was not based on their knowledge of the job. They had the highest credibility in the organization and knew how to empower those that knew more than him and create a team to be successful. He used humility but at the same time didn’t pretend to be something he was not. He was constantly learning to become more competent but I think he utilized the other traits to increase his weaknesses which he put out there for everyone and asked to help him be stronger.

      Dan

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      Ryan Manguson

      I would have to agree with Brian and Chad as well. Although competence is very important, we as life long learners are continually increasing in competence and need to rely on the knowledge of those around us as well. I agree Sam Walton said it well, "No one of us is smarter than all of us".

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      Major Willie Stewart

      Monte,
      I agree with you that competence is a very important trait in police leaders. Being knowledgeable and efficient on the job helps to be more effective leaders and mentors. We have to remember that many of our followers depend on that front end leadership.

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    Kyle Turner

    In listening to the interview with Jack Welch, former CEO of GE, something stood out that I have never heard before. His 3rd piece of advice that he gives to people newly in the workforce is to be privately ambitious. He explains that it is ok to be ambitious and he encourages it, but don't be obvious about it. I think this makes a lot of sense for new employees and would assist in anyone's transition into the organization, help them establish relationships with others, and build trust. If people are obviously ambitious, these things are much harder to do.

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      Frank Acuna

      Kyle,

      I like Jack Welch's advice as well, if you walk around with ambition on your face, some will see that as cocky in our profession. Drive and determination can be modest and you can still be effective without putting others off by your enthusiasm. Funny to say out loud, because enthusiasm is good but our competitive nature calls for humility so that we can all function together as a team.

      Frank

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      Chris Corbin

      Great point Kyle. There is definitely a time and place to show your ambitions, and one must be careful to be cognizant of that to avoid the potential negative impacts that could arise of appearing over-ambitious. These could include creating an impression that an individual is only out for themselves, which in turn can lead to distrust and disconnection amongst their team.

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      I really like the point that you made about being "privately ambitious". When I think of ambitious I think of people being excited and quickly accomplishing tasks or taking on challenges that are may be difficult and time consuming. That seems as though it would be difficult to hide or keep private, but now that I think about it, I know several people that accomplish things without making it known. They accomplish things that others wouldn't necessarily take on and don't look for any credit from doing it.

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    Frank Acuna

    There were many leadership perspectives shared in this lesson which were effective for those who used them. To be an effective police leader, you must demonstrate caring, competence, credibility, communication, courage, and collaboration. To truly care for your staff means you help them develop themselves, rather than use them to meet your goals. You must be competent and learn how to be a good leader in your position. You must gain credibility and earn trust by demonstrating truthfulness and accountability. Communication is key and can often stifle relationships and growth. You must actively work to improve your communication skills with your staff, boss and the public. Leaders must be courageous, stand up for their values and challenge mediocrity. They must learn to collaborate well, work well with others and network to get tasks accomplished.

    Frank

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      Nancy Franklin

      Frank, I agree that communication - if done improperly - can stifle relationships. It is important to constantly work on your communication style and the ability to adapt it to your intended audience. Collaboration is also key to ensuring leadership effectiveness. We can't do this job on our own - it takes a confident and inspired team to achieve the end result.

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      Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

      Frank, I agree that communication is our key skill. If a leader has the other traits but can not effectively communicate, he will be looked upon as a weak leader.

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    Brian Johnson

    The common theme through out this module was honesty, integrity, and team. Each speaker was grounded in purpose, mission, and strong moral beliefs. Credible leadership starts with your character as a leader. If you don't have true character, you will not care about people (self-interest), lack competence ( cheat to get ahead), lack credibility (no moral compass), bad communicator (lack listening skills), lack courage (can't make tough decision), and collaboration (takes credit for success). I have said this in prior posts, our honesty and integrity is a perishable skill, you must instill the mission, vision, and core values as law enforcement professional on a daily basis. The culture you allow is the culture you create within your organization. We must all be credible leaders.

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    Joey Prevost

    It it amazing that all these great leaders represented such a broad spectrum, yet they all had the same traits in common. I think a positive attitude is a fantastic place to start. The six traits will follow suit if we start with the right attitude.

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      Jason Porter

      Agreed. If you go in to something with a defeated attitude, then you will have a much harder time convincing your team or staff to get on board to accomplish the task.

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      Jarod Primicerio

      The right attitude is so necessary. Nothing else will sit well with others, including yourself if it is off. All the training won't help if the focus isn't on oneself first.

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      Lance Leblanc

      I agree Joey, a positive attitude is an excellent place to start. If negativity spreads throughout the troops and it may cause poor performance and a lack of motivation. The right attitude sets the tone for any job.

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      Brian Lewis

      Agree 100%. As a leader with a poor attitude, you set the tone for the rest of your division. I have witnessed leaders with bad attitudes suck the wind out of people's sails. Motivation, ingenuity, and proactivity come to a screeching halt.

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    Jason Porter

    The six traits for an effective leader are common in all the modules that have been presented. These traits are the same ones that we should live our personal lives by as well. Being caring and competent in what we teach our children. Communication with our spouse, having courage to institute change in our day to day lives to better our ways. Being a great and effective leader is being a great and effective person.

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      You make a good point Jason and I believe some people focus so hard on being a leader at work they forget to employ those characteristics in everyday life. I am a firm believer in family first and preach it to the guys, but I also know I need to practice what a preach.

      Again, well put!

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    Dan Wolff

    To be an effective leader this module pointed out 6 traits: Caring, competence, credibility, communication, courage, and collaboration. As we learned in previous modules credibility is the foundation of any leader. However, when combined with the other five traits will help you attain to be an effective leader. As with the nine individuals portrayed had each of these traits to be successful leaders in their area. As Ronald Reagan stated, “let people do what they do best” , think sums it up very well.

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    Chris Corbin

    With Jack Welch's passing this last weekend, there has been much discussion and commentary this week about his leadership and legacy. While no one seems to be rewriting history, I have heard numerous opinions that while his leadership style was indeed great for its time, it would not fit or work as well in today's world because it focused more on operations and less on people. Some have asserted that Mr. Welch did not effectively demonstrate the 'caring' trait, and that in today's world, this would have limited his ability to achieve his prior levels of success. It just goes to show that we must remain self-aware, commit to continuous learning, and never forget that if we don't change with time, we will most likely be left behind.

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      Drauzin Kinler

      Chris, I believe that with each generation that comes along, we will have to tweak our leadership skills to fit their style. I previously mentioned in a post that my definition of a leader has changed from now going through this training, and when I became a police officer 31 years ago. My opinion of some of the leaders I worked with was very high until the training showed me that they were not good leaders at all. I do not blame them for the way they supervised. I blame the people that were in charge of not providing them the training or knowledge of how to be a great leader.

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    Jarod Primicerio

    This module highlighted some of the most influential leaders in recent times. I love the leadership style of President Reagan and his belief to allow the people put into their respective positions to do their best. His hands-off approach empowered people to give it their all, and lessoned the need to be a micro-manager. Using the six traits of a successful police leader and recognizing what area(s) need improvement, is crucial. I consistently strive for them all but consistently focus on effective communication, which includes active listening.

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      clouatre_kj@jpso.com

      I agree! I really enjoyed the speeches that were presented in this module. President Reagan's style is one that I emulate.

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    Mike Brown

    After viewing the lecture I believe the most important traits of a successful police leader are a mixture of several which include caring,communication and courage.To truly care for your employees means you help and allow them develop the skills needed, and according to Reagan point them in the right direction them do what they do.

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      Monte Potier

      I agree on your comment. I believe that your employees want to know that you care for them and if they do they will try harder to make you "shine".

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    Drauzin Kinler

    In viewing this module, the instructor covered the style of some great effective leaders. Although all these leaders were different in many ways, they were all able to lead because they possessed the traits of caring, competence, credibility, communication, courage, and collaboration effectively. To look at the accomplishments these leaders achieved is astounding. I could only wish to become a leader to the same caliber as those mentioned in the lecture.

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    Nancy Franklin

    This lecture provided a good overview of the styles and philosophies of some great leaders. All displayed some level of the six traits discussed in this module: caring, competence, credibility, communication and courage. It is important that people know and FEEL that a leader genuinely cares about them and believes in them. Having the ability to establish and maintain a professional and caring relationship with constituents is critical to a leader having followers. Leaders don't have to know how to do everything, but do require a solid foundational knowledge of the organization and know who and how to plug in vital resources where they themselves lack knowledge and skills. This demonstrates competence and the humility to recognize that you don't always have all of the answers - but know where to find them. Credibility and communication are key to effective leadership - without them leaders will not be able to develop relationships.

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      Amanda Pertuis

      Very well said Nancy. I agree, credibility and communication are needed to build effective relationships.

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    Lance Leblanc

    I enjoyed this video lecture compared to most. I especially liked Vince Lombardi's motivational speech. The lecture identified six traits of a successful police leader. I would differently agree, good/great leaders should possess all six traits.

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      Judith Estorge

      I found Lombardi and Norman's video to be the best. To hear the enthusiasm and motivation in both was inspiring.

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    Chasity Arwood

    All great leaders should possess the six traits discussed in the lecture. I believe that credibility and communication are the two most important traits for an effective leader.

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      chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

      I agree with you as well that all six traits are needed to effective be a successful police leader, because all six of the traits go hand and hand with one another. In order to maintain and successfully have the next trait, you have to start with the first trait.

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    Judith Estorge

    This was an excellent module of learning. I always enjoy watching well respected leaders speak and provide their wisdom. I also liked the 6 traits covered in this lecture. The trait I focus on is credibility which is a work in progress. Becoming an effective leader will be achievable if I achieve all 6 leadership traits.

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      David Cupit

      I agree with you Judith, to achieve the goal of becoming a great leader one must possess all 6 traits discussed in the lecture.

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    David Cupit

    This was a good module and informative. Watching respected leaders speak and learning about their characteristics and leadership style was educational. Learning about the 6 traits of a successful police leader was good.

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    Brian Lewis

    I really enjoyed this module and hearing the words from past leaders like Patton and Lombardi. Their messages ring true today. But one that I will pass on to my subordinates is 3 pieces of great advice from Jack Welch: over deliver, have a positive attitude, and don't be so ambitious to the point it's a neon sing on your forehead.

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      Laurie Mecum

      Brian, I enjoyed this module as well. It was really great hearing all the messages from some great leaders. Some I would not have really never thought of, but they were great examples.

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      Clint Patterson

      Brian, the subcategory with Lombardi, was inspiring. It brought me back to my football years and the great motivating pregame speeches giving to our team. The phrase “do you want to be remembered as a winner,” resonated with leaving a legacy behind.

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      Donnie

      I have often relied on using successful people as motivators to get something accomplished. When subordinates see successful people that they already know and have heard of they tend to try to relate to them using their success to motivate them. You just have to be careful to ensure the goals that are set aren’t too big to accomplish.

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        dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

        I agree with you, Donnie. I try to model my leadership style after successful leaders from whom I've worked. And I think you're correct, we do have to ensure that the goals aren't too big to accomplish.

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      Samantha Reps

      I also agree with this module was good. Hearing about all past credible leaders and their messages was great. I also thought the advice from Jack Welch is something to take to heart.

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    Laurie Mecum

    This module had a lot of valuable information. I think the overall takeaway and what we keep hearing is leaders need to be credible. People want leaders that are going to listen to them, let them share their ideas and give input. They want communication and collaboration as well. These are all traits of good leaders.

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      David Ehrmann

      Absolutely. Also, people want leaders who care about them. They want a leader who will put them in the best position to succeed. They want a leader who puts their self-interest to the side while focusing on what is better for their people.

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      Christian Johnson

      I agree, Laurie.

      I believe it all comes down to credibility. Without it, everything else is immaterial.

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    Clint Patterson

    I enjoyed the subtopic about Sam Walton. Sam started his life with great vision and goal setting by being the youngest Eagle Scout. He then went on to be the most dominant retailer in the world. But what I enjoyed most about Sam’s story was his leadership qualities that made him so unique. He genuinely cared about everyone he came in contact and talked to them all the same way. He never had an ego issue and had respect for others. Sam stated, “no one of us is smarter than all of us.” I think we, as leaders, need to strive to be like this, use our servant leadership skills and inspire others to gravitate to us naturally.

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      Roanne Sampson

      Clint, Sam Walton's style of leadership allowed him to accomplish so much. Leaders must have a vision and not display egos.

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      Royce Starring

      I agree. Having worked for one of Sam's Walton retail store I experienced his leadership first hand. He was big on customer satisfaction and employee morale.

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    David Ehrmann

    I enjoyed learning about the 9 leaders and their leadership traits discussed in this module. The most common theme each leader had always dealt with people. Either motiving them, showing them the leader cared, empowering them, or rewarding them, the message each leader had was clear. Care about your people, be a credible leader, and you and your people will succeed.

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      ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

      Excellent point. The common thread is people and they can accomplish great things when they feel like they matter.

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    Roanne Sampson

    There were excellent examples of phenomenal credible leaders in this module. They all have accomplished so much in their life time. Oprah Winfrey pointed out that leaders need to dream, build their resume about their purpose, and push themselves. Colin Powell also discussed the organization having purpose as well as the leader. Rudy Giuliani wanting leaders to know their weaknesses. Leaders must have strong beliefs and a plan. They must display integrity, loyalty and high values. Credible leaders in law enforcement must care, be competent, be credible, use effective communication, have courage and be collaborative. This is very powerful.

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    Christian Johnson

    I really enjoyed the stories showcasing the different leaders throughout the module.

    I am also taking away a lot from the 6 Traits of a Successful Police Leader: Caring, Competence, Credibility, Communication, Courage and Collaboration.

    Each trait leads to the ability to have the next, yet they are thoroughly intertwined as well.

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    Amanda Pertuis

    The Effective Leaders discussed in this Module were inspirational and informative. I also got a lot out of the 6 Traits of a Successful Police Leader.

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      Rocco Dominic, III

      I also took a lot away from this module. I like Jack Welches theory; Give people self confidence is most important. It will cause them to act. By giving them confidence will also lead to inspiration.

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    Rocco Dominic, III

    This module showed how the 6 traits of leadership are vital to being and effective leader. Each of the leaders presented in this module practiced the traits of leadership.

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    McKinney

    Effective leaders can reach across boundaries if they are self-aware. There was a significant amount of information provided within this lesson that can assist in developing ourselves more for the members that we serve. I genuinely believe that if you are or willing to employ the 6 Traits of a Successful Leader, then we'll be more accomplished in building meaningful relationships with others.

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      Lance Landry

      McKinney, I believe the building blocks of the 6 Traits of a Successful Police leader are key. I say building blocks because it all begins with caring. The rest build off of it.

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    Donnie

    There seemed to be a common attribute to the success of these celebrities and that was team work. They appeared to rely on other individual’s ability to contribute to the team vision for success. While I understand that each person in the lecture is an individual, they had to rely on other people’s decision making which contributed to their overall success. I’ve always been a believer in promoting the team vs any individual. I believe that rewarding individuals prompts others to contribute to the team success.

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      Burke

      Teamwork truly makes the dream work. I concur in your assessment on the group effort that made these people leaders.

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        michael-beck@lpso.net

        There used to be a sergeant who worked with me, whose continuous mantra was "Teamwork makes the dream work." Some thought it was hokey but eventually it caught on and people began to work more closely with one another, spouting it all of the time. It goes to show that if people hear it more multiple times, it becomes ingrained in who they are.

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      Adam Gonzalez

      Awesome observation! Teamwork! Had you not pointed this out, I may have been inclined to glaze over it. Each success story did share how nothing was accomplished alone and independent. Some were more forthcoming than others in this, but together each did share how not one of them was an island unto themselves. If we are to seek out what we each dream to achieve, we to will require that others share in our dream, in our vision. We each will need the help and dedication of others. Thank you again for your insight!

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      Brad Strouf

      Yes, I agree as well. Where I saw significant differences in the leadership qualities of some of the examples used, I also saw that teamwork and the reliance of others is critical to be an effective leader. This theme seems to resonate throughout the modules.

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    Lance Landry

    I really enjoyed hearing the stories of each of the different leaders in this module. They each possessed different characters that lead them to being successful leaders. Patton and Reagan thrived with delegating responsibility, and Welch directed by intellect not authority. Walton was committed to his belief, and Lombardi led with instilling confidence through hard work and perseverance. Powell displayed humility and Giulianni stuck with his beliefs. Each of these great leader’s traits can be emulated.

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      jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

      I too enjoyed hearing each leaders story. Especially the stories of Patton and Powell. I have always regarded the two leaders as being great and the stories are almost something of legend. I found that each leaders story was summarized by the six traits and each of them applied these traits in their leadership success.

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    Burke

    I enjoyed the this module and the different leaders used. The courage and credibility that was displayed in each is inspiring and good tool to remind us of what we should be doing everyday.

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      Lieutenant John Champagne

      I also enjoyed the stories of the different leaders and learning their stories. The thing they all had in common is the courage to step out of their comfort zone and lead.

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        Henry Dominguez

        I agree John and also noticed that each one possessed a true genuine passion in what they were doing. I believe in having these qualities is what made them stand out be great. They truly cared about what they were doing.

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    Royce Starring

    I thought this lesson very interesting. The six trait are stepping stone that lead to a successful police leader. Each one build off of each other.

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    jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

    I enjoyed this module of instruction and really enjoyed the stories of leadership by each of the great leaders. Each leader had the ability to inspire and motivate people to be the best they could be. I'm going to research any books written by General Powell and President Reagan. I'm sure I can learn something from each of them about leadership. The six traits of a successful leader is something I will strive to follow in my future leadership.

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      I agree that I would like to read more about each of the leaders presented in this module. Often we are familiar with the names and the cliff notes versions of what they are famous far, but I love finding out more of the details, the struggles, and the triumphs that truly make the person human and even more inspirational.

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      cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

      I think I will do the same. Colin Powell and Ronald Reagan are two of my favorite leaders. I also feel I can learn a lot from them and use it to become a better leader.

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      McKinney

      There were some exciting stories in this module. You mentioned more research into Colin Powell and President Regan, may I suggest Colin Powell’s book “It worked for me” ISBN 978-0-06-213512-4. I was gifted with this particular book, and it is an excellent read with a wealth of knowledge.

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    Lieutenant John Champagne

    I enjoyed the advice from Welch, over-deliver, walk around with a positive attitude, and do not be overly ambitious. Over time it is easy to lose focus on what we should be doing as a leader. Sometimes we have to refocus on the simple things. This is something I will try to do consistently.

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      Major Stacy Fortenberry

      The positive attitude portion strikes a bell with me. In my mid career I fell into a slump and my attitude was not pleasant. This caused conflict at work and at home. After lots of heartaches I finally realized that I was the problem not others and changed my attitude. Now this is one of areas I attempt to help others with. Having a bad attitude can be a career killer.

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      cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

      I liked this too. Having a positive attitude makes things easier. Focusing on the small simple things gets the job done consistently.

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    The diversity of the group of leaders selected does a great job in showing the universal characteristics of leadership. While the circumstances, personalities, and even styles are different, there are certain core principles that drive home the idea that leadership has definitive core values. The six traits of a successful police leader as outlined by Dr. Long (Caring, Competence, Credibility, Communication, Courage, and Collaboration) are found in each of their overviews and each of their speeches. When I think of other effective leaders I know I see these same six traits repeating themselves. It is my intention to make sure I use these same traits in my role as a police leader.

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      guttuso_fa@jpso.com

      Very good points. I did not really notice or think about the diversity of the group of leaders picked until I read your comment, I guess it shows that it doesn't matter what your background is or where you started, everyone has the potential to become a creditable and effective leader.

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    mtroscla@tulane.edu

    I found Patton's use of humor intermixed in his speeches particularly interesting as it changes the whole mood of the speech from just a few extra words.

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    cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

    I enjoyed the module and watching General Colin Powell's speech. He was the Chairman Of The Joint Chiefs Of Staff when I was a young marine in 1989. He was a man of integrity and loyalty. He was right when he said, "The day soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you stop leading them". I will remember this as I go forward in my daily duties as a leader and follow the six traits.

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    chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

    In the learning of area 3, module 6, learning the six traits to become a successful police leader were all very helpful. I do believe that all six are needed to show the full potential as a successful police leader. Because as credible leaders we have to be trustworthy , confident and take in full sense of accountability.

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    michael-beck@lpso.net

    The leaders shown in this segment were diverse, coming from multiple segments of society, and time, they all seemed to have a commonality of traits to include integrity, vision, courage, and a team spirit. They epitomize the characteristics of good police leaders; caring, competence, credibility, communication, courage, and collaboration. Their belief that the whole is greater than the individual showed the excellent teamwork stems from believing in their followers, giving them knowledge and skills to succeed, being able to share their vision and surrounding themselves with people who shared that vision, the fortitude to do the right thing, and unifying those who made everyone better.

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    Major Stacy Fortenberry

    Several of the leaders highlighted had the common belief of empowering your people to do their best. Giving them the self confidence to act independently. When I initially thought of Patton I did not think of him as an example of delegation. I especially liked his view of tell people what needs to be done not how to do it.

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      Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

      I took away the same concept from almost all of the leaders presented. I also took note of President Ronald Reagan's quote, "If we don't worry about getting credit we can get all things accomplished."

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    Henry Dominguez

    I liked how they highlight the six traits to become a successful leader, and really emphasized again the credibility of a good leader. A strong desire to lead by itself will not suffice but when you encompass these traits along with a genuine heart felt passion, that is what will make you a credible leader people will want to follow and listen to.

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    guttuso_fa@jpso.com

    the six traits seem to be right on target. I was intrigued by several parts that spoke about simplifying things. I believe one of the things that I have to work on is I tend to overthink things and dwell to much on decisions after I have made them. I also like President Reagan's point of view where you let people do what they do best. This is how I think. I try to surround myself with people who know about the things i don't and rely on their input.

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    ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

    It was great to hear so many perspectives of leadership from a wide array of leaders. I think the most important lesson is to treat people the way you would want to be treated. If you treat people right and show you care there are no limits on what can be accomplished.

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    cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

    As a leader of an organization it is important that the leader be able to build up to collaboration between the entire organization. Rudy Giuliani showed us this in his talk on leadership. He would not have been able to mount the response to 9/11 that he did without collaboration between all of the divisions that he oversaw.

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    dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

    Possessing numerous traits to be a successful police leader is key to success, no doubt. Just like truth and having integrity, I found that without being credible, no one will follow you or believe that you care about anything other than serving yourself. No one will care to collaborate with you on anything and anything you say will be assumed to be untruthful.

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    Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

    This lesson again reiterated the need for credibility as a police leader. The six traits outlined all build on one another and keep the people we lead at the center of the leadership circle. If we can genuinely care for our subordinates, are competent, credible, and courageous we can succeed at building a team capable of anything.

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      sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

      I agree every trait builds on one another. If starting with caring everything will fall into place.

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    As we look at the world today, the six traits that Dr. Long refers to play a big part in all of us. I chose a caring character. We all must care. In today's world, we all need to care just a little more about people. We need to go the extra mile to ensure their health and well-being.

    The other five are just as important and play their role in what we do to take care of staff.

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      blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree, and as in the module, you have to care to build the other traits. Caring for your people and what you stand for will ensure that you do great work to succeed.

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      steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

      Agree but you can have all the other traits, and without the genuine caring of the community and others, its for the wrong reasons.

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    dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

    These six traits hit home for a lot of different reasons, but in my opinion credibility and communication key. I think a lot of the conflict between police and the community is a failure to communicate on both sides, which leads to misunderstanding and then can lead to physical confrontations.

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      cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree that caring and effective communication are helpful in reducing conflict between law enforcement and the community. One of the things I love about one of our Community Outreach Projects, Citizens Academy, is that the community gets to see the passion and commitment from each and every division; they get to speak with someone from every major Department. Many who come in skeptical and defensive graduate the program as our biggest fans. They realize we all care about they community and want to make a difference.

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    blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

    I loved watching the videos of some of the great leaders of our time. It's essential to see the impact we can make on people lives by being great leaders. Each of the six traits are important, but you have to have caring first as a foundation to build the other characteristics. We have to care for our people and what we do to succeed.

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      wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

      I agree leaders must be truthful, provide honest feedback and take care of their followers while at the same time take care of the integrity of the organization

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    anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

    This lecture provided vital information that can be beneficial to developing all leaders. Great leader possesses the 6 traits of a successful leader and strive to display them in their daily job duties.

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    anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

    I agree, we must communicate more with the community. when we don't we leave them to develop their own assumptions.

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    sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

    I believe all 6 traits build off each other, but as long as you start with caring. Everything else can be taught or earned through experience. Also enjoyed Patton's speech. The towns he could not pronounce were definitely removed.

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    steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

    Looking at this and how each trait develops more from the one before, I would like to go back and train or improve on each characteristic at a time. With the understanding of the importance of the previous traits to be effective at the next is key. I have seen many leaders in the past and today, attempt to reach the final trait and have not mastered or understood some of the previous. Another task to add to the to do list at the end of this course.

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      I agree with you on how we must understand how the traits build off each other. Too often leaders want to expedite actions in order to please the rank and advance their personal careers instead of building the successful team and allowing that to be their catapult to success.

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    cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

    The six traits of successful police leaders (caring, competence, credibility, communication, courage and collaboration) all build upon each other to form the foundation of effective credible leadership. Additionally, when Rudy Giullani advised to ask yourself what are your weaknesses and then find someone who "does well what you don't do well"...helped put Exchange Theory in perspective. Too many times we try to surround ourselves with others like us; yet, a better strategy is to surround us with people who, when we are teamed up, our skills complement each other.

    One of the areas our organization can improve upon, is offering professional development for support staff. Perhaps we could work to share our special skill sets with each other so we are stronger as a team, and as an organization.

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    dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

    I think credibility is the root of effective leadership. If your subordinates can not trust you, they will not follow you. I think subordinates will stand behind a leader when they know the leader has their best interests at heart.

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      dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

      this is true. If you are not credible people will not follow you. you have to show that you can master this trait before you will be followed.

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    This module was interesting. In this module, it was stated that you should not be the smartest one in the room as a leader. In meetings, I often see people in leadership try to prove that they are the smartest person in the room. By doing that, they fail to listen to others and don't value others opinions. We should be able to build up each other to be successful as us or better than us. If we do that, the agency will thrive.

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      I like that too, since half the time I KNOW I am not the smartest guy in the room!! All joking aside, an ounce of humility, in the beginning, can definitely save you a pound of embarrassment in the future. Leaders must be opened minded and by possessing the 6 traits of a successful police leader these things will not be a concern to you.

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    clouatre_kj@jpso.com

    This was such an inspiring module. I really enjoyed watching the speeches of all of thse amazing leaders and learning more about their philosphies and styles. The six traits of an effective leader resonate and make sense to me. I believe that these are the traits I strive to possess as a leader every day.

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    Adam Gonzalez

    Inspiring in so many ways because of the various people explaining what success is to them and how they achieved it, this module demonstrated excellent values in order for us as public safety professionals to embrace and to emulate if we are to achieve our righteous and service-oriented goals and endeavors. The Six Traits of a Successful Police Leader led the charge in showing forth precisely what is needed to reach the levels of accomplishment and credibility by universal standards. But again, I enjoyed most of all learning from those successful leaders, in their own words, how they reached the heights that they attained.

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      mmoscona@floodauthority.org

      I agree with your comments. I enjoyed hearing in their own words, these leader's thought processes on how they became successful and what they thought of their followers.

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    This was a very informational module. For me, it ties up or connects some of the previous modules. The advice that Mr. Welch gives, I remember getting from mentors, and somewhere along the way it has faltered a bit. I still try to over deliver, when given an assignment or task, but I have seen that change based on situation or fatigue. The point that I need to work on is showing a positive mental attitude. Many times I do have a positive attitude, but I don't always show it, when in a hurry or trying to organize the day.

    I did enjoy the look at many leaders. Some of it was refreshing to see, when they were in their prime, pushing forward, in the world.

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    dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

    In this module we are presented with the six traits of a successful police leader. To be a successful leader you need to be mindful of these and work towards mastering them. All traits are intertwined and build on each other. the most important of these in my eyes is communication. Without communication you can not express the remaining traits.

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    This module provided us with overviews and insight into how several successful and effective leaders processed thoughts and made them realities. They were able to obtain their personal goal communicating their dreams and goals, and inspiring their subordinates to be part of the change. As leaders at our respective agencies, it vital that we encourage and motivate our subordinates to strive for greatness and to be part of the greater good. The six traits of a successful police officer provided us with a guide on how to ensure we become effective leaders.

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    mmoscona@floodauthority.org

    I don't think that a leader can be totally effective unless that leader can demonstrate skill in all 6 of the traits. It's interesting to me how each of the traits overlap to make the next trait stronger. I would have to say, just like the study found, that communication is the area that I personally need the most work on. I don't have a problem communicating, I just don't always communicate in an effective manner.

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    Lt. Mark Lyons

    This was a very interesting training module. I enjoyed hearing the stories of some of the greatest and influential people of our time. One of the things I agree with and liked the most is the answer from Jack Welch on his advice to "over deliver".

    I began practicing this concept a long time ago. I believe that in order to separate yourself from the rest of the pack, you must go above and beyond. You must always deliver more than what was asked of you. To provide so much value in what you contribute, that you are considered essential to the organization.

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    This module is a good follow up for providing tangible items to see and include for great leadership. The videos that show each highlighted speaker/leader give a speech that portrays their effectiveness as orators. It gives the student the chance to see the speakers use and perfect their respective crafts. The six traits are universally accepted as good traits in effective leaders. I hope to be able to mirror the skills and ideas used here today in my future career.

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      Sergeant James Schueller

      I agree, several examples from a wide variety of figures just helped illustrate the traits we are studying. They laid the groundwork for the six traits discussed at the end that we need to focus on as we move forward.

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    wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

    This was a very good training module, police officers now, more than ever needs to make this their mantra. A police officer without credibility is pretty much useless. In law enforcement, dishonesty no matter how large or small is the quickest way to kill a law enforcement career

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    Using the examples of all the different types of leaders and from such different professions shows that anyone can be a leader if they have the drive to do so. They all held a vast understanding of themselves and of the people they influenced and never took either for granted. I particularly like Jack Welch's three steps, always give more than asked, be positive, and don't rub your ambitions in other people's faces. Simple concepts, yet powerful words.

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    Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

    The 6 traits for effective leadership are the same traits we should use for a successful marriage and life. I feel communication is the most important trait because if you possess all of the other traits and cannot effectively communicate, you look weak and incompetent.

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      Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

      Agreed, Oubre
      Communication plays a huge role in both marriage life and our work environment. and with out this skill it will never work out to it's fullest.

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      Deputy Mitchell Gahler

      Although communication is very important, credibility defined appears to be the most important to me. Without credibility, people will not follow you, thus communication will be non-existent. Communication can be negative or positive, but without positive credibility, there would be difficulty to communicate regarding conflict and providing influence.

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      Lt. Joseph Flavin

      I've seen the importance of effective communication come up numerous times now in these modules because of how important it is. If you can't communicate with others than your message will always get lost in translation. The leadership traits are certainly transferrable to life in general.

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    Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

    This module discusses how law enforcement officers can be successful and describes the six traits to success. To become a good leader, you need to utilize and work toward mastering those traits. The six traits mentioned all work together and builds you into the leader you should be. Of the six traits, I believe that communication is the most important of them all. Without communication, you cannot move forward and be successful.

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    Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

    Dr. Long presented a great overview of nine credible leaders that impacted our country in some way. D. Long also discussed six powerful traits of a successful leader. After reviewing this module, I can relate to several of the characteristics and also realized there are some I can improve on. Leadership is about continuing to grow and learn.

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      Eduardo Palomares

      I also reflected on the areas I most need improvement on. I was fascinated by General Patton. This module really keyed on why certain traits are required for effective leadership. Leadership is a life long journey for all of us. Sometimes I have been annoyed by my troops calling me about certain calls for service. But after styling this module this made me realize they see me as a problem solver. I now see the bigger picture.

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        Maja Donohue

        I agree that getting called about simple things can be annoying at times, but then I remind myself that each call is an opportunity to develop that employee and make them more confident to make decisions on their own. If they are calling us it means that they still need us to solve problems, and like General Powell said, that is a good thing.

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    Lt. Marlon J Shuff

    The commonality of these nine successful leaders is the value they placed on the people in their organizations. Colin Powell summed this up when he stated, "And the role of a leader is to put PEOPLE in the best possible environment to achieve the purpose of the organization." They all nine realized that to be successful, they had to surround themselves with capable people, care for them, reward them, support them, train them, equip them, and have their best interests in mind. In return, they would perform at a high level and achieve the goals of the organization.

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    Deputy Mitchell Gahler

    In this module, Long discussed many key objectives towards the development of effective leadership. The six leadership traits also put in perspective the importance of how we can improve to be the most credible law enforcement professionals. General Colin Powell stated, “The day soldiers stop bringing you their problems, is the day you have stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence that you can help or concluded that you don’t care. Either case is a case of a failure of leadership.” This quote resonated with me providing me with the importance of communication and to pay attention to those you lead.

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      Colin Powell's message also resonated with me. Often times when I am busy and I get people stopping in my office I sometimes tend to be a little shorter with them. This statement is going to help me refocus and get me thinking that the reason they may be coming in is that they know I am competent and willing to help. I guess I would rather be busy and have them stopping in because they believe in what I am going to tell them.

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    Lt. Joseph Flavin

    Learning about these 9 effective and successful leaders was very enlightening. Each leader had key traits and values that helped them achieve success. The common theme appeared to be their focus on making those around them better. Vince Lombardi said, "Leaders are made, not born." We are seeing how they are made with every passing module. It's important that we as leaders continue to build up those around us to achieve organizational success.

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    In this module, I really keyed in on General Colin Powell's statement that he likes to go through life looking through the windshield and not the side mirrors or rearview mirror because you can't change those things. I think this is a really good analogy. Often times we do go through life and think about or dwell on the past. Often times we can't change what has happened in the past but we can change the future or at least have input on where we are going in the future. If we always think this way I think we will be more positive and forward thinking.

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      Gregory Hutchins

      Another takeaway from Colin Powell's speech is never let your ego get close to your position, for when the job is gone, so is your ego. While there are many similar comments to this by others, it is perfect to hear it from a General. Too often, we deal with retired members of our profession that still hold onto the fact they served and use that as a justification to drive a personal agenda. The basis for their decisions or thought processes is that they are using archaic or outdated ways to do things. Few understand the challenges we experience. Due to not letting go of their ego, they turn into a source of trouble through complaints, repetitive unwarranted calls for service, or the requirement for law enforcement action upon themselves.

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    Sergeant James Schueller

    This module gave several good examples of effective leadership by spotlighting numerous well-known figures from General Patton to Greg Norman. As I have noted in previous discussion boards and essays, I am a fan of quotes, and this module had several. Sam Walton's "None of us is smarter than all of us", Vince Lombardi's "There is only one way to succeed in anything, and that is to give it everything" , to General Powell's "Look through the windshield instead of the rear-view mirror". All are inspiring quotes that serve to highlight what effective leadership looks like. I also liked that the module closed with the Six Traits of Successful Police Leaders, in that it brought everything back into focus as to why we are participating in the course work, and what we hope to take from it for ourselves, our agencies, and the people we serve.

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    Kyle Phillips

    I find it interesting that the great leaders in this module had similar characteristics but represented a variety of people and backgrounds. I also really liked the quote from General Collin Powell regarding looking at life through the windshield, rather than through the back and the sides. I think hindsight can be a good reminder and training tool, but staying focused on the present and future will aid in keeping you in step with the pulse of the organization.

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    Sergeant Chad Blanchette

    This is the first time I have seen Rudy Giulani speak on leadership and I was very impressed with his message and his professionalism. It was interesting to see him in his prime as compared to where he is at today. I guess there is a possibility that he truly believes the message that he is relaying today.

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      Sergeant Durand Ackman

      I had the same thoughts on Giuliani. I had never seen him speak about leadership and it seems to be a far stretch from seeing him speak today. I really enjoyed listening to the video of him included in this module though.

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    Eduardo Palomares

    Effective leadership encompasses very important traits which are key in order to project credibility. While all the traits are important, caring , courage and competence stood out for me. An effective leaders cares for the people in the organization and does not allow personal feelings to influence his or her perception and have the courage to stand up against injustice. Additionally, competence is very important in order to display and practice effective leadership. The troops seek out your guidance and expect leaders to effectively assist them in solving problems. I was fascinated by General Patton's leadership and accomplishments. Effective leadership also requires humility to accept that others have great contributions to drive positive change.

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    Ryan Manguson

    I think Jack Welch had three great pieces of advise for effective leadership.
    1) Over deliver
    2) Have a positive attitude
    3) Be privately ambitious
    You can never go wrong by delivering more than asked. A positive mental attitude will take you far. It's ok to have ambitions but don't make it so that is the first thing people think about when they think about you.

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      Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

      I like your point LT, you can never go wrong by over delivering. Your message about a positive attitude I think is bases for all 6 of the traits described. For me a positive attitude is the fuel behind my drive.

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    Sergeant Durand Ackman

    The 6 traits of effective leadership were interesting as all of them are important and a case can be made for each of them being more important than the others. My opinion is Credibility is the most important as the leader must be seen as truthful, responsible, fair, etc. They must admit mistakes and be patient for their employees. The different videos from various leaders were inspiring. I liked the quote from Giuliani about if you don't know where you're going, you can't lead your people.

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      I agree with Sgt. Ackman, without credibility, you can be good at all the other traits but you will not have the true influence and trust needed to be successful. Sgt. Ackman also mentioned how important it is to be able to admit mistakes. It has been my experience that this is critical for maintaining credibility. People are not perfect. We are not perfect leaders. We make mistakes. Our subordinates know when we make mistakes. When a leader genuinely admits their mistakes, subordinates know that they are humble and they are willing to forgive the leader. When a leader glosses over the issue as if nothing happened, they chip away at their creditability and believability.

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    Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

    I appreciate how this module compounded the importance of each leadership trait and let it flow into the next. Highlighting some of histories greatest leaders was a great move in this module, it pulled me in. From Patton to Lombardi's approaches to leadership they were all very diverse yet very effective. The one thing that i noticed about all of the speakers was how genuine they were.

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      Sergeant Paul Gronholz

      I completely agree. Being authentic and credible is extremely important. Leaders must be genuine when working with people. If not, those they lead will be able to see right through their lack of authenticity and they won't be able to lead effectively.

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    Sergeant Paul Gronholz

    I enjoyed all 9 of the leadership profiles that were detailed in this module. I fear that Guiliani's leadership abilities have come into serious question and I wonder how he is going to recover from what's happened recently. He spoke at length about having beliefs/convictions and sticking to them. He demonstrated that with his role in the recent election, although I believe he made a choice to commit to a person rather than to his beliefs.. He made a choice to question the election and fought the results with everything he had. Unfortunately, he came out on the losing end and his legacy will likely be tarnished because of what's happened. I think it's a good lesson for all of us to learn. Leaders will come and go, we must hitch our wagons to the truth, justice, and fundamental fairness.

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      Christopher Lowrie

      Well said Sergeant Gronholz. Unfortunately a lot of the great things he accomplished with be forgotten about. Guiliani made a great point about weaknesses. I thought he was going to advise people to address their weaknesses and figure out how to get better. Instead he advised if your your 2nd or 3rd do well in an area that you are weak in, have them do it. That doesn't mean you won't try to better yourself. It shows you know your weaknesses but are also a good leader to put people in the right places to make the organization better.

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    Samantha Reps

    This lesson offered us a chance to better understand various other leaders. General George Patton said "Never tell people how to do things, tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity." This is something I would like to try more with staff when the situation is appropriate.

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      Sergeant Kelly Lee

      I think this is a great concept the General had in that you don't always need to do the job yourself or show someone how to do it simple give them the tools and knowledge needed to complete the task and watch them do amazing things. Interesting concept!

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        Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

        I agree, sometime we reap better results from building up our people to take on additional roles and responsibilities.

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      I agree. I would add that this can be hard for many public safety leaders. IT requires that the leader give up some control. Doing so can also allow your people to grow and develop.

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    I really enjoyed this presentation. This was a great opportunity to review the leadership traits of a diverse set of influential leaders. While all had great points, three were particularly interesting. First, I appreciated General Patton's statement "never tell people how to do things, tell them what you want them to do and they will surprise you". As a military veteran, this was the cornerstone of leadership. Traditional leaders want to spell everything out. I have found that if you have developed your subordinates and trust them, they should be prepared to be problem solvers. Second, was President Reagan and Jack Welch's belief in reducing bureaucracy and micromanagement. the bureaucratic levels within an organization can stifle creativity and alienate leaders from their subordinates. This can negatively effect problem solving and impede success. Last was General Powell's leadership approach of Train, Educate, equip, commend and disciple. If a leader does these things, they will develop others, praise the accomplishments of others and be consistent in how they treat others. As Dr. Long put it in his conclusion, all the leaders examined highlighted trust, caring, courage, experience, and communication as being critical to their success.

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    Sergeant Kelly Lee

    Again I think this module continue to drive home the whole concept/theory of what we need to be great, effective, respected leaders. The basics of the 6 traits of a successful police leader lay out a good foundation for building yourself and your organization. In looking at those traits I personally think that #6 credibility is the most important one to have. If you are not viewed as credible or trustworthy by your organization then you will find everything you try to accomplish being an up hill battle due to not having support or buy in from anyone.

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    Maja Donohue

    Once again I was reminded that credibility is the foundation of leadership. Although all six traits of a successful police leader are necessary to be effective, credibility in my opinion is required for the rest to be relevant. I also enjoyed the nine leadership perspectives and the way that each of them discussed what leadership means to them. I found that they all had a couple of themes in common. Namely, a positive attitude, even in the face of failure, seemed to make the difference between learning from a mistake and being discouraged to try again. They all had a purpose or a set of values they attributed their success to. And finally, they all treated others with the utmost respect and dignity.

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    Major Willie Stewart

    One of the quotes that stood out to me was “Never tell people how to do things, tell people what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.” I think many leaders can learn from the information in this presentation. This was another statement I felt spoke volume “let people do what people do best.” Value, vision, integrity, goals, igniting change, and transformational leadership are all traits of successful police leaders that appeared at the end of the module in a reflection of the successors discussed in this module. Many leaders discussed in this module are caring leaders and competent leaders. They also allowed input, influence and feedback of their followers. Each leader discussed had ambition, drive and determination. As police leaders we must also remember that communication is also very important in reaching those who depend on us for leadership.

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      Timothy Sandlin

      I agree, effective communication is essential. So many times information may be relayed or transferred; this information may be complete or incomplete of the exact facts or data. However, while it lessens effectiveness when facts are missing, it can also be incredibly damaging if intent, tone, or nature of information is lost in the transfer process. This impacts on our ability to effectively communicate. And, of course, what has been mentioned many times in our modules we must also Listen, Listen, Listen as leaders to enhance our ability to effectively communicate.

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    Christopher Lowrie

    It was great to see the old footage of General Patton. It reflected on a time of unity and pride in this country that I hope we can return to. I enjoyed Colin Powell's presentation as well. Every good leader needs to have the courage and follow through on Powell's quote, "the good followers know who the bad followers are and they are waiting for your to do something about it." Leaders need to address problems or make them go away from the organization.

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      Great quote from Gen. Powell. Having great leadership qualities to be able to lead people out of the organization takes all of the 6 qualities as well. Anyone can fire someone, but doing it with compassion is an art because everyone watches (or hears) how that one person was treated when they leave (or told to leave) an organization.

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        Unfortunately "firing" someone in our profession is extraordinarily difficult. It is hard to display great leadership when there are people in your organization that seem to make it their mission to re-rail us. Frustration.

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    Interesting listing to a dynamic group of leaders speak. All possessing slightly different point of views on how to achieve success as a leader. But all possessing the same traits needed for success.

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    Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

    I enjoyed this module and the leadership perspective and expertise from proven winners! I am again provided with inspiration from this class!

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    I am a huge Colin Powell and Greg Norman fan, so listening to them speak (again) was great. Covering the 6 traits was a great reminder to what I have learned so far in this course. One point that stood out, and unless I missed it somewhere else, was a great point on Competence; successful police leaders need to have BOTH great leadership AND management abilities. We normally focus on leadership qualities and usually hear managers don't make great leaders...and they don't without solid leadership abilities, but great leaders still need to manage their own and their followers efficiency.

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    Effective leadership is a culmination of the previous practices when employed at their highest levels. It shows compassion for what you do, the people your surrounded by and the reason you all aim to fulfill a purpose. The highlighted leaders used to demonstrate the idea of exceptional leadership were for the most part exceptional examples. It also helped to put a “real” feeling to the topic of the module.

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    This lesson also described and discussed how important credibility is to be a strong leader. Getting buy in from others that believe you want what is best for them and the organization is very important and also very challenging. I also learned in this lesson that it is important to make it clear what you want to accomplish and what you expect, but you also have to trust your employees or followers and let them accomplish goals the best way they can. If you let them know that they trust them and that they are valued, they are likely to surprise you with what the end result will be. Employees that feel like they matter, will likely go above and beyond what is asked of them.

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      3:20 am? That's dedication, Kari!

      Trust the people and get out of their way. Credibility is obviously huge in leadership or I dare say the term wouldn't keep reappearing. Care, be competent, communicate, have courage, and collaborate; sounds good to me!

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      Andy Opperman

      Many of these great leaders have not been around for decades yet they figured out how to lead people. They talk about trusting their people to innovate yet in law enforcement we have struggled as leaders at times to let go of that authority. The goal in the present and in the future is really to get our employees to go above and beyond as you said. This is where we truly innovate.

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        Sgt. Shawn Wilson

        Agreed and tied in with the following module of incremental v deep change. In law enforcement it always feels like we take incremental change because we are afraid as leaders to incur any risk; this is stifling our people.

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    I found his module to be very interesting and informative. Bringing some top-shelf leaders in for their perspectives is always good learning.

    I took a course through the Professional Development Academy previously and Colin Powell was one of the main speakers. I also received a signed copy of his book after graduating. His experiences are very close to what we as law enforcement leaders experience so his message resonated with me. In his book, It Worked For Me, you'll read about the "13 Rules." I strongly recommend the reading for any leader. They touched on one briefly in this module, "avoid having your ego so close to your position that when your position falls, your ego goes with it." I try to remember this statement as often as I can. Basically, we're all passionate about our ideas, when our idea doesn't move forward, let it go-don't let it ruin your day.

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      Nicole Oakes

      I enjoyed Colin Powell's video too. I will look for his book so that I can read it. I agree and get his message.

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      As Gen. Collin Powell stated that he does not concern himself with with what is behind him, and remains forward thinking. Some individuals that become offended when their ideas are not used, are somewhat narrowminded and may not see the big picture. It is our responsibility that if we do not use an idea from someone that we do explain the reasoning behind the decision.

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    Timothy Sandlin

    In this module we took a practical look at some influential leaders and how they demonstrated certain traits and qualities. These leaders display traits that have been found to be effective in creating successful police leaders. This module again, reinforces what we have covered in several other modules and helps demonstrate validity. If you care; show you know what you are doing; are credible; can effectively communicate with others; and use your courage to do the right things you will be successful as a leader.

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    I really enjoyed Colin Powell's talk about having "purpose". It's so easy in law enforcement to forget what our "purpose" is. His speech fits nicely with Simon Sinek's "Start with Why". Just listening to the different videos made this one of my favorite modules,

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      Matthew Menard

      I too made this connection while listening to Powell's talk. In order to be successful we must truly understand what we want to achieve as leaders.

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    Nicole Oakes

    Everything presented in this module is a reoccurring theme. To be an effective leader you must be caring, competent, credible, able to communicate effectively, and courageous. Again and again, we are informed that these are the necessary traits to be an effective leader.

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    Andy Opperman

    I thought the inclusion of specific effective leaders in this module was great. It always important to see real life examples of leadership. You always learn something new when diving into history. I thought the many quotes included in the training were also great. Many of the leaders showed the common theme of developing their people and trusting them to act. General Patton was quoted as saying "Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity." Jack Welch also pushed for building employee's self-confidence. Many of these great leaders’ qualities are values-based qualities. It just goes to show that we can hire people in law enforcement from all career fields if they have strong character and we as leaders put the time in effort to their continued leadership development. The 6 traits of successful police leaders again cite effective communication, taking care of your people and collaboration. Again, as leaders we learn we cannot lead on our own. We need the support and buy in of the entire organization.

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      Robert Schei

      I enjoyed the segment on Jack Welch and found his 3 keys to success to be right on point. Over deliver, don't just answer the question the boss already knows the answer provide them with what they don't know. Have a positive attitude, people are attracted to positive people and avoid negativity. Don't be over ambitious - do the work, take time and learn. Out of all of the leaders presented in the lecture none of them became a successful leader overnight. It took consistent effort, reflection and improvement to become as successful as they all are.

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    Robert Schei

    The 6 traits of a successful police leader work in succession and build off from one another. The leader has to care and influence others to care for the organization. This trait begins the cycle and is where the passion for improvement begins. You have to care, be passionate about your purpose and be contagious - those around you will be infected by your passion for success and your organization will flourish.

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    Sgt. Shawn Wilson

    I enjoyed this module and its inclusion of General Patton. General Patton was a great leader but not without controversy; the infamous slapping incident and when Eisenhower removed him from command of the 3rd Army for criticizing those higher than him. Always take care of your people as a leader and lead from the front. The inspiration that General Patton was able to instill in his people is amazing. Looking at General Patton through the lens of the 6 traits; Caring, Competence, Credibility, Communication, Courage and Collaboration he was able to harness all 6 to inspire his people to greatness.

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    Brad Strouf

    The "effective leaders" highlighted in this module were certainly chosen for obvious reasons. All have specific skill-sets, but undoubtedly are considered leaders in their respective fields. While my own personal values may not necessarily align with all chosen, I believe that this module provided a great example of leadership, both personal qualities and shared traits.

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    I found that Gen. George Patton's quote "never tell people how to do things, tell them what to do and they'll surprise you with their ingenuity" says a lot about his confidence and trust he had in his people. In some instances delegation can only be given to individuals that you do trust with the task. My belief is that times have changed from Gen. Patton's era to the present time. When Gen. Patton would give an order or delegate authority to others to be able to accomplish a mission or task. These individuals would move heaven and earth for Gen. Patton, no questions asked.

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    Matthew Menard

    Each one of the people highlighted in this module are successful leaders who also demonstrate the six traits of successful police leaders presented. I would suggest that these traits are universal and not simply applicable to the law enforcement field. These traits prove to be recurring themes shown over and over again with examples of great leaders. For someone to be a true master of leadership, they must make a conscious effort to be effective in each one of these areas and never stop working at taking care of the people they lead.

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    Gregory Hutchins

    As much as I am not a fan of Wal-Mart, or what it has become, the video on Sam Walton's values is interesting. Humility, as expressed in the adage none is smarter than all of us, speaks volumes for a profession or even an organization in crisis. The leader cannot resolve the issues; it must be by creating the environment to embody another of his views and do it with a group of people who believe in what you think. Too often, an organization forgets that achieving success requires people. Leaders tend to use blinders and fixate on the challenge in front of them. By pushing out their vision, to be forward-looking, the solution becomes more evident. If lost at sea, one will never see land if looking over the boat's side instead of at the horizon. To get positive success, the organization needs people committed to the organizational values and beliefs to support a specific goal. Additionally, even with the best people, one cannot achieve success without a leader that strives to enthusiastically live the six traits of caring, competence, credibility, communication, courage, and collaboration.