Command and Staff Program

ACE Track

Leadership and Power

Replies
224
Voices
116
Dr. Mitch Javidi
Instructions:  
  1. Post a new discussion related to the topics covered in this module.  Your post needs to provide specific lessons learned with examples from this module helping you enhance your leadership capacity at work.
  2. After posting your discussion, review posts provided by other students in the class and reply to at least one of them. 
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    Chris Corbin

    While I have long seen the important role that influence plays in successfully leading others, I did not, until I reviewed the material in this module, understand the role that power played in the leadership equation, nor did I know of the different types of power that allow a leader to influence another. After gaining a basic understanding of the five bases of power, I looked back on some of my past efforts, both those that ended successfully and those that ended with less than the desired results, and can in each case see how my use, or omittance, of one or more of the five bases of power contributed to the outcome. I look forward to applying this concept to help me produce the results I desire every time I set out in pursuit of a new initiative.

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      Frank Acuna

      I agree with you Chris, it is vital to understand the need to read the situation and apply the appropriate method. If you have an employee who is very knowledgable in their job function, whereas you are not, you cannot rely on your expert base of power. In this circumstance, you may need to apply one of the other bases, depending on the individual employee. Some employees react better to Reward or Legitimate power depending on what type of leader they perceive you to be.

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        sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

        I agree, all 5 basis of power have their function if used in the appropriate situation. Any attempt at using only 1 or 2 basis, will most probably lead to failure or an inefficient work environment.

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      Brian Johnson

      Chris, we all learn from the many leadership challenges we face on a daily basis. Recognize that being an effective leader is a result of growing daily and applying those lessons learned from subordinates, peers, and superiors. Everyone has leadership qualities, regardless of rank, being open to learning from others will make you a better leader. Remember, the John Maxwell quote, Leaders Develop Daily, Not in a Day! YOu have proven that you are a life-long learner of leadership.

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        Drauzin Kinler

        I agree with you Brian. We all face challenges being leaders and it is something that I think we will continue to have to develop our skills on. Soon enough generation Z people will begin to enter the workforce and bring new challenges as well. This is a never ending area of learning that will be required in order to remain an effective leader.

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        Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

        Brian, I agree with your comments, especially the quote by John Maxwell about leaders developing daily and not in a day. I feel that being an effective leader is something we need to work on everyday, it's not about going to leadership training and coming back a leader. We go to trainings and learn new ideas and tools, it's when we come back to our departments and implement what we learned is when the magic happens.

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          Sgt. Shawn Wilson

          Agreed. We can attend all of the leadership training that is being offered and send our personnel to the same. If the material being presented is not being reflected upon and continuously worked on, then we will become static as leaders and eventually fail our people. I whole heartedly believe that being a leader is a life-long journey with learning occurring each day that we allow it to occur.

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        Major Willie Stewart

        Brian, you are so true. There is leadership qualities in everyone as long as they are willing to listen and learn. You can't make a leader overnight but you can continue to teach them life long lessons.

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      Monte Potier

      I too have looked back at my efforts and now understand where I failed to properly use behavior regulation. With the tools I have received I know understand that employees all have unique power bases and I will have to change how each are handled.

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      Joey Prevost

      The module talked about how we only have the power others believe we have. I take that a step further and say we only have what others allow us to have. I also like to say that just because you have power over another, doesn't mean you have to use it.

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      Jarod Primicerio

      Definitely an eye-opener to the various five bases of power. It is interesting looking from another perspective and now understanding possibly how others react in our interactions. I do think that regardless of what we desire, you may not have the control you are hoping to have.

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    Kyle Turner

    I too appreciate the differentiation in the types of power and their long vs short term impacts. It provides a new perspective on what source of motivation is required to implement a lasting change within an organization. Having this perspective will allow me to better direct my efforts and pull from different resources to influence those around me.

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    Frank Acuna

    Understanding the various bases of power is important for a leader with a team of varying levels of experience. I have led teams with officers with more experience and time on than me, and some senior personnel may not see your power base as an expert. They may feel their expertise is greater than yours, however they may perceive you as someone who can reward them, use coercion or they may respect your legitimate power. Regardless of how they perceive you, true power comes from your ability to influence others. Leaders should strive to positively influence those they lead, rather than lean on their rank or title for influence. Influence is gained from trust and trust is gained from forming professional relationships with those you lead.

    Frank

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      Magda Fernandez

      Frank i really liked your post. I agree wholeheartedly with you when you say Influence is gained from trust and that trust is based from forming professional relationships with those you lead. It is so important to have those relationship with people. As leaders, Empowering people to do jobs, tasks or projects gives them the opportunity to do so much that otherwise they wouldn't be able to do. It helps build that trust and credibility amongst people and teams. It also gives you credibility as a leader.

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      You summed this module up perfectly Frank. Its funny how a person can be perceived one way until people get to know them. Developing those professional relationships is the key to understanding each other.

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      Paul Brignac III

      Frank I have made the same observations during my career. I have witnessed leaders excel that had considerable less time on the job, or experience, than those that they led. I believe that the reason they achieved this power was because they were recognized as an expert, despite having less experience. It is certainly possible for a leader to be viewed as an expert, and be able to positively influence others, even if they have spent much less time developing their skills.

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    Brian Johnson

    The five bases of power: Reward, Coercive, Expert, Referent, and Legitimate can all be manipulated by both the person with the power and those being influenced. As discussed during this module, they are all situational and require leaders to adjust and adapt to the circumstances and those individuals that are directly and/or indirectly involved. The foundation for using this power is trust while understanding that your actions and decisions will be perceived based on how you use your influence and power. This can be both positive and negative depending on the individuals or group(s) you are interacting with. Your positional power (rank) is very important to understand because of the added perception of your power and how that will be perceived based on our rank. The higher your rank the more sensitive you need to be with your bases of power. Understanding the relationship with those within your organization while balancing your power during any given situation can enhance or minimize your actual power within your organization. Leadership is about influence, do your best to make it a positive experience and you will build and increase your influence. Much easier said than done!

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      Nancy Franklin

      Great post Brian! It is very true that the higher your rank in an organization, but more cognizant you must be about how others will perceive you. It is important for leaders at all levels to understand that employees look to them for examples of how to behave, so it is critical to set the bar high. Understanding the five bases of power is also important to knowing how the message leaders send - whether through actions or words - will be received.

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      Chris Corbin

      Brian, I especially like your closing comment that leadership is about influence and that it is much easier said than done to make every contact a positive experience as that will help you build your influence. As much as one might prepare for a difficult conversation with a peer or subordinate with the absolute intent of being positive, constructive and fully focused on providing the support necessary for personal and professional growth, I have found that there are some individuals that for one reason or another choose not to accept the assistance you are trying to provide. When this occurs, it seems to only leave legitimate and coercive power available for your use, which for me are the last two forms of power that I prefer to use. And that's exactly why it's much easier said than done.

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    Monte Potier

    After viewing this lecture I now have a better understanding of why I received different behaviors from different employees. I now realize that for some employees I will have to use different strategies to receive the behavior that is needed to accomplish my departments goals. This "behavior regulation" will make me a better leader and will help me advance my departments goals and objectives.

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    Joey Prevost

    I like to think that we all enter a leadership role wanting our employees to react to us with Internalization, because it is the right thing to do. I have had bosses that I identified with and wanted to emulate. I have also had some that I only complied with to avoid repercussions. While sometimes inevitable, I believe that all of us would like to avoid the latter.

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      Jason Porter

      No doubt we would like to avoid the latter, we have the same situations here. I have had some really great leaders that shared their goals and plans and then some that just said do this or do that. That wasn't the leader I wanted to be like.

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        ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

        I believe we have all worked for the "do as I say not as I do" type of boss or supervisor. This mentality has to change.

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      Lance Landry

      I would agree with your statement Joey. We all want them to respond and obey because they believe it is the right thing to do. I do add that we must work as leaders to achieve this.

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      Donnie

      I discovered early on in my military career which type of leader I would rather associate. I had many that shaped the style I would use one day. I agree that the ones that berated a message or order would only get enough to satisfy their demand.

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      Lt. Mark Lyons

      I agree. I have worked for a few bosses that I had a great deal of respect for and others who I thought should never be in charge of anything or anyone. I remember one of my supervisors actually telling me that he didn't have to know what to do on a specific matter, that his only job was to make sure that it got done. He didn't care who did it, or even if they did it right. When I asked him if the person who does the job does it wrong, who is at fault. His response was that it would be their fault for not doing it right. Even though he was the supervisor, he felt he had no obligation to learn how to perform this specific job.

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    Jason Porter

    The module spoke about power and how it is used in leadership. The different types of power were interesting to me. I see those types of power being applied in my agency all the time. The reward power is rarely used since really no one has the power to reward other than the sheriff. But the expert, coercive and referent power all are used throughout the agency.

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      Jarvis Mayfield

      Jason I disagree, I think the reward power can be used by any person within a department. I believe as a supervisor to show your employees rewards to have the employee buy into your system. I you buy each of my employees a birthday cake. Who knew a small thing like a cake would make such a big impact.

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    Nancy Franklin

    The concepts presented in this lecture regarding the five bases of power: reward, coercive, expert, referent, and legitimate are important for a leader to understand because these can set the foundation for how they are perceived by their followers. To achieve true legitimacy as a leader, one must operate from a place of authenticity at all times. This works to build trust and lays the foundation for the manner in which leaders accomplish objectives through the use of these bases of power. Each can be manipulated to achieve results and all can be used in ways that are respectful in order to achieve intended objectives. It is important to for leaders to recognize that subordinates are always watching and will often mimic behavior - good, bad or indifferent. Leaders must also respect these bases of power and use them appropriately - not as a means of punishment or force. Even though coercive power may have a negative connotation in the use of the word alone, this type of power can be utilized in positive ways. Leaders must adapt to the situations and individuals with whom they are attempting to influence. Leaders are not the only members who utilize bases of power - one does not have to specifically hold rank to use these bases of power to influence others.

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      Dan Wolff

      Nancy Franklin,
      As I read your post, words that stuck out in my mind that you used were; perception, authenticity, trust, manipulation, respect, adapt. Absolutely agree in your choice of words describing the use of power as related to being an effective leader. Even though each situation or individual may have differences, using this approach only sets you up for success in applying leadership and power. Your post was extremely helpful in further understanding this module.

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    Dan Wolff

    As the module states “Power” does not guarantee influence, but it is relational and the amount you have is the perception of your follower. By perception, it will be directly be related on the basis of power you have influenced over another. Do they see you as a way to be rewarded, punished, knowledge, role model or truly believe you have the power to control their behavior? Each person you lead may perceive you differently and we see this in every department in our organization. By knowing your people, you will recognize what area of power you have influenced on them because sometimes you may lead others that have more time vested in the organization. Given this, using the 5 principles defined will help immensely to stay consistent with the people you lead.

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    Drauzin Kinler

    In this module, I reflected back to the book, "It's Your Ship," and noted how Abrashoff utilized all of the Bases of Power as his lead the USS Benfold to being the best ship in the Navy. Abrashoff was a brilliant leader who used the bases of power effectively to obtain the goals that he wanted to achieve for his subordinates. It is very important as leaders that we use the bases of power wisely. Using the wrong base of power or just using one can have a dramatic effect on your ability to lead. As I continue through the modules in the leadership training, I continue to learn new techniques that I will adopt as I grow into becoming a better leader.

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    Mike Brown

    The influence and using power is and can be dangerous. Power in the wrong hands can not only hinder but hurt an organization. Coercive power has been used in my department and the outcome for most was devastating, People began forming clicks and those having legitimate power through the rank structure was shutdown by the clicks. So I understand how the use of power works in the wrong hands.

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      Lance Leblanc

      I would agree about the click comment. In the past thee in half years, it has been the worst I ever saw it in reference to clicks determining power. When a corporal in our agency is protected and can not be corrected because of his connection, then change is needed.

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      Brian Lewis

      I agree Mike and I have been the victim of coercive power. Not only did it kill my morale, but it ultimately made me leave that agency.

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    Jarod Primicerio

    This module was interesting and definitely provided a needed perspective regarding the bases of power and the correlating reaction. I believe I will now have an opportunity to reflect on my interaction with others in my Department and attempt to identify what power base we connect on. It will also assist me to identify those I work for to see what base or bases of power I am identifying with.

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    Henry Dominguez

    I thought this module had some great points. One of the things I took from it is that it is easy to lead. Anyone can take a group or individual and tell them what to do or how to do it. However, adding in the "WHY" makes you a leader. Being a true leader is someone who is willing to go into "battle" with their shift, who can delegate appropriately and is will make a decision (right or wrong). Additionally these leaders are also willing to admit fault. I have seen multiple times situations where a shift supervisor is not willing to relinquish control of a scene even though there are others there that have more knowledge about the situation. For example, I have seen supervisors who are making decisions on major injury or fatal traffic collisions and those decisions are wrong. All the supervisor had to do was ask one of the officers on their shift who had been in traffic for years and they would have come up with a much better game plan. Unfortunately the supervisors pride got in the way, which ultimately made the work that much more extensive.

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      Chasity Arwood

      I agree with you. Just telling employees what to do because you power, does not make you a leader. A true leader must be trusted. The "why" lets all employees know the goal of the organization.

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    Magda Fernandez

    This lectured provided me with a better understanding of how power is used and how it can easily be manipulated. Gave me a better understanding of why people do certain things at least in my organization and how they manipulate their “legitimate” power to further their personal agendas. It is important to understand the power we use, when we use it, and how we use it will have a lasting effect in our organization and its members. I have seen the misuse of power to benefit personal agendas and the rippling effect it in an organization can be crippling and demoralizing. Understanding the power and the influence we can have over people is incredible and ensuring we implement it in positive ways and give people positive experiences can truly help the influences we have within our members, organization and community.

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    Lance Leblanc

    This module provided different kinds of powers and broke them down. The lecture definitely gave me a different insight into this subject. Principle 4 of the lecture stands out for me "don't over-regulate behavior." How often is this done? In my department, I have witnessed the miss-use of power and how it has negatively affected the rank and file.

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    Chasity Arwood

    This section discussed the bases of power. A person who has the power is not always respected. Trust must be built with employees and power must not be used for personal gain. I have witnessed the misuse of power within my own department. The misuse of power leads to loss of respect. When new leaders take over, all of their decisions are questioned due to the mistrust from previous administrations.

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      David Cupit

      I agree with you Chasity, respect and trust must be earned. In any type of relationship many times we must pay for the actions of the one who came before us. Expert power i think fits here the best.

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      Travis Linskens

      I agree that trust and respect is earned and not automatically given by those we lead. It's important that we remember that as leaders and also realize we can lose both trust and respect much quicker than it is earned.

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    David Cupit

    Very good lecture. I have seen all 5 types of power all around me in my career, i would have to say that referent is the easiest to deal with, It is nice to have someone follow your orders because they trust you and know you will not lead them astray.

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      Judith Estorge

      I agree that referent power is ideal. To have subordinates follow orders without issue because they know you have their best interest as well as the departments is rewarding. Trust can be lost easily if not taken seriously and protected.

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      Colby Stewart

      I agree with you your job as a supervisor is much easier when your staff trust you and know that you would not lead them astray.

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    Brian Lewis

    This module had me reflecting on which 5 bases of power I routinely fall under. It's clearly a combination of all 5, but in certain circumstances, I feel I gravitate to one more than the others. Having a better understanding now will help make sure I am using the appropriate level of power for the circumstance and not reverting to the most comfortable one for me.

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    Judith Estorge

    The 5 bases of power explain our influence over those we supervise. My agency, as any other I'm sure, covers each base of power in various methods. Coercive power was one of the most used for one particular leader and was known to be swift and without cause. Reward power was reserved for those in favor and could change on a moments notice. Consistency and fairness are key to anyone in a position of authority but more often power goes to their head.

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      Clint Patterson

      You are so correct, I feel that the coercive power is used by at least one or more persons in every agency and we can all identify them. They do at times juggle between the coercive and reward power at times, but they hardly ever remain consistent. The power trip definitely goes to their head.

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    Colby Stewart

    The bases of power, I believe that someone who is placed in a leadership role but who doesn't have the trust or respect of their troops has lost the power to lead. These type of leaders are a cancer to any department and only make their decisions on what is best for them. I worked for a supervisor years ago and he would always talk about how he did things and solved issues and he never gave the people who worked for him credit he even took another supervisors idea on how to solve a problem and presented as his own. He was disliked by staff and know as a liar.

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      Laurie Mecum

      I agree Cody, I too worked for someone that took the credit for everything that was done. Took awhile for people to catch on to him but eventually I left and he was fired. He had zero respect for anyone in our department or the workplace for that matter.

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    Clint Patterson

    Power is sought to control and determine the future of agencies and organizations. I have learned in this module that you don’t have to be rank or hold some prestigious awards to retain power. But to influence behaviors, either positive or negative, you must learn to utilize the bases of power properly. Referent power seems to be the one I use most in life and at work. Influencing others to be like you is very powerful and uplifting. When you communicate with someone, and they open themselves up in trusting you as a leader, this can be relational effectiveness, and they are likely to change.

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      Christian Johnson

      I agree, Clint.

      It goes back to the previous lessons that stress the need to lead by example.

      It is not a coincidence that we keep seeing that in module after module.

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    Laurie Mecum

    This module on the different levels of power was very informative. All too often people with power do not use it correctly. We see abuse of power all the time in organizations across the country. Most time people are placed in positions and given power that have clue about how to use it or they use it for their own gain.

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      Ray Bonillas

      Mecum,
      I could not agree more with your post. Some individuals promote and suddenly believe they have the power to make the decision through coercion. They are not true leaders within an organization they are authoritarians, which causes resistance within little buy-in. These individuals obtain their power from the fear of their employees.

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      David Ehrmann

      Some leaders also forgot where they came from. Before being in the position they are in, they would complain about leaders before them; yet now they have the same power, they act in the same manner as the leaders they so despised. Leaders need to self-refect and ascertain how that past leader's actions that they disliked compare with the way they lead today.

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      cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

      Laurie:
      You are so right, power is misused quite often. I think training people on the 6 power bases and reactions to power can be a useful tool in mentoring and developing leaders within any organization.

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      Samantha Reps

      There are far too many times when people are given power and they end up doing far to much damage. No organization needs to be run on fear.

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    Ray Bonillas

    This week’s lecture of the five Bases of Power (Reward-Coercive-Expert-Referent- Legitimate) was very informative. Many of us use these bases accordingly to achieve success based on the situation or relationship. As leaders, we must ensure we understand which of the bases we are utilizing in a particular situation to ensure it is a win for the organization and win for the employee, whether the employee reacts under compliance, identification, or Internalization.

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    Amanda Pertuis

    This module gave good information regarding the use of power. I agree that it is situational and that what works in one circumstance may not work in another. The Principles also gave good information.

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    David Ehrmann

    I enjoyed this module, especially on the bases of power. There are “leaders” within my organization that use coercive power to achieve their goals or the agency’s goals. Because of this, the response to that power by their people is compliance. They only do what they are told out of fear of punishment. I feel leaders often need to self-reflect and see what type base of power they possess or use to achieve the results they are seeking. A leader who only uses coercive power is less respected by their people and their peers alike.

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      Royce Starring

      I agree. I gave an order handed down to me to my guy one time and they did the task with minimal effort and outcome.

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    Samuel Lucia

    In regard to power and the capacity to influence, we often don't realize the impact our words have, even when our intention is not to have impact.

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      Kyle Phillips

      I agree Samuel, I feel that what you are saying is likely more so the case if the person who is feeling impacted, also has a great deal of trust in us, and is giving us referent power.

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    Royce Starring

    This lesson plan concentrated on power. It talks about how power is influence and the different type of power. I found reward power to be interesting.. In my opinion this is the most used form of power in law enforcement. For example, when officers interrogate suspects they always promise a reward to get a confession. On traffic stops officer have to power of rewarding offenders with a warning..

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    Christian Johnson

    I have never considered the different types of power until now.

    As I was listening to Dr. Long, I envisioned several of my own personal uses of each one. Some had drastic results that I did not foresee, just as he said they would.

    I have a much better understanding now and a better grasp on why some things work, why some things don't and why some things should be avoided in using power.

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      Roanne Sampson

      Chris, I did not understand how power worked as well. I agree that some types of power should be avoided.

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        Lieutenant John Champagne

        I feel that once we understand the different bases of power, we can better identify the satiation and style we need.

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        dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

        Don't know about completely avoid. It would have to be situational and depending on the person. Some people may only respond to certain powers. You have to know your people and know which person and situation to use these powers.

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      Rocco Dominic, III

      I thought the same thing, how many times have we use the different bases to have personnel complete their assignments.

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    Roanne Sampson

    I learned the different types of power (reward, coercion, legitimate, expert and referent) in this module. The reactions to power consist of compliance, identification and internalization. Power deals with influencing others behaviors. It seems as though leaders should not utilize coercive power at all times because it can lead to resignations. A leader must adjust his power approach because it's situational. One approach will not work every time and it can work differently on others. Reward power makes a lot of sense. Employees will figure out if the reward is worth it. As a leader, what kind of power do you use most often?

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    Rocco Dominic, III

    Watching this module made me realize how we as leaders use the 5 bases of power with our personnel. Sometimes it had positive results while other time it had negative outcomes.

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      Burke

      I agree. The power that we exert can help grow our organization or hurt it. It is up to us to make sure that we are influencing in a positive way.

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    mmcnab@spokanepolice.org

    “I am a Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPAC) evaluator and am testing the system”

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    Burke

    The power base system discussed in this module are accurate. Which one we use and how we influence has to be fluid and adaptable to the scenario.

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    Lance Landry

    We as leaders must influence our people. As leaders, we have each attained formal regulation by our respective employers. This formal regulation grants us the authority and responsibility (legitimate power) associated with the rank. However, we cannot truly attain influence without informal regulation. Specifically, this informal regulation is based on our employee’s perception of power (referent power) not dependent on a role as a supervisor. Their perception could also be based on how they view our knowledge (expert power) or thoughts and insights (informational power).

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    Donnie

    As leaders our every action and every word are scrutinized by our subordinates. The power bestowed upon us to issue orders or directives are great and leave lasting impressions. Law enforcement can literally use power to force a person do what they want. We teach in basic academies that this power is granted to us upon commission and that the weight it carries with it is profoundly great and easily abused. However, understanding that power is not defined in a basic academy the way it is in this module. I learned there are considerations for using our power and what works for one thing may not work for another and that effectiveness can change. I also learned that the power type you use to get your desired result may not yield what you thought it would. This power use affects our subordinates as well as the citizens we deal with on a day to day basis. Be careful.

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    McKinney

    This lesson was insightful and considering the various hats we wear in our profession, this “Leadership, and Power” style approach is relatively familiar with how particular individuals can be influenced to achieve objectives. I have found through my own experiences and seeing how other leaders incorporate success is through the practicality of referent and expert power. These styles appear to be more aligned with what leaders should possess to promote harmony within the ranks.

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      cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

      Power is the capacity of one person to influence another. I agree on expert power. I feel people respond well to this bases of power.

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    Lieutenant John Champagne

    This module helped me to realize the five bases of power (reward, coercive, expert, referent, and legitimate). A successful leader will be able to identify and utilize each of the five bases of power at different times to lead his or her team. I supervise a small team, and after reviewing this module, I realize I can use work in the area of coercive power. It’s always nice when you can identify areas you need growth.

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      Major Stacy Fortenberry

      I have seen the detrimental effect on an individual and an organization when the leader uses coercive and reward power as their go to way of influencing. It was not pretty and created an us against them culture.

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      Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

      This is a tool I have used in my 19 year career thus far. It did take time for me to notice the different ways to lead my team members but after listening to Dr. Long the big picture became clearer.

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    Major Stacy Fortenberry

    We all have probably worked for leaders who get stuck using only one or two power bases. Usually Legitimate and coercive. We should remember who this made is feel and what it failed to accomplish. It made us feel undervalued and it failed to have us become self motivated to go the extra mile. It brought about compliance but that was the end of it. Power bases are situational, relational and transitory. Use all in your tool bag but be wary of going coercive often.

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      there is no greater teacher than experience. I remember when I was a Sgt and had a "friend" who was a Lt. I walked through the squad room and said hello to him, but called him "Duggy." This was simply short for his first name. I had been calling him that for years and did so with a smile. He asked to speak to me in his office. When I entered he advised me that he did not appreciate me calling him dog excrement and that I should address him as Lieutenant . I have to this day called him Lt no matter what the circumstances, but I lost respect for him when we defined himself by his rank. I could understand in public or even in front of lower ranks or an Academy setting. But we were alone with noone else there. I have never forgotten than. I am fine if someone calls me Sgt. or Lt. even though I am a Capt. When I visit the south part of my parish where I taught DARE I am Deputy Day. I don't see that as an insult, it is a complement that they remember me. I always prefer respect over rank.

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        Lt. Marlon J Shuff

        I agree with comment about preferring respect over rank. I beleive this as well. Anyone can have positional authority, that's easy to obtain. To be respected by your peers is more difficult to earn.

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    cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

    Coercive power never has and never will work if you want a successful agency. All it does is create resentment, lack of respect, fear etc. It may accomplish what the leader wants done but it will eventually catch up to him/her and they will have big problems with their subordinates. Once you lose respect of your subordinates you are done as an effective leader.

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      jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

      I agree that no one ever likes coercive power and it never garnishes respect or success. Coming from a military background and seeing this first hand, allowed me the insight that I never wanted to use it if I were in a leadership role. You shouldn't punish someone just because you have the power to. If you really want respect, applying referent or expert power is the way to go.

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    jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

    Many organization probably use the 5th bases of Power, Legitimate Power. As discussed in this module, I agree that only using this bases of power will not grow your people to their full potential. They will do what they are asked, but as a leader you may find that this is all they will do. Conversely by using a more Expert and Referent base of power within an organization, you will inspire everyone around you.

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      agreed here, within a LEO agency, the hierarchy of rank and file will always exist. But, if you refer back to Capt. Abrashoff was able to keep Navy hierarchy intact as with tradition, using expert and referrent power, he morphed the ship/crew using innovative, but not out of bounds ideas to better the crew. When leaders can push and maximize their team using good power bases , it will trickle down and become infectious.

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    I think it is important to remember that there are different power bases. As was stated in the presentation different situations call for different approaches. Each power base has a reason it exists and at some point a reason for its use. That said, each also has consequences. It is important that everyone remember respect is necessary from everyone. Leaders are only leaders if someone follows. Once you lose trust or lose the respect of the persons you need to follow you, you are no longer effective as a leader.

    I find the examples and explanations sited on point.

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      chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

      I agree with you, after discussing each power base it was understood that all of them hold a certain perspective, and that all of them hold a certain consequence. Knowing what all of the powers perceives will make the influences that much beneficial for use.

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      michael-beck@lpso.net

      Your point of different situations call for different approaches is very true. In emergency situations, you sometimes need to just give an order and have people follow it through. After that situation is over, you can sit down with the team and explain the reason for demanding something be done and give them the logic behind you making your decision. I have found this shows you know you used your legitimate power, but are changing strategies to hopefully show that it came with expert power. Usually people see your side, understand from where you made the decision, and will respect it.

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        mtroscla@tulane.edu

        This is a very good point, calm and nice is fine, but when you're in a rapidly deteriorating situation, employees need to follow orders rapidly and without questions.

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      guttuso_fa@jpso.com

      I definitely think the coercion and legitimate power should be used sparingly. But could see where it may have to be used for some situations. Such as a deputy/officer who is just not responding to any other technique.

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        mmoscona@floodauthority.org

        Our legitimate power is automatic based on our appointments as supervisors. I think the use of the other power bases especially Expert and Referent powers should be used to enhance our legitimate power.

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    chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

    The learning in Module #5 was a lot of information about the bases of power. I've learned that Leadership and Power is truly effective when it comes to influences. Knowing the bases of power is reward, coercive, expert, referent and legitimate we have considerations when using the power.

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      anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

      I agree, we as leaders must successfully know how to influence our followers, to get the best from them.

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    michael-beck@lpso.net

    The lesson I really learned from this module was that we, as leaders, really need to make people want to follow us rather than listening to us due to our rank or position in our organizations. I thought back about times when I have used pretty much all of them and some of the negative consequences, as stated by Brid. Gen. Banks were the deputies only did what I told them to do and nothing more. I do not want mindless automatons working with me; I want a team that thinks on their own and will move our organization into the future. I have tried not to repeat this mistake, but as power is situational and transitory, the things which worked then may not work now and I will need to be mindful to change my approach in every situation. As Simon Sinek said, “[I] want people to believe what I believe,” and “they don’t follow because they have to, but because they want to.”

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      McKinney

      Even though we possess different “powers,” I agree with your point that we need to make people want to follow us rather than listening to us due to our rank and or position. Being a real leader will be more authentic for influencing others rather than a formal and or authoritative “power.”

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    mtroscla@tulane.edu

    Understanding how employees respond to differing power basis and the reasons why can be beneficial to a leader that is trying to operate efficiently. Employees may react more readily to leaders that only demonstrate power for altruistic reasons rather that those who only flex their power to effect control.

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    As leaders, we have a lot of power. We have to use our power in different ways depending on what we are dealing with. As we learn how we need to use this power to achieve the desired result, makes choosing the base more desirable.

    Lead with the power, that you wish to be lead by. The power to lead like a shepherd will result in less turnover and higher morale for the agency. Just because we have the power, we do not always have to use it.

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      cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

      I like how you said "Lead with the power that you wish to be lead by". Just like the golden rule, "treat others as you wish to be treated". Good stuff.

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      Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

      I agree that we all have been given "legitimate" power and with it come a certain amount of Coercion/Reward power. I believe we all strive to reach into the next 2 bases and gain referent and expert power. I do attempt with every shift to lead with more of the combination of legitimate and expert which in turn will develop a certain aspect of referent power to compliment it. I have always tried to lead as I wish to be led as you stated.

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    guttuso_fa@jpso.com

    After watching this module it made me realize how many of my former supervisors relied on the legitimate/coercion power to supervise. This was in the late 80's early 90's. I think many of our current supervisors do not rely solely on those types of power. Not to say they never use them. I believe in order to be a true and effective leader you will need to use most of these in combination depending on the situation.

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      steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

      Reverent and Expert would be the best to have, but a group will not all look at a leader in the same way. We as leaders will have to use what is necessary at the moment and work to have the reverent power from as many as possible for the long term.

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      Your comment about older leaders using coercion power to supervise, seemed to be the one stop shop for supervision at one time. I have worked under a few supervisors within the past 10 years that still ruled with the iron fist mentality and you will do what I say because I'm in charge and production reflected their leadership. When leaders utilize their legitimate power in collaboration with expert power, I have seen the production of the unit sky rocket.

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    cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

    Regulating someone else's behavior is not an easy task to do. As leaders we manage multiple people who all have different personalities and different behaviors. It is important for leaders to learn all the ways to regulate behaviors taught in this module.

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    Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

    This discussion on Power Bases made me reflect back on leaders that have come before and after me, I had assigned each of them their strongest one or two power bases. In that reflection, I have these leaders divided into 2 different categories, some I have looked up to for leadership strategies and others I have looked at for pointers of what path I didn't want to take. This lesson brought a new reasoning to that division with the information presented that when you lead based solely off of legitimate, reward, or coercive bases you can only develop short term compliance. I respected them for the rank, but never reached that internalization stage with those leaders.

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      clouatre_kj@jpso.com

      I agree with your response. I've had all types of supervisors/commanders. I have observed the tyrant types and said to myself, I would never behave or lead that way. I've observed all types or supervisors in my career, which hopefully molded me into a more well rounded commander. Sometimes, seeing the ugly side only helps you appreciate the good ones and help mold you into a better supervisor.

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    ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

    This module is very informative with the definitions of power. It is easy to see all the types reflected in nearly every department. This will definitely help in the future when you think about these aspects before and during dealings with subordinates.

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    anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

    This lecture helped me realize the different bases of power in leadership, and also help me to understand that understanding the different powerbases, is vital so i can better lead my followers.

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    steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

    I learned much from the different principles to leadership from being consistent with principle 2. I think being a consistent supervisor is very important with team know what to expect. The team should be able to predict with accuracy as how you would want something handled. If we are inconsistent, than the team will always be looking to you for direction.
    I see many private organizations not using principle 5 with concern for their employees. Most have the attitude, "it is not about what you did for me yesterday, its about what you are doing today." This creates a culture of disloyalty within the organization and will cause team member to look elsewhere for security and stability.

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    Throughout our careers, we have all work for a leader that left an impact on us. Some of those impacts were positive, and some were negative. This module helped define the different types of powers that those supervisors possessed over us and how each of the powers influenced production. After this address, I feel that it will be easier for me to identify the behaviors and which powers to utilize to affect a positive outcome.

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      dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

      You are right Dean, even today I look back on how certain supervisors handled things and say to myself, I definitely want to handle it differently. While other supervisors have the traits that you want to follow in all decision making.

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    This module provided a well thought out breakdown to the power that we assert on a daily basis. Understanding how and why others respond to power is important in our daily interactions. It also shows how we can regulate ourselves, in our contacts and profession. We all have known that time, maybe working the street that something worked and our response is surprise that it did. If we try the same thing again, we might fall flat on our faces. With our coworkers, we have developed relationships that assist us in the exercise of the power bases.

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      blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree I think that knowing the five bases of power and how to use them will effectively help us in our leadership skills as supervisors. Many times, something worked one way but did not work the same way the second time.

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    blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

    I am the canine trainer for our department; It is interesting that the power bases also work similarly to the canine world. I was able to better understand the five bases of power by reflecting on what I do in the canine world and how it can be applied to supervise my officers. As the saying goes, "It is easier to work with animals than people," but with the right tools and knowledge, it helps us as supervisors to be effective.

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    dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

    This is one of the times that I think back to when we receive a new detective. We assign this person to go through the call rotation with each detective and I tell them each detective has some tool that you can take and put in your toolbox. Some tools that you come across, you want to store in the drawer marked, don't use these tools. The same goes for supervisors that I have worked for throughout the years. Some have tools that you want to use, others not so much. It is up to you to make the most of the tools provided to you.

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    dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

    When Dr. Long puts it in perspective of the 5 bases of power, my first thought is the perception of others when one of their peers is promoted. For me, I have felt like I have remained the same person, not forgetting where I came from, which was a beat cop. But a few factors come to mind when I think about what bases of power I have absorbed as I’ve been promoted and the positions I have held. I remember what it was like when one of my brothers or sisters was promoted, and the perception of their peers that existed. Whether it was jealousy if the opinion was terrible, to begin with, or happiness if they felt a genuine sense of compassion for that peer, as that peer, including myself, began to exert that power, regardless of which power, it is always important to remember to remain consistent in the approach to managing how that power was used.

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    cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

    I like how Dr. Long discussed the 5 power bases and how they are situational, relational and transitional; I particularly enjoyed how he illustrated how the 3 reactions to power are linked to each of the power bases.

    Again, if we are inspiring people rather than using brute force, we can have better outcomes in performance and retention. When people believe what you believe, they internalize the goal and pursue it for themselves.

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    clouatre_kj@jpso.com

    This module brought me through my twenty-four years in law enforcement. I literally have been watching the 5 bases of power transition during my career. Most supervisors I observed in my early years were mostly former military guys, drill sergeant types working off fear and demands. Over time, I have watched the exit of those types, to what is the new supervisor/commander, working through the other bases. I do believe that all bases of power are needed, the difficult part is knowing how and when to utilize each at the right time. Each employee, circumstance, and their differences should dictate how and when to use each.

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    When using the five bases of power, I have to remember that I only have as much influence as others think I have, regardless of my position in the organization. In other to influence someone, I have to know which power to use that will be effective. Every situation and person is different.

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    This module sets the tone for having the ability to make one self-reflect about your style of leadership. There are always situations that we can reevaluate after they happen. It makes us realize what king of leadership we implement to have followers or inspired people. Ultimately, when placed in position of "power", it is understood that becoming a role model who is a leader is more capable of inspiration as opposed to imposing will. People will respond to the way you treat them upfront.

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    dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

    After reviewing this module and the different power bases one thing began to come to light. It seems that the majority of the time when someone is first promoted the first powers they subscribe to is the coercion and legitimate. It takes time,if every, for the the other power to present themselves to the new supervisor. New supervisors a lot of times feel as if this is the correct course of action, they are now a supervisor and everyone has to do what i say. It is not until they understand the remaining powers that they transform from a supervisor into a leader.

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      dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

      Danny, I agree with you. So many times do we see young people who are promoted and their only way of dealing with questions is to answer, "Because I said to do it." That, in my opinion, is the epitome of a supervisor and not a leader.

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        Adam Gonzalez

        Your post is short but strong. I to have witnessed this in my career at different times. Each situation is its own but each have that thread of commonality. Now that we are in the positions that we are in, it is especially incumbent upon us to lead differently. It is up to us to show why others want to follow us because we are working for the greater good, both individually and collectively as an agency!

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        I first encountered this as a newly minted Second Lt. In the reserves. I was prior enlisted so I understood the importance of Sergeants and I had already worked for some poor leaders. When I went into ROTC, I was taught about legitimate power, the power to reward and the power to punish. I think most newly promoted law enforcement supervisors understand these basic concepts as well. But as a new leader, you have not yet built the Expert power (knowledge) Referent power (power bestowed by others). Sadly without experience, feedback and mentor ship, many supervisors never learn to use Expert and Referent power and are the “because I said so” leaders referenced above.

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    dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

    I believe informal regulation is much more beneficial than formal regulation. In my opinion, when you have informal regulation, it means that you are acting in a manner that others see as model performance. There are many supervisors that I know who only have formal regulation, given to them by their rank.

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    Lt. Mark Lyons

    The instructors in this training module did a really good job describing the relationship between leadership, power and behavior. I'm sure we have seen our fair share of supervisors who were poor leaders. The ones who don't know how to handle the authority and trust that they have been given by their employers/ agencies. I believe the information provided in this training module can be used to help our agency identify certain qualities or traits our future leaders may possess.

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      wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

      I agree over my years of law enforcement I have seen some supervisors who were poor leaders. The ones who allows authority to go to their heads, information given will definitely help my organization with upcoming leaders and supervisors.

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        Deputy Mitchell Gahler

        I also agree that power can sometimes lead to poor leadership. The individuals who want a promotion for control, power, and job title can negatively affect an organization. Power should be utilized to positively guide, coach, and direct others in a positive direction to generate positive behaviors.

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    Adam Gonzalez

    "People don't buy what you do, they buy why you do it" - Simon Sinek. Is there a greater profession in the world, where a group of disciplined servants are paid to help out their fellow men? With this in mind, do we not have nearly every tool at our disposal to recruit and retain those like-minded individuals who also desire to serve the public? Each of us entered this profession because of the noble service we render and even for some, the good examples demonstrated by those we looked up to. In this day of cynicism and sarcasm, disrespect and low-brow humor aimed at police, I believe that we do in fact have nearly every great tool at our disposal to both recruit and retain those like-minded individuals that also desire to serve their fellow men. And, I believe their are many out there waiting to jump on to this form of public service because they buy into why it is right to do it!

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    mmoscona@floodauthority.org

    We should strive to use all of the power bases in order to create a balanced work environment for our employees. Everyone knows that we as supervisors have legitimate power and authority based on our appointment as supervisors. Coercive power should only be used when necessary and should be fair and consistent. If we as supervisors display expert and referent power at all times then our people will trust us and that will enhance our legitimate power.

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    wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

    I learned from this module as a leader, you must be apprised of the plan, purpose and structure of your organization. Know your employees and communicate with them. Make sure that all employees are given the same guidelines and opportunities.

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    Again we see such simple defining of our behaviors that causes you to reflect upon how you acted in situations as a supervisor or how you were treated as a subordinate. Our profession seems to be filled with a particular power set of either coercive or reward. How far have we come and how far can we go now that we recognize these? One would have to be a fool to not apply the 5 principles used to regulate behavior and begin immediately reshaping their department or at the very least, their divisions.

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    Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

    I felt this module was interesting and made some really good points. we have all worked for good and bad leaders. If we self- reflect we may discover and admit to ourselves if we are a good or bad leader. This module gives us tools to improve ourselves as leaders.

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    Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

    Leadership and power
    One thing that I acquired from this module is “what works in one circumstance may not work in another.” As a supervisor I realize firsthand that knowing you are the supervisor does not give you power. It is the way you treat your subordinates and lead them, is what gives you the power to supervise and manifest into a stronger leader.

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    Lt. Marlon J Shuff

    In this module, Dr. Long discussed the considerations for using power- situational, relational, and transitory. Reminds me of the quote by Abraham Maslow, "When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail." When leaders have limited tools (hammer), they are likely to use it to fix everything. This approach doesn't apply to leadership power. There isn't a "one size fits all." Instead, our approach should be specific to each person and situation.

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    Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

    This module was interesting with the explanation of the different bases of power by Dr. Larry Long. Most people experience the different types of power within their career span and never really understand the specific principles for using the power. To truly become an effective leader one must learn how to use combinations of each power base. Leaders that can utilize those combinations can achieve more heightened and positive responses.

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      Jessica,
      I definitely agree that a balance of power is going to be the most effective means of leading. You are going to have different personalities and employees are going to perceive ones power according to the 5 bases and principles. So you definitely have to have combination of all 5 and recognize which one is going to be appropriate in each situation.

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      Sergeant James Schueller

      I agree, looking back I have worked with or for supervisors who exhibit all of the power bases- some heavy on the Coercion and others using combinations of all. Whether or not they understood (or in some cases, cared...) isn't always known to us. But you are correct in that to be a truly effective leader we must all learn to use combinations of the bases in order to be effective. The ones that rely heavily on Coercion and Legitimate are not the type of leaders that can have a lasting, positive effect- and one that shouldn't be the legacy left behind.

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        Christopher Lowrie

        I agree James. I too have worked under several different supervisors who utilize different power bases. The best leaders and supervisors keep it balanced and don't rely too heavily on one power base.

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      Utilizing a combination of power bases is extremely beneficial to be an effective leader. I think we also need to remember that our expert power may become more significant the longer we serve in a specific role, in addition to staff changing (i.e. retirements, resignations, personnel actions), therefore our referent power may become more natural. However, particularly in this career, there may be times when legitimate power should be exercised. I couldn’t agree more that we need to learn the effectiveness of when to use a combination of bases.

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      Ryan Manguson

      I agree with you comments. Leaders will encounter time when all different power types will need to be used. Understanding the power bases and how to best apply them to each situation leads to successful leadership.

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      Gregory Hutchins

      The basic principle to use when adopting a leadership style must be made by understanding one's power to influence another is relational, and a leader only has the amount of power given by others. Influencing others can be an art in itself, and to an extent, these principles are lost on some of the younger generations as experienced in the way they tend to fail at conflict resolution. Whether it is as a young supervisor addressing a discipline issue or during interactions with the public, there seems to be a general struggle by many to exert power when required.

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    when applying your power and authority it is important that you understand that using power and how people respond to your power and authority is going to be based on many factors. How people respond to your power is going to be based on their understanding of the power and how they perceive that you are applying it. In this module the 5 bases of power were discussed. I feel that as a supervisor you need to understand the principles behind each of the 5 and be able to apply them as you identify situation and individuals. People are different and respond differently to supervisors and their use of power. If as a supervisor you can identify what type of power to use in each situation I believe you can be an effective leader.

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      Lt. Joseph Flavin

      I agree that it's important to be able to identify what type of power to use in each situation. Using the wrong power base in a situation may lead to an unwanted outcome. Understanding your people and how they respond to you is important in identifying the correct type of power to use in a given situation.

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      Eduardo Palomares

      Very good point Mr. Jahner. This is when self awareness and emotional intelligence comes into play. As leaders we have to understand that when applying certain bases of power, people will respond on many factors. The reaction could be positive or it could be negative. I have to admit that there were situations I had no clue of the bases of power I was applying. It cost me some headaches because I used the wrong approach for the situation. Lesson learned. It has been a learning process for me identifying and using the most appropriate base of power for the situation. You are absolutely right. Once I was able to identify the type of power and use it appropriately I became a more effective leader. I gained more influence and my job became easier.

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    Deputy Mitchell Gahler

    This module discussed the five bases of power: reward, coercive, expert, referent, and legitimate. It was helpful how the module identified each bases and the influence they have if utilized. Leaders have an extremely high amount of power, but misuse could cause individuals to be less receptive and distrust. Power does not guarantee influence. It's how you guide others with the power of a leader that causes effectiveness.

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      Sergeant Durand Ackman

      So true, just because we have power over people doesn't mean they will trust us nor follow us. I have seen far too many examples of people basically following out of fear.

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    Lt. Joseph Flavin

    Power is influence. Understanding that there are 5 bases of power will help leaders seek to attain the ones that will breed long term commitment; Expert and Referent. While Reward and Coercive work short term, they don't provide those being influenced with anything long term or sustaining. It's important to understand the power you currently have, and the power you wish to have. Power bases are transitory in that what might work today may not work tomorrow.

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    Sergeant James Schueller

    The 6 Power Bases were clearly defined, and all 6 have their place given time and circumstance. We are somewhat limited in the Reward base in public safety compared to private sector, but too often supervisors forget that the ability to give isn't limited to monetary rewards. Similarly, Coercion is sometimes necessary to get or correct behaviors seen, especially with a difficult employee when other reasoning doesn't work and "all else has failed". Legitimate is easy to see in public safety due to the para-military structure we operate under. It is interesting to see that the keys to commitment were noted as Expert and Referent, as I think a true leader also needs to have Informational in order to lead into the future. Although seen in earlier modules, it was a nice tie in here for Sinek's "People don't buy what you do they buy why you do it" Golden Circle analogy.

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      Sergeant Paul Gronholz

      I agree James. And we can apply the why to law enforcement as well. Not just in leading our organization but in leading the community. We need to be able to articulate the why more effectively. Now more than ever people demand to know why we do things. We should look at it as an opportunity to educate and inspire the community to support us in what we believe is important.

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    I sincerely enjoyed listening to Brigadier General Bernard Banks, particularly his point on garnering the key to commitment in leadership. Obtaining expert and referent power is no easy task, but I completely agree these two are the most effective to lead as efficiently as possible over a long period of time. Dr. Larry Long’s presentation, of course, touched in more detail of the bases of power, their characteristics and reactions to those bases. With power bases being situational, relational and transitory, there are certainly going to be times when leaders may have to tap into each power base to get a task completed. And going back to Simon Sinek’s “golden circle”, leaders need to be clear on their “why” they choose to lead how they lead so that others may readily follow, even when there may be times when the legitimate power base is called into action in order to achieve a mission, or save lives.

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    Jarvis Mayfield

    I believe in some cases if you are popular or able to share information you will receive a certain type of privilege. Having Informational Power and being apart of a click will always give you one leg up on an employee who works hard but does not possess and of the 6 Power Bases.

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    Leadership comes down to using interpersonal influence to regulate the behavior of others. Influence can be formal or informal power. As Dr. Long indicated, power by by itself does not guarantee influence. A leader must understand the 5 power bases (Reward, Coercive, Expert, Referent and legitimate) to maximize the power needed to impact a person or situation. Each power base has its good points and each could have some negative consequences if used inappropriately. As I listened to Dr. Long talk about the considerations for using power I was reminded of the hammer analogy. A hammer is good for pounding in nails but it is useless if you need to cut a piece of wood. A leader may have to use coercive power to deal with an employee based on the situation. Just because it worked this time, that does not mean the leader can use it to address all employees. The other part of this module I found interesting was the connection between compliance, Identification and internalization and short, long and longer term strategies. I think many leaders fall into the trap of focusing on short term issues so they resort to their reward or coercive power bases because they get quick results. Towards the end of the presentation, Dr. Long discussed 5 difference principles. Of these, I feel that Principle #1 (precisely define the behavior to be regulated) is critical. If you do not know the behavior you are trying to address, you may inappropriately use another base of power and create negative consequences.

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    Kyle Phillips

    I had not thought about power in the form of different applications before. It would appear to me that being able to influence and empower your subordinates and peers would require you to have Referent and Expert power over/from them. Successfully being able to identify the type of power needed to achieve the desired results and the situation to deploy the type of power are only obtainable if you have the trust of those you are affecting with your power.

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      Maja Donohue

      Very good point. Understanding your bases of power and knowing when to use them is absolutely essential in building trust with subordinates. As Dr. Long said, power is relational and only works if others perceive that you possess it and that you will use it to fulfill their needs. It is also worth noting that trust makes it possible to maintain power even when we make an honest mistake in how we apply our bases of power.

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    Eduardo Palomares

    As I progress in this course, I have been reflecting on past experiences and the different bases of power I have used as a leader. The different bases of power covered in this lecture were very educational. As a newcomer supervisor, I only used referent power but experienced resistance and push back. I felt disappointed because I was expecting my team to trust me and model my behavior. I had to fight the institutional dislike from the officers who now considered me of being part of the "management" team. Staying consistent with this base of power allowed me to break thru the barriers established by some of my subordinates. Unfortunately, some of them had bad experiences which led to distrust.

    As I advanced in my leadership position, I quickly realized that I had to maintain a healthy balance and wisely use the bases of power for each situation. As I did this, things became easier and I gained more influence over my people. I was unable to motivate and inspire those that initially resisted. I knew that empowering them rested in me using referent power coupled with expert and reward base power.

    After this lesson, I will strive to use the bases of power more wisely to achieve long lasting results. One of the power bases that could destroy trust is coercion. Effective leaders don't have to resort to this tactic to obtain influence. Unfortunately, we all have seen or worked for leaders that thrive on using legitimate and coercion power to accomplish tasks and gain compliance. Now that I have better understanding on the bases of power, I will fairly and wisely apply them according to the situation with legitimate and coercion being the last resort.

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      Sergeant Chad Blanchette

      Good points. I do agree with you on coercion. It may get immediate results, but the long term effects of utilizing this power will not be good.

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    Ryan Manguson

    This was an interesting module on leadership and power. It provided a nice breakdown and understanding of each of the 5 power bases. As leaders, there will be opportunities to utilize each of the power bases in differing situations. The key to a successful leader is understanding which power base will be the most effective to reach your desired outcome in a given situation.

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    Sergeant Chad Blanchette

    This module reaffirmed some of the learning points from some of the other modules. Leadership is the ability to influence others to be able to solicit a desired response from someone. Going through the bases of power was interesting. I think on a day to day basis, I utilize a combination of them.

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      Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

      I agree Chad, I like how these modules seem to flow into the next. Yes, it seems like a leader must keep these 5 bases in his/her tool bag to use at the appropriate time with the appropriate officer.

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    Maja Donohue

    Leadership is so much more than power. What resonated the most with me in this module is that we only have power if others perceive that we do. This statement alone should motivate us to learn and understand how to use the 5 bases of power (reward, coercive, expert, referent and legitimate). Power is one of many tools that a leader can use to influence others, but if it is abused or mishandled, it can also weaken our ability to regulate behavior. Successful leaders know which power base(s) to use when and know how to combine them to build credibility. It clearly goes to show that when we are entrusted with legitimate power, we also assume responsibility to use it wisely, because legitimate power alone will not get us far.

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      Cynthia Estrup

      I agree that there is power in being a leader, and often times it is very easy to abuse it. We have to be able to always remember where we came from and how we achieved the things we have within our careers. I actually think there is greater power when we build members of our team up and build strong, inclusive leaders within our field.

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      Andy Opperman

      I totally agree that leadership is so much more than power, and I would argue that good leaders do not even think of their ability to influence as power. Good leaders enjoy watching their people excel! While there is an added benefit of making the leader look good, for them it’s about motivating their people to reach their full potential.

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    Cynthia Estrup

    One of the comments Long made in his teachings was, "You can force a person to do their job, but it is really hard to force someone to like you.” A team will be much more productive when they feel like they are part of a group. This goes along with wanting to follow a leader, rather than being forced to do a task. There are times when managers get bogged down with all the tasks they need to complete they forget how to treat their people. This is a sure fire way to break the morale within the department and would be very difficult to recover from. I would even argue, this is a time when we need to continue to focus on the "why" and making sure our team always knows the why behind everything they do.

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      Robert Schei

      I agree, it is so much more enjoyable working for someone that you believe in and want to work with vs. working for someone who forces you to do it their way.

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    Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

    This module clearly defined the 5 bases of power and the potential reactions and outcomes to each. An item of note that this module made me consider is how different each officer can react to each base of power. These reactions will vary upon the level of experience, maturity, and knowledge base that the officer has. This is an example of why it is important that leaders take a vested interest in their officers to get to know what level they may be at on multiple planes. Also, I like how we opened up with herb Brooks, Minnesota native!!! Well done

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    Robert Schei

    It feels great working for leadership that we believe in and look up to. Those that are experts in their field with the heart of a teacher and are not afraid to mentor others always tend to be sought after. One challenge in public employment is the use of legitimate power whereas people are promoted but may not necessarily be experts in any area and are not looked up to by others. Long and unpleasant is there time in power where others seek to avoid them and look for ways around them. Disrespectful leadership tends to breed low moral and discontentment whereas Positive, honest and ethical leadership creates high moral and an improved work place culture.

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    Christopher Lowrie

    Any module that contains Coach Brooks' 1980 motivational speech is a winner in my book. Every time I listen to it I get goosebumps and feel like I could run through a brick wall. Leaders in an organization need to feel they earned their position and feel the need to empower others. A great leader uses the 5 bases of power in combination to help the team accomplish goals.

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    Sergeant Paul Gronholz

    I appreciated learning about the 5 bases of power and how each of them translates to leadership. I agree that expert and referent are the most powerful for lasting leadership and influence. I've understood that leadership is influence. It fascinates me why some in an organization are regarded as leaders, while others that may be as smart or smarter, struggle at leading others. Also, I learn something more every time I listen to Simon Sinek speak. "People don't buy what you do, they buy why you do it." Yet some leaders are so reluctant to share the why. Also, police officers need to be able to answer why when leading their organization and in leading the community. People now more than ever want to know the why, we must be able to communicate why effectively!

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    Sergeant Durand Ackman

    I have worked for different supervisors that use various methods to lead their people and can think of examples of each of the bases of power. I always find it interesting that some people rely so much on coercion and/or legitimate power. They use those so frequently that their people start to despise them. Yet there are others that rarely use coercion or legitimate power so when they need to use coercion or legitimate it puts the entire team on notice. I feel that is what works best, only using coercion and legitimate power when necessary. The other bases of power tend to build the best team and provide the best long term results.

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      Sergeant Matt Wieland

      I agree with your last 2 sentences. Using coercion and legitimate power may get a desired short term result, but does nothing for team building and long term relationship building with your staff.

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      I would agree that a lot of people really focus on coercion and/or legitimate power. I learned in this module that to be a good leader you have to be able to use all 5 bases of power and know the appropriate time to use each one. Each member on your team is going to be different in some way, and the team that I currently supervise are very different in personality, drive, and work ethic. Some are very tuned into me as a leader and want to be more like me, and others are just coming to work and going home without any lasting effects of the job on them when they aren't at work. As a leader, I need to be able to adapt and use the correct power bases depending on the situation and realize what worked yesterday, may not work tomorrow.

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    Samantha Reps

    This learning lesson had several great objectives. The six learning power bases reward, coercion, legitimate power, expert power, referent power, and informational power were all great tools for any organization. At times, I believe, we need to use them at throughout our careers but we need to know how to do it correctly.

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      Samantha,
      I totally agree timing is everything especially when dealing with numerous types of different personalities. As you said using them correctly is crucial otherwise damage can be done that may take along time to repair.

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    Understanding that there is no one size fits all form of leadership is so important to today's leader. I have people from all age groups on my team. Knowing the bases of power and applying them correctly to the situation or individual is paramount to success.

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    Sergeant Matt Wieland

    This module is important because it tells us that leadership and power is so much more than a rank structure and an order/response. I like Simon Sinek's idea that "those who lead inspire us". Leadership is all about interpersonal relationships, and taking the time to make sure people understand why they are being told to do something, and what importance it has. If you take the time to know and show that you care about those you supervise, they will be more likely to be influenced by you. I liked the statement "you only have as much influence as others think you have, regardless of your position in the organization". True leaders took the promotion to have a positive influence on those they supervise, not taking the promotion just to feel like they have power over someone.

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      Sergeant Kelly Lee

      Agreed Matt, the statement saying, "you only have as much influence as others think you have, regardless of your position in the organization". I have seen numerous times new hires come into our organization and show great respect to a certain level of command staff (as they should) only to hear them later on say what a poor leader so and so is. Leading is about inspiring and challenging being a leader is not just wearing brass on your uniform collar.

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      Timothy Sandlin

      Great points. Leadership is having the ability to foster a relationship to inspire, connect, and inspire others. A title can not create that. It can give you the opportunity to cultivate such a relationship.

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    Andy Opperman

    I think as leaders defining where our power comes from can really help to humble us. Leaders who are introspective will analyze their leadership style and realize that while they have power, that power is only as productive as the followers allow it to be. While coercive power is productive with results, I think it destroys the loyalty many followers have with their leaders. The work environment then becomes an "us" versus "them" mentality. Referent, expert and informational power really establishes the leader as being a "why," thinker as Sinek describes. Referent, expert and information power garners much more influence and makes the work environment an easy place to be. I liked hearing Sinek talk about the Law of Diffusion and Innovation. It makes you think about what our world could really be if the percentage of innovators rose.

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    Sergeant Kelly Lee

    After listening to Simon Sinek speak several times now, I am really buying into his philosophy on "The Golden Circle" and how we all need to be looking at things from the perspective. If we listen to the theory and understand that by communicating our differences we can set ourselves apart from others to inspire staff to act, making them become more engaged and getting "buy-in". Once we have that the agency's will see the positive changes from within. As Sinek states, successful people and organizations express why they do what they do rather than focusing on what they do. I think this is a strong point for many young people within an agency. Lots of times new/younger staff have questions and loose their way becoming frustrated because they fail to see the big picture.

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      Jacqueline Dahms

      I agree Kelly. I think a lot of what we say and do needs to inspire the people we work with and supervise. I really believe it starts at the top in providing that inspiration. Most higher ups can be exhausted and are just waiting their time. But I have plenty of people that need the focus of WHY which I know will motivate them to do more.

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        Yes! just about all government is horrible at selling people on the "why". The Declaration of Independence is a great "why". But each agency needs to engage more with the community they serve and communicating that "why" must be the priority.

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    Until this module, I didn't realize that there were 5 bases of power. I found it interesting that you don't only have to use one at a time and there isn't a specific situation that they have to be used in. It is up to your discretion to decide which one or ones seem fitting at any given time. I also like the point that the lesson pointed out that they are relational and are unique to each person. Each person that you are working with at the time may change, and that may mean that the power base at the time may need to be changed as well. It is important to remember that what works in one circumstance or situation might be different in another, and you have to adjust accordingly. That's what makes a good leader.

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    Jacqueline Dahms

    What I noticed regarding power is perception. Someone’s perception of you is 100% their reality. And since we do not always know what people think of us, we do our best with what we know. I think far too often leaders get away with using legitimate power and are just that, leaders with authority. Going back to the Golden Circle by Simek, the WHY drives behavior. It also inspires and builds loyalty. I liked the explanation of the reactions to power. Internalization is where we want our people to be, in line with our values and our beliefs.

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      I like how you say the why inspires and builds loyalty. If the messaging is done correctly, I would agree. I don't know if we're so good and identifying our why to our followers. I almost wish that would've been the topic for this essay, "describe your agencies why."

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    Major Willie Stewart

    The module talks about the bases of power which is defined as the influence that you have over your target when you target. The one that stood out to me was referent. Referent states it positively identifies with and wishes to be like you. When someone wants to be like you it means they believe in you and that you will help and lead them to believe in themselves. So your perception of someone else is truly their reality.

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    I've seen the Simon Sinek video numerous times and I learn from it a little more each time. Why do we do what we do? It's a good rule of thumb for us to have as leaders. We'll get more followers when we demonstrate or advertise why we do things in this business. The why for law enforcement for me is kind of easy, we all desire to live in communities that are safe and crime-free. It makes sense and might help us as leaders sell new ideas if we focus on our why.

    The other area I learned was when to use our power. Situationally, relationally, and transitorily. We have to be mindful of using our "power" because it can be destructive if used too much, at the wrong time, or disproportionally to the situation. People and situations are unique and we cannot approach problems with a one size fits all mentality.

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    Brad Strouf

    By defining "Power" and breaking it down to 5 basic bases made me reflect on how successful supervisor and leaders utilize a combination of bases to lead. By only utilizing the first one made me think of K9 training. A wonderful approach when conditioning an animal, but probably not a productive approach, when used alone, to modifying human behavior.

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    I can relate to the idea of how power is perceived will dictate relevancy. I had a supervisor who seemed harsh and unapproachable up front, but once you got to know him, it was quite the opposite. He really wanted the best for us, but the typical talk around the office by people who didn't take the time to know him, led to a bad perception of him as a leader.

    The five bases of power makes sense and was something I've seen before. I had not seen the explanation or correlation for the reactions to power.

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      Marshall Carmouche

      Nathan, I do my best not to let other's "perceptions" of someone influence me. I typically base my own opinion on someone once I get to know them But, I agree with how power is perceived specifically power of the upper command.

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    Sgt. Shawn Wilson

    When it comes to Leadership and Power and the 5 different bases I always come back to; our people are what drives our organizations in a positive direction. When we take care of our people and empower them to be great, we will see tangible positive results. There may be a time and place for each of the 5 different bases but in my experiences if I always remember to put my people first the "base" that will have the greatest positive impact has always been clear.

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    Nicole Oakes

    I find it very telling that so many public agencies fail to consider employees personal needs. They say that family is important and that they are supportive of personal needs and families, but usually it is at the last minute that personnel find out about schedule changes, or transfers. That is why turnover is high in most public service jobs, along with leadership not being referent but rather coercive in their power.

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      Ronald Smith

      Nicole here in my little city we fought for the ability to donate unused sick and vacation time to officers who needed it. The fight lasted over two years and we were able to donate vacation time only. It helped several people, During this covid period the rules changed and we can donate sick time to those who legitimately needed it.
      Part of protecting the referent power starts at home, in your example of schedule changes our profession can be cruel but we have to keep our families aware there are somethings outside our control. I get people getting upset because days off change and add a major strain to family life, but the benefits and a cooperative department do not mean always accommodating.

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      Matthew Menard

      I agree this very often happens and is why we as leaders need to take stock of our actions and the actions of those who lead us and change for the better. We now more than ever need good people in this profession who are here for a career and not as a short stop before a new job.

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    "People don't buy what you do, they buy why you do it". We all can respect someone who genuinely believes in a cause. That "why" is the passion. Ever notice how when you have to talk about something your passionate about, you don't need notes. That passion attracts people to our cause. Showing the relationships of power is great, but its something that we learn pretty quickly. For me, the lesson is to spend more time on my "why" when engaging with my deputies. Conversely, I need to get them to open up about their "why".

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    What really hit home with me was the statement that "people follow those who inspire those around them." By being a role model, and holding yourself personally to a higher standard is crucial. Coming from an informal leadership position and working my way into a formal leadership position. A person may not realize that others are following your lead. Remaining humble is essential.

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      Sergeant Michael Prachel

      This is very true. I have had experiences with being in an informal leadership role, where others may look to you for advice and knowledge. Looking back at those times, I believe remaining humble and modest helped me get through to those looking for advice or mentorship. I'm sure all of us had experiences with the arrogant individuals who chose not to be role models. Though they may have knowledge and expertise, leadership lacks.

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      Thomas Martin

      I agree with your statement in its entirety Troy. Leaders inspiring those around them deserve to be followed. The actions of supervisors will be observed and emulated by those he/she leads. Remain humble as you enter into your new formal leadership position. It will surely be seen as a feather in your cap by the administrators who bestowed you with the authority.

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    Timothy Sandlin

    In this module it reviewed the relationship between leadership and power or authority. Just because someone is placed into a position or designated a title doesn't magically make them a leader. This module covered the 6 power bases that influence a subordinate to comply or follow through with what the leader has directed. In my career I have experienced each one of the six at some point. The best leaders that I can remember demonstrated a healthy balance of many of the six. I found the video of Simon Sinek again on the "Golden Circle" as well as sharing the real world and historical references helpful in gaining a better understanding of the concept.

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    Gregory Hutchins

    The fifth element was a telling indictment on some of the profession's struggles through the five principles to follow. In previous lessons, the generational differences illustrated items such as what each generation holds essential, ways to communicate better or create engagement, and why some generations tend to jump ship earlier. Taking some of the themes, one can see how a failure to maintain constructive personal behavior levels can increase employee dissatisfaction.

    The result is the employees will seek employment elsewhere. From this, we incur the creation of another vacancy and the additional strain on the recruiting and training divisions to attempt to fill the shortages in a resource-depleted environment continually. Leaders must continually balance the organization's needs with that of the employees and sometimes make concessions to support the employee's basic needs.

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    Ronald Smith

    Being prepared to promoted takes time and effort, but if you do not invest in building relationships with the people you will soon be given legitimate power over you will find the power you wield is coercion. You may realize you can't beat people down all the time and revert to an occasional reward. Those of us already in leadership positions have to influence the up-and-coming leaders to understand the way all the powers work together. We need to help them become experts in their realm of knowledge to give them a great starting position as a leader. We all see the individuals who have referent power from their peers good or bad people will follow them.

    I look at the reactions to power in the world of law enforcement; compliance the short-term power is what we desire at the moment on the call for service. Identification, long-term power, or referent power the perception from city hall and the fiscal employer of the department. Internalization, the citizens grant us this power when they perceive us to act according to the oath and within the core values of policing.

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    Sergeant Michael Prachel

    “Leaders have the position of power and authority, but those who lead inspire us.” This statement drives home the fact that just because someone is in a supervisory position, does not mean they are going to inspire their employees to become better themselves. I have been fortunate enough to have those in supervisory positions to be great leaders in my career. However, I have had great co-workers who inspire and lead that are not in those upper-management positions. Those individuals have power to influence because they are willing to mentor and pass on their expert knowledge. Attitude is everything in my opinion when it comes to power – being humble and modest, not taking all of the credit, goes along way with their peers and builds trust.

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    Matthew Menard

    I found it interesting to review the different bases of power and think of specific people and instances where I have seen them used, even before knowing what they actually were. For each of these examples it was clear that some definitely work better than others. It also important to keep in mind how each bases of power is situational and the person using that power must be cognizant of it's use. We as leaders must strive to build upon our skill sets to employee these power bases when appropriate to achieve our goals while balancing those we lead and how they will react.

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    Marshall Carmouche

    Power is not something to be taken lightly. Power in not something to abuse. Power is something that should not go to someone's head. I firmly believe that true leaders have the ability to control their power. I have never been the type of supervisor to abuse the power that I have earned. Do notice that I chose "earned" I feel that power is earned, NOT GIVEN! Power may be stripped from a person at any given moment and without notice. A true leader should know that power, although necessary, can be detrimental if abused. I have witnessed power absolutely destroy someone's reputation and integrity. Leadership coupled with power are needed, but should never be abused.

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    Travis Linskens

    Learning more about the 5 bases of power has allowed me to evaluate which power bases I use most commonly. It also allowed me to reflect on what other leaders around me use to influence people. It's interesting how these methods evolve with the change of leadership. Under the previous administration, coercive power was commonly used to influence behavior. It was effective at achieving a short-sighted goal, but it also negatively impacted the relationship between supervisors and the staff. We now more commonly use the other bases to influence people and achieve our intended goals. I believe morale is overall more positive because of it the changes we've made.

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    Paul Brignac III

    I was glad to hear the comment made during this lesson that the five bases of power are relational, and can change with the person. As an instructor, I have learned that instruction, or leadership, may need to be modified based on individuals, and individual personalities. One of the previous lessons focused on differences among different generations. This is a prime example of needing to make changes in leadership styles based on the person. A leader must have a firm grasp on the five bases of power, then be flexible enough to incorporate them efficiently based on the target group or individual.

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    Thomas Martin

    I appreciated Doctor Long's Principle #4. Don't overregulate behavior. I have worked for several supervisors previously that were highly critical of their subordinate’s behavior. They seemed to be concerned with employee behavior more than the actual work being done. One individual would scour social media posts to see what her subordinates were doing off duty in an attempt to issue a “conduct unbecoming” disciplinary write up for policy violation. This was a sad attempt of the flexing of power, which ultimately led to a mutiny on her shift and her being transferred to another division.