Command and Staff Program

Effective Communication

Replies
313
Voices
160
Dr. Mitch Javidi
Instructions:  
  1. Post a new discussion related to the topics covered in this module.  Your post needs to provide specific lessons learned with examples from this module helping you enhance your leadership capacity at work.
  2. After posting your discussion, review posts provided by other students in the class and reply to at least one of them. 
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    Nancy Franklin

    Effective communication is crucial in all aspects of our lives, both professionally and personally. To be an effective leader, one has to constantly work at mastering the skill of effective communication. Communication is a dynamic process, and one which is ever-changing depending upon the circumstances and environment. Our ability to communicate effectively with one individual does not mean this same method of communication will apply to all individuals. Everyone brings their own life experiences, expectations, beliefs, and values into their communication styles. It is important for leaders to LISTEN and learn how to best communicate with each person on their teams or in their sphere of influence. Leaders must be genuine and instill a sense of confidence, trust and safety among their followers. To be an effective leader and communicator, others must trust and feel confident that the person they choose to follow has the expertise and knowledge to take them and the organization in the right direction. This is how leaders develop credibility, which is the foundation of effective communication and leadership.

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      Brian Lewis

      I agree that listening is key to being a good communicator. Like most, I have an open door policy, and when I'm visited, I make sure to ignore my monitors, my phone stays in my pocket, and I never look at my watch. Nothing can kill lines of communication faster than giving the impression you're not interested in what they are saying.

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      Colby Stewart

      I agree with you Nancy, effective communication is crucial in all aspects of our lives personal and professionally.

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      Frank Acuna

      Nancy,

      I agree that effective communication is critical, not only in our profession but as a leader. I think we all to often get wrapped up in our responses and forget to listen to what people are saying. This impacts our ability to effectively communicate because we have not listened to what the other person is saying. I am guilty of this and it is something I actively work to improve.

      Frank

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      Lt. Mark Lyons

      I completely agree. Effective communication is more than just a verbal exchange of words. Effective communication involves effective listening and the ability to relate to the situation and respond appropriately. It involves using proper word selection, voice tone and body language that reflects the seriousness of the conversation.

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      Kyle Phillips

      Nancy, I agree that not only is effective communication ket to our professional lives, but our personal lives. You are spot on when you say that different styles of communication are needed for different people, and that they don't all work interchangeably. I would add that being approachable would allow us to become better communicators and leaders.

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    Brian Lewis

    Effective communication has been my Achilles' heal my entire career. I've been told on a few occasions that I needed to work on my delivery when talking to subordinates. Early on when I was a sergeant, I mimicked the way I communicated with others based on my favorite leaders. Ones who didn't sugar coat anything, were brief, and blunt. I personally liked this style of communication because I viewed the person talking to me as an expert, they were dynamic, maybe not in words, but more in action. And they had earned my trust. These were military and SWAT leaders, where a little less conversation was usually preferred. Well, as I've promoted, I have noticed when I talk to large groups, they seemed turned off and that I'm not connecting with them. This was because I wasn't that open and I can definitely be stubborn. Over the past four years, I've really worked on my communication skills. I paid closer attention to my audience and crafted my messages in a way that they were more receptive to.

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      Chris Corbin

      Effective communication has also been a challenge for me and is one that I have committed to improving on. In seeking feedback on how I can improve in this area, I have found that I also tend to be too brief, which limits the connection created during the conversation and many times results in an incomplete communication. As a result, the involved parties leave with different interpretations of the plan, expectations or take-aways, which ultimately results in a disappointing or ineffective outcome. To combat this shortcoming, I now ask others, after asking if they have any questions, to re-state our goals, our plan, and our expectations to ensure that we share a truly singular understanding. I have found that by taking this approach, tasks are now completed with far fewer 'bumps in the road' and a higher level of satisfaction on everyone's part.

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        Brian Johnson

        We have all been in your position. For me, it's trying to be present and not allowing the subconscious mind that keeps trying to remind you of all the things that need to get accomplished today, which makes you come across as aloof or uncaring. Self-reflection is critical so you can develop the muscle memory that will help you catch yourself when communicating one-on-one or in a group.

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      Nancy Franklin

      Having the self-awareness about how your communication style is perceived by others is the key to being able to develop a more effective way to connect with others. It takes a lot of self-reflection and emotional intelligence to consider others needs / styles in the important communication process.

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        Steve Mahoney

        I agree with you on the self reflection. When going through this module I chuckled at myself as I am the "No, But, However" guy. I need to learn how to listen better instead of thinking about my response while the person is talking

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      Jarod Primicerio

      I have seen the same response in the past when I was also a sergeant. Possibly due to a lack of maturity, I do feel that over the past several years, I have finally realized how important it is to slow down, listen to the staff, and then make collaborative decisions.

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      Monte Potier

      I agree this is probably one of the toughest things for a law enforcement officer. Since we are always the one that needs to be in charge of situations, we sometimes fail to listen as part of effective communication under less stressful conditions.

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      Joey Prevost

      I also tried to emulate others that I looked up to in my delivery as it seemed effective for them. I realized that not everyone is the same and while some of my subordinates received the message in a positive way, there was one who i later learned was absolutely terrified of me. This was not my intent at all and caused me to re-evaluate how I communicate.

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        ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

        It is definitely tough when dealing with multiple people and multiple personalities. Even when you know everyone on an individual level it is very easy to be misinterpreted.

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      Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

      I agree with you Brian. I have learned over the years you cant talk to everyone in the same way. i have found you need different communication styles when dealing with different people. people of different age, gender, and culture respond differently.

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      Justin Payer

      Brian,
      I also prefeed my leaders to be brief and direct with me, and never wanted something sugar coated. I just wanted the facts. I have also used that style when talking to subordinates and later found out they thought I was angry because of the way I spoke. It has been challenging making sure that I deliver my message the right way. Good luck.

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      Brent Olson

      Brian,

      I think we have all been in the same place at one point or another. I also learned various leadership skills and styles from previous leaders that I looked up to or respected. Many of the skills I took from them were also the more "blunt" communication style. The communication was direct, to the point, and then you moved forward. I have learned while that style of communication may have a place at times, it is definitely not one that can be used for a majority of your communications with the newer generation of officers.

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    Chris Corbin

    Leadership is built on influence; influence is dependent on credibility; credibility is highly dependent on trust; trust must be earned through actions and relationships; and the right actions and strong relationships are built on a foundation of effective communication. In my opinion, effective communication starts with effective listening. Habit #5 in Steven Covey's "The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People", is "Seek first to understand, then to be understood". He argues that we share a general tendency to rush into other people’s issues to try and fix them by providing advice, and often do so with taking the time needed “to diagnose, and to really, deeply understand the problem first.” By investing time into truly understanding an issue or problem, we strengthen our relationships with those involved, which in turn allows us to gain the credibility and influence needed to become an effective leader.

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      Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

      Chris that was well stated. Listening is one of the greatest tools that was given to us and is sometimes ignored. Fixing problems and not allowing someone to communicate their needs first won't develop them. Allowing them to navigate through their own thought process while talking with you, the leader, builds trust and shows their vulnerability.

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    Kyle Turner

    This section's reminder that effective communication is essential to leadership is important for everyone in an organization, not just those in leadership. Often leaders/managers/supervisors tend to carry the burden of public communication resulting in future leaders/supervisors/managers who have little experience. Mentoring in this regard is essential to the success of future generations and providing feedback of one's strengths and weaknesses is important so people can improve over time. Also, communication can be strained between generations within an organization based on preferred style. With the newer generation of officers, it seems that more detailed communication is important to their understanding and development. Providing the "why" behind the directive or assignment is important in comparison to previous generations where people followed orders without explanations being given.

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    Jarod Primicerio

    Communication skills are definitely not equal to all by any means. I have struggled in the past with my listening skills when working as a sergeant. It was evident after receiving feedback from peers that things needed to change. I was able to take a few courses in active listening and integrate myself as an instructor into a conflict resolution course. Since then, I have truly experienced a different relationship both professionally and personally. Communication is definitely key to success.

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      Drauzin Kinler

      Jared, we all have the same struggles with effective communications. If you have been in law enforcement for any period of time this was just the mentality that everyone had. Most of the supervisors I had over the years had little to no communication skills. We learned from our supervisors and took on their traits. We now have to change our ways by educating ourselves so that the future leaders of our organizations don't have the same struggles that we face.

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      wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

      I have also struggled in the past with my listening skills when i was a lieutenant. My superiors advised i needed to step back and let my sergeant/subordinates be more active. Since then with more input, communication from my sergeant/subordinates i seen growth.

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    Brian Johnson

    We have all learned that effective communication comes down to being an active listener. It isn't an easy skill to master. As leaders, we realize that our influence shows in a various ways, especially our ability to listen so others feel like they have been heard. I need to improve in this area and I started by not bringing my cell phone to meetings, which demonstrates that you believe everyone's time is valuable. Reading text messages or emails during meeting is a sign that you do not value other people's time. Give it a try! Another active listening strategy is to not think about your response, but really listen to see if you truly understand what the other person is saying. When you respond, ask a clarifying question, which will make the person believe that you are genuinely trying to understand their idea, problem, or point of view.

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    Colby Stewart

    The one thing that i have realized about my self is that i would answer my office phone when i had a member of my team in my office. Since i have completed this part of the course i no longer answer my office phone when i have a staff member talking to me. I apologize to one member of my staff that i had in my office the the day before and interrupted them in mid conversion and answered my office phone.

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      Lance Leblanc

      Colby, that is an excellent way to be an effective communicator. It also shows respect for the person in your office. If I was the officer in that situation I would be appreciative.

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      Jennifer Hodgman

      Excellent point Colby. I, at times have also struggled with this. I make it a personal point to be present in my communications and in my interactions with staff. For me this would mean, not answering the phone, being present in their conversations and not thinking about other things I may have to do.

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    Colby Stewart

    I agree with you Nancy, effective communication is crucial in all aspects of our lives personal and professionally.

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    Frank Acuna

    As leaders, you must have the influence to accomplish the goals of your agency. There are many factors associated with having influence, one of which is the ability to effectively communicate. Building influence relies on your ability to be seen as a credible, trustworthy and experienced leader. Effective communication is key when building trust with your team. When sharing information or seeking input, they must trust that you are being honest and also trust that sensitive information is passed up the chain without leaving them with a target on their backs. This is important for those who want to share areas of improvement, but do not want to be seen as ruffling feathers. In order for communication to be effective, you must also learn to LISTEN. This is sometimes the most difficult part of a conversation, as most people start formulating responses while the other person is still talking. However, when the other person is seeking to be heard, you fail when you miss their complete message. You can also fail because your feedback should be based upon a complete picture of the problem.

    Frank

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    Magda Fernandez

    Communication is so important and multifaceted. Being a great leader means there must be effective communication with people at multiple levels. For people to listen, the person communicating must have the knowledge, the credibility and the relationships with people. Active listening is also a large component of effective communication. People must be able to understand each other’s perspectives or points of view. Now with all the distractions around us today, it is easy to be distracted during a conversation or be inpatient and interrupt the speaker to get out points across. It is a conscious thought to be an active listener and to think things though when we communicate. Other things we must be mindful of is our body language. Some people have no self-awareness of how they come across with their body language and gestures combined with what they say. They don’t possess the ability to read the audience and adjust accordingly. They are completely unaware of how they make people feel which tends to alienate people from that person and depending upon who that person is, those feelings can carry a rippling effect across an organization.

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    Magda Fernandez

    Frank, I completely agree with your post. Leaders must be credible, and that credibility does not come from their rank. It must be earned. I also agree with you when you say part of being a good leader is being a good listener. Too often we deal with people who interrupt in the middle of what you are saying or get on their phones to answer a text or a call. You find yourself repeating things you said that they missed, or they miss the point of the conversation all together. I know I used to do that, until someone brought it to my attention. Once I figured it our and people did it to me, I understood how annoying and rude it was. I try to have patience but it is hard.

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    Drauzin Kinler

    In this module I learned that effective leadership is crucial in being a good leader. This is an area of improvement I would say my entire agency needs to invest in if we want to progress our agency and our culture. So many times, you learn about things going on within the agency from someone who isn't even a member of the agency. Effective communications is neglected in so many ways. I just think about times I meet with my supervisor and think how rushed the meeting are and how the communications from both sides did not accomplish anything. You leave these meeting and feel as though they were a waste of time. I have learned when meeting with my subordinates just how important is it not to rush what they are trying to communicate. You have to make time and listen to what is being said and provide a truthful, proper response.

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    Monte Potier

    I agree that communication is one of the most important part of being an effective leader. On many occasions I have given facial expressions that were not a positive way to communicate. My non-verbal messages have made some employees feel like I am not interested in them. I need to make a conscience effort to be a better listener and to watch my non-verbal clues I give to my employees.

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    Henry Dominguez

    I think that all of you are spot on. I think that communication is an revolving trait. The lecture brought up a great point in regards to being an effective communicator you must have credibility. I couldn't agree with this more. We had a sergeant who loved to hear himself talk; however, amongst the line level troops, he had no credibility so no one listened to him. Also, how we communicate now as opposed to years past is completely different. Being brash and matter of fact does not work as well with the millenials. Knowing your who your audience is always a factor when trying to communicate.

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      Jason Porter

      Your audience is exactly right. I know that in my department, there are folks that I can talk to one way and folks that I have to talk to another way. There is definitely a generational gap among the ranks. We have a slew of new recruits that you almost have to hold by the hand in your communication techniques and the old hands it is more of a straight forward approach.

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    Jason Porter

    Being able to effectively communicate with our team along with people we interact in our daily lives is necessary to become an effective leader. Having the credibility with your team is earned through time and experience. Being able to resolve interpersonal conflict in the workplace is crucial in building that trust as a leader. Giving your staff the confidence to discuss things with you rather than just argue with you or their co-workers.

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      I completely agree with your post. I recently just started with a brand new team of deputies and there have been a few communication issues that have come up. I would point out at as well that being able to trust the leader is one of the first steps to having a successful team in my opinion. That leader needs to make expectations clear and then learn to trust the team and it return, the team will trust the leader. That will build confidence for everyone and will benefit everyone in time.

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    Joey Prevost

    You cannot properly influence others if you cannot communicate with them. it is essential to establish credibility. If that is lost, so will be your message. You have to first show expertise, being squared away and trustworthiness. This way miscommunications can be brought to a desirable outcome

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      Dan Wolff

      It’s always easier to follow someone who is a great communicator. How did they get their message across in a level of competence to meet the recipient’s knowledge level? A desirable outcome would be the message was delivered and received. If that process didn’t happen then of communication didn’t take place only an exchange of words.

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    Mike Brown

    Effective communication is crucial in any work environment. People want to interact with others who not only listen but can exchange positive information or feedback. I was once told that if someone wants to speak with you that they should have your undivided attention. So if your on the computer you should turn away from it and look that person in the eyes.

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    Dan Wolff

    Consistency in communication should be adhered to at all times as well. Levels of communication needs to flow smoothly from an upward chain to the lowest and be presented with the 3 keys. Also, when communicating you need to be self-aware of non-verbal actions. These nonverbal actions can send the wrong message when communicating. Are you standing with your arms crossed? Looking at your watch or phone periodically? Looking past the person talking or stopping them when they are trying to talk to pay attention to someone else. Be more self-aware of how you are communicating back in a non-verbal way

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      Samuel Lucia

      Dan you pointed out the need to be aware of nonverbal actions. I agree, nonverbal communication is huge. When interacting with someone, they will know in a heartbeat if you're genuine or not.

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      Samantha Reps

      I agree with you, staff always want to feel that what they are saying we are listening to and if we don't pay attention to our non-verbal cues we can hinder progress in the conversation.

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    Ray Bonillas

    What I learned within this lecture is that you must an active listener first before you can be an effective communicator. Before you can influence other to achieve a shared or common goal, you must get to know and understand your personnel. You have to come an expert in the field of discussion or mission to build that trust with your personnel and display the correct level enthusiasm to buy-in. Without active listening, you would not be aware on whether your personnel understood your direction of tasks give or whether they have a better way at achieving your goals. Effective communication allows us to ensure everyone is on the same page and redirect is necessary. This also including the ability to read non-vebal cues.

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      Christopher Savoie

      I agree, a effective listener will reduce miscommunications. Especially when we are talking about interpersonal conflict.

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    Lance Leblanc

    Effective communication is not as easy as it sounds. Often leaders including myself have failed in this area. When it talked about manage interpersonal conflict, I took note because I have been argumentative and have yelled at subordinates before. I knew at the time that probably wasn't the best way to handle it but I let my emotions get the best of me.

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    David Cupit

    Competent communication is the key to being a great leader. Working with different individuals can generate feelings of all kinds. These range from irritation, anger, frustration, disappointment, hurt, fear, futility, despair, hate bitterness and discouragement. Sometimes it's best to back away and listen before you respond.

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    Chasity Arwood

    Communication is an essential part of being a good leader. Goals can not be accomplished if those under your command do not understand or they feel intimidated by the way we speak to them. I must also remember that failure to communicate clearly can lead to mistrust and anger.

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      Judith Estorge

      I've experienced this, mistrust and anger, during my time in patrol as an officer. Credibility is essential in retaining control and keeping officers in line. Once lost it is almost impossible to regain.

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      Jarvis Mayfield

      Also if the team player is not being communicated to in the right manner, I feel that the communicator/leader will lose credibility and the team player will not want to provide valuable feedback.

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    Judith Estorge

    Communication is the most difficult part of leadership. Being able to articulate what I'm trying to say is a challenge. To stay focused and listening without wanting to interrupt or think ahead takes practice and continual work. In the section, Role of communication, "misunderstandings are inherent in communication" is a reminder to keep working toward improvement.

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    Christopher Savoie

    Of course effective communication is essential to being a effective leader. This is something that the leaders of my department and myself could improve on. I feel I need to improvement with my verbal aggression. I sometimes have trouble with control my nonverbal clues when I am upset.

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      Clint Patterson

      Christopher, most people only think of effective communication as being able to speak clearly and appropriately. But like you referenced about nonverbal clues, those can be more effective when communicating when we are delivering a message to your subordinates or supervisors.

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    Royce Starring

    Effective communication is vital for the success of your department. If information is communicated though the department incorrectly or is received incorrectly will determine how a task is competed. One of the biggest problems with communication is that supervisors only communicate one way, they give out communication but fail to receive it.

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    Samuel Lucia

    One would think the word communication in and of itself describes the act of talking, but what stuck out to me in the lecture was listening. A good communicator listens.

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      Laurie Mecum

      Yes I agree, part of being a good communicator is listening. Today people are so distracted with other things, its hard to get someone to sit and listen. I am guilty of this. Good thing is, I recognized it and so did my people under me so its something we were able to work on.

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    Clint Patterson

    To become an effective leader, you must be well trained in effective communication. The ability to influence your colleagues is essential if we wish to reach or share a goal. Many times we have seen a lack of understanding or making something too convoluted quickly leads to misunderstanding. Effective communication is not only vital in our profession, but our personal life also. If we don’t effectively communicate with our children, then they will often misinterpret what we are trying to address with them about sharing a common goal in life. I also feel that a good listener can be very effective in communication, much like a hostage negotiator.

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      Lance Landry

      Clint I think you are correct. Influencing your colleagues/subordinates is very difficult without influence. How do we properly influence colleagues/subordinates? It is done through learning to effectively communicate. Effective communication is accomplished by listening, encouraging, clearly defining what expectations are expected, and learning to resolve interpersonal conflict.

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      dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

      Clint, that's the first thing that came to my mind. The first thing we tell new recruits when we "train" them on some basics of negotiating, is that the biggest thing they can do is listen. Too often we think that if we are not speaking then we are not accomplishing anything. When in reality we always learn more by listening.

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    Laurie Mecum

    Being an effective communicator is imperative in life. Not only in the work environment but home too. Without it, a leader won’t be able to get their goals across to their followers. Plans will fall apart as well. You also need to be a good listener. I have been guilty of people coming to talk to me and being preoccupied on other things. There are also leaders that like to communicate behind email. That’s a big problem with technology today. People don’t want to get from behind the desk and have face to face conversations with people anymore. It is too easy to just send a message. We all know the problems with that is, it can be mis-read and interpreted incorrectly.

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      Amanda Pertuis

      Very well said Laurie. I'm guilty sometimes of communicating with email when I should communicate in person.

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    Christian Johnson

    Being an effective communicator is essential in all walks of life, professional and personal.

    As Dr. Long pointed out that “Leadership is a process whereby an individual influences individuals or a group of people through effective communication to achieve a shared outcome or goal.” Simply put, without effective communication, you are not leading.

    I believe that listening is just as important to communicating effectively. I see this neglected often and it is always detrimental to the interaction.

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      David Ehrmann

      I agree. Leaders within an agency tend to “tell” their subordinates what they want, what should happen, or how to do it. As creditable leaders, we need to do better at listening to our followers. This will enhance our credibility as leaders.

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      Rocco Dominic, III

      I also believe listening is just as important if not more. If a person is not listening intently the can actually misunderstand what the other person said. We as a society are to dependent of cell phone, computers, ect. Put them away, shut them off and listen to the person.

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        Jarvis Mayfield

        I agree I remember the times when family really sat down and talked to each other. I've seen my kids texting each other while sitting in the same room. As a family at dinner time there's no phone use. We play this game call best part, worst part and funniest part of the day which allows each member of the family to communicate how their day went.

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      James Schueller

      Your point of "Without effective communication, you are not leading"...Excellent. In my own post (before I saw yours to reply to) I had the same observation that listening is often neglected when discussing communication. We want to be heard when giving our feedback, opinions, or suggestions, so why wouldn't we (as leaders) not give the same consideration to those we interact with? I can get frustrated when people equate rank with always being right- they are not one in the same. Communication must be two-way to be effective in all but certain tactical environments.

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    David Ehrmann

    Communication is critical for law enforcement professionals. As a front line officer, an effective communicator can help identify and understand the problems with the citizens they interact with. A creditable leader who can communicate effectively will be able to manage conflict within an agency, understand the needs of followers, and listen to the issues plaguing the agency’s success.

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      mtroscla@tulane.edu

      Effective communication can solve citizen complaint problems earlier and with more efficiency that allowing issues to fester.

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    Amanda Pertuis

    It is important for leaders to be effective communicators. Marshall Goldsmith made a good point with the biggest mistakes when asking for input from others. I agree that starting sentence with no, but, or however is a mistake because I feel that you don’t value my opinion. I also agree with his suggestion of back away and listen. The entire module gave some great information.

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      Nicole Oakes

      I agree the module provided invaluable information about communication. I also appreciated that Marshall Goldsmith made points on not starting the sentence with no, but, and however. I will pay more attention to how I approach others and if I use these words in my communications.

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    Roanne Sampson

    During this lessons, I learned the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded because of the cold weather and poor communication between NASA and an engineering company . John O' Leary pointed out three myths of communication, "dissent equals disloyalty, criticism of an idea equals criticism of an individual and disagree with consensus equals not a good player." Communication is vital part of effective leadership. It sends messages to others. People communicate through words, body language and sign language. Communication also "inspires, engages and brings people in." Can you remember a time when you received a miscommunication from another individual?

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    Rocco Dominic, III

    Dr. Long stated, “Leaders need to be competent Communicators in order to enhance credibility, communicate expectations, share information. Leaders must also be great listeners. If we get distracted by our surroundings we can actually misinterpret the conversation. It takes both communications and listening skills to be an effective leader.

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    Nicole Oakes

    I have long understood that active listening is key to communication. I have been a Crisis Negotiator for 18 years. During that time I have had the opportunity to use what I was taught and experienced as a negotiator on my job. To communicate with others is not only about active listening but it should be understood that credibility is key. It has been repeatedly said through-out all of the modules that trust is key to leadership. If a person does not trust you, it will not matter what you say or do, or how you listen, the communication will be broken.

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      Donnie

      That's a very valid point that should be expanded upon in any communication lecture. Sometimes we hear what others are saying but we are not actively listening. And when you do listen ask questions about what you've been told to show you've been paying attention. Now you have gained trust.

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      Burke

      I agree. Listening is one of the most important parts of communication. Are you listening to respond or listening to understand.

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        I concur with this statement that the ability to comprehend what is stated to you from people around you. If you do not understand what is being asked of you, or what you are seeking out. Communication breaks down and mistakes are made in the exchange of information. When Dr. Long speaks about building credible leaders, the team is encouraged to participate in processes. It is also encouraged to share and integrate information appropriately.

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    Jarvis Mayfield

    I believe that the worst thing that could happen to a business is that it is filled with disloyalty and disagreement with consensus (not being a team player). I've seen this practice for several years tear away and cause a divide within an organization. I think that leaders need to be competent communicators in order to break the cycle of this divide. Using the tools of sharing, managing conflict and enhancing credibility are some but not all tools needed to complete the task.

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    mmcnab@spokanepolice.org

    “I am a Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPAC) evaluator and am testing the system”

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    Lance Landry

    Effective communication is a must in leadership. In order to be an effective leader one must first learn to listen and actually hear what is being said. Dr. Long stated that leaders must “Listen to provide appropriate and personal feedback to your subordinates.” One of the most enduring traits that I have experienced in successful leaders is they stopped everything they were doing when I entered the room to speak with them. They did not answer phone calls nor did they continue typing or writing while I was addressing them. As a subordinate this instilled in me early that the leader was truly “listening” and “focused” on what I had to tell them.

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      McKinney

      You touched on a valuable point on being a leader, and that is being able to listen. As a subordinate myself to the chain of command, it is refreshing to know that a successful leader who is engaged with organization members often practices effective communications.

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    Donnie

    Communication is a key skill in productivity. The lines of communication up, down, and laterally. Even at the lowest level it moves up and laterally at a minimum. I quickly learned as a young platoon sergeant in the military that sharing information with your subordinates after a leadership meeting was vital to a well-informed platoon. My troops always wanted to be in the know when we had training meetings. In order to convey the platoon leader or commander’s intent to them I gave them the important parts that directly affected them. I would communicate to my junior NCO’s what was expected of them and then gave them a time line to have a task accomplished. At the same time, I would communicate with the other platoon sergeants for something that may have been missed or not even brought up to help eliminate “show stoppers” during duty and aided in meeting the commander’s intent for the day or for that mission.

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    McKinney

    Through the course of my law enforcement career, I have been honored to serve under superior leaders who promoted growth within their ranks. There are many attributes that each leader possessed, but the biggest quality that they all had in common was the ability to communicate, especially listening. I can only manage the amount of time they allocated to speaking and listening to others, especially me. Now that I've assumed a role similar to my mentors, I know why it is an essential requirement for leaders to be effective communicators.

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      Lieutenant John Champagne

      I also had a few great leaders in my career. When a leader effectively communicates it makes the team members feel as though they are part of something important. The team member realizes he/she is part of the solution moving forward and this can be empowering.

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    Lieutenant John Champagne

    Communication is important for a leader in order to get the mission accomplished. Dr. Long stated “effective communicators are effective listeners”. Leaders must also be able to listen to their team members. Staying off the cell phone and giving that person your undivided attention shows that the information given to you by your team member is equally important as the orders you are giving out. We would not stand for this action when we are giving out orders therefore we should not stand for it when we are receiving feedback.

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    Burke

    I've always thought that listening is was one of the most important parts of effective communication. Active listening and not listening to respond.

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      jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

      Active listening is a huge part of effective communication. Being able to listen to what is actually being said, instead of listening to provide a response or solution. There was actually a session on active listening when I went through a portion of the FBI LEEDA class. I don't think the lesson actually sunk in until I was with my wife and she was talking to me about her problems at work. So I changed the way I listened to actually sit down and actively listen to what she was saying. Might sound cheesy, but it worked.

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        I always enjoyed Active Listening Courses and now that I teach it several times a year I find my use of the skill to increase each time I repeat the information. The best part is that is works in all aspects of life, professional, family, and in general. I used to often catch myself often trying to multitask while I hold a conversation. After teaching Active Listening I realized just how disrespectful and in-effective that truly is. The paying of attention to anyone, especially your wife, is an investment that tells them they are important and you respect them.

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    jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

    I identified the need of being an effective communicator a long time ago in my career. It was exacerbated when I took on the role of supervisor and I knew that I had to identify that it was a weakness of mine. Without even knowing or putting a name to it, I learned that you had to have the 3 components of credibility, expertise, dynamism and trust. One area I find myself working on still to this day is dynamism. I have to actively tell myself not to fall into a place of being passive, not being complacent and being active or dynamic within my organization.

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      cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

      Communication is still one of my weaknesses. It has been a work in progress my whole career. I also have to be mindful of falling into being complacent. This module was a good reminder of how important effective communicating is.

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    cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

    This module was the best so far. I was a senior in high school when the space shuttle exploded. Lack of effective communication caused this to happen. The engineering company essentially caved to the pressure from NASA. John O’Leary said in the video Dissent = Disloyalty and if you Disagree you are not a team player. I have had this feeling with past supervisors who were not great communicators. I felt like if I disagreed, I was not being a team player. I also need to become a better listener with the people under my command. Communication is the key to success.

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      Major Stacy Fortenberry

      Beaman, I posted my comment below prior to reading yours. Seems we have had similar experiances. Hmm. We can learn just as much from bad leadership as good leadership. we just need to remember how it made us feel and not make the same mistakes.

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        anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

        I agree bad leaders has left their mark on many organizations, but it is up to us to help change the future of our organizations.

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      Adam Gonzalez

      Perhaps even greater...active listening is the key to success?! I have been reminded many times throughout my life that we as humans have two ears and one mouth and to act accordingly. I believe this myself, but I sometimes have to be reminded of it.

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    While this module was relatively short, the importance is huge. Communication is a skill that must be worked on and refined in order to see success in anything you do. I have been blessed in my career to have had the opportunity to get involved in crisis negotiation. While we have a formula or stairway to follow, the first step on that journey is "Active Listening Skills." I have gotten more involved with Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) the past several years and here again we see an emphasis on "Active Listening Skill." This is basically training on communication. We learn to convey that we are paying attention and understand where someone may be coming from. When we are in a leadership position we have to make sure those lines of communication of open and that the people we are working with understand that.

    Since the beginning of my career over 28 years ago I have learned contempt for the term "yes man." I have heard the stories and seen the results when leaders inadvertently are surrounded with these people who tell him what he wants to hear and not communicate what is really going on. The motivation for "yes Men" are varied. Some see it as a way to advance a career while others are simply scared to tell the leader something think will upset the leader. Regardless of the reason, the result is nearly always negative. Communication is honest information sharing. The credibility of the source is important. Just as Active Listening Skills teaches that it is not the words that matter but the tone and body language. In effective communication there must be credibility of from all sources.

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    michael-beck@lpso.net

    I really enjoyed presentation from John O’Leary. It gave me a lot to think about when it came to communication with my fellow officers especially the portions of having independent think tanks, independent deliberation, and Devil’s advocate. I have already started to build an anonymous questionnaire for those who work on my shift to find out what they want from me, the shift, and the agency. I have been in meetings and felt the wrath of being in opposition on an opinion of either my supervisors or the group. I want the deputies to feel as if they are not being judged and that they have a voice and role to play in the changing of their work environment. I want them to know that their opinion matters, even if it is not shared by everyone. Only after the questionnaires are compiled will I bring them together as a group to build a working consensus for better operations of the shift.

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      Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

      That is a great idea and I believe it has the potential to open up a great communication avenue for your subordinates, free from any possible reprimand. More often than not they do not want to go against the "status quo" and will quite possibly feel more secure in putting true communication in through the questionnaire. I have actually sat in a staff meeting and had a deliberation with myself wondering if it was worth the fight to bring up an issue that would be against most of the higher superiors viewpoint.

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    Major Stacy Fortenberry

    I have had leaders that gave the impression that they were better than their subordinates and refused to listen. I never realized how many times during a conversation that their sentence would start with no, but. or however. looking back I realize that their words were dismissive of my thoughts and showed their stubbornness and inflexibility. These leaders taught me what not to do and this part of the lesson I will definitely keep in mind when communication with team members. Truly listening before speaking makes a world of difference.

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      cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

      It's amazing how those three little words change our communication and how it will make us slow down before we answer.

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    mtroscla@tulane.edu

    Communication is the key for everything we do in our lives and it is, sadly, a skill where many people are lacking. We often don't give much care to our word choices and this can taint a listener's view of our message even if it is unintentional.

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    cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

    Communication is the key to anything, as all of us know. The part that I learned so much from was about changing the way we communicate. It is surprising how just a few words will change the way we say something.

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    anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

    This lecture was good in pointing out the ways of communicating, I agree being a leader we should learn to manage Interpersonal conflict because we can cause a blemish to our integrity by using verbal aggression.

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      chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

      I agree, sometimes we just need to stop and listen. How we respond and communicate makes a difference in our credibility.

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    Crisis defines organizations and leaders. During the crisis is one of the most important ways we are looked at by the community we serve. These communications can make or break us not only as a leader but an agency. During this health emergency, we have to be on point with our conversations and orders. Social media communication and officers educating the public are all key right now.

    As a PIO, we have to be credible in our leadership. We have to be willing to be truthful no matter how good or bad we did. We are judged by not only the media but our communities.

    Effective communication as a leader = Credible Leadership

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    chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

    In Module 7, I learned that communication is a dynamic process, and that you always want to create the foundation. I know as a leader I make sure that I maintain trust with my shift to ensure that my credibility isn't wavered in any type of way.

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      guttuso_fa@jpso.com

      Yes. Your credibility is everything to those who work under your command. If you lose their trust, even if it was a miscommunication, it is going to take a long time to regain that trust, if ever.

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    Adam Gonzalez

    The three components of credible leaders brings to mind that which I need to focus on and work at. In particular of these is expertise. Since promoting years ago, it has become near common place to find myself "stuck" at my chair, in my office, at my desk. As has been shared repeatedly throughout this course thus far, this is not leading. The boxes that I find my mind focusing on that need to be checked off instead of the people that I am to labor beside are the resources that need my attention and time. Expertise of the skills that my subordinates must master have to be a priority for me to renew and remain proficient at or I lose the first stated component of a credible leader.

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      Thomas Martin

      I agree that we will fail to lead our subordinates from behind the desk. We have to make the time to get out in the field and show them what they are capable of. There is no way for them to follow in our footsteps if we are shackled to our desk. As you said we must keep our expertise sharp, and the only way to accomplish this is execution.

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    Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

    "Great achievements can only come after great conversations"... is one of the many notes i jotted down through this module. In order to be a participant in a great conversation we now know we must be willing to listen and truly give our undivided attention when doing so to make the other participants in the conversation feel valued. I'm sure we have all had a conversation get cut short by a leader when we disagree with their views, but how great would it be if all involved felt comfortable enough to fully and truthfully express their views knowing that the other party was actually listening. After this module I feel one of the biggest aspects of effectively communicating is actively listening.

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      steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

      I agree, nothing feels as hopeless when you are trying to communicate something and you can tell there is no active listen from the other side. Makes you wonder why you attempt to communicate.

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        sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

        I've run into that problem with certain individuals. I've come to learn some people are hardheaded and stubborn no matter how well your thoughts are communicated. Just need to stay on top that person till they finally understand.

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    ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

    Effective communication is definitely a very important key. We have probably all had leaders that did not have time to listen. They only barked orders and told you to get out of the office. This is an excellent tool to break that cycle. We must communicate and make sure everyone understands and has their chance to offer ideas or the organization will never move forward.

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    guttuso_fa@jpso.com

    In recent weeks I have learned the pitfall of poor communication and mostly my lack of it to people under my command. The problem is if your are not totally clear and concise people will start filling in the holes with what they believe should be in those holes and most of the time they are wrong which leads to miscommunication of your original intent. Effective communication is essential in our business.

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      I agree with you completely. How many times in our lives have we been told to do something by our parents or supervisors and once the task was completed, we find out it was done completely wrong. Clear and precise instructions are critical for success.

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      I agree with you. We must have good communication skills, verbal and written, in our profession. As you pointed out, if you are not concise in the communication, someone might fill in the gaps and this would lead to a misunderstanding or miscommunication. I have had the opposite problem. I have spelled out very specific instructions for some that I did not believe, or had stated that they did not fully understand a task. I have been told that I was treating someone like a child because of these instructions. It is a thin line we have to walk between letting an officer show some personal initiative and giving instruction; 1-2-3, that we want followed.

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    steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

    Very great segment and the issue of managing interpersonal conflict when communication is key. Ff one or more in the conversation can not manage to keep emotions under control, then the communication has failed. I will work to improve this in myself in the future. I also thought that different methods of communication would have been discussed with different generation or personalities in this section. I think understanding the different methods of communicating to different group sets would be effective in assuring that all members receive the message.

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    Clear and Effective Communication is essential for the success of a group or organization. Throughout the address, I thought about how often we listen to what someone is trying to communicate, but at times we are developing our response before the statement has ended. By doing so, this can cause a significant breakdown in communication. This lesson will help me in keeping a more open dialogue with my coworkers and effectively keeping the trust between everyone.

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    sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

    Learning to stop saying "No, But, and However" and instead to back away and listen has been a problem for me personally. Over the past year changing that behavior and communicating and leading my shift has proved very beneficial. I've learned alot and will continue to learn to back away and listen and let them do the jobs that they already know to do. Ill be there for guidance.

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      clouatre_kj@jpso.com

      I agree that the short video related to saying "NO, BUT and HOWEVER" was very eye opening. There are so many times that I use those words personally and professionally. It was nice to learn that eliminating those three words from the beginning of sentences could really make a big impact to others.

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    wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

    Communication is definitely the key to success. As superiors we must step back, listen and trust my subordinates will get the job done. This module Effective Communication taught me to it takes both communication and listening skills to be an effective leader.

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      blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agreed with you. I was taught when I started my career that communication is essential to be a great leader. I have also learned that I need more work on my listening to skills.

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    clouatre_kj@jpso.com

    The TED talk intro for the Effective Communication Module was interesting. The 3 Myths that keep people silent in group settings were new to me but absolutely make sense. I think people hesitate to disagree with an idea for fear that they will seem to be disloyal or not to be a team player. It is imporant for us to create an environment for open and honest communication. As a leader, confident communication from me will set the standard for my team and will build credibility.

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    This module is short and to the point, this is ironic because I believe it demonstrates the method needed for aspects of leadership. Leadership needs to be direct, concise, clearly stated goals, and effective. Dr. Long lends credence to the three elements needed for credible leadership via expertise, dynamism and trust. People truly can listen to you and not hear what is said. Conversely, people who wish to be heard by their "leader" may have it fall upon deaf ears. We all can improve upon the ability to listen more effectively.

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      cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree that we all improve upon the ability to listen more effectively. Well said.

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    Reading some of the previous posts, I have to agree that this module was short and sweet, but informative. I remember, in the academy to eliminate three words from my vocabulary, routine, average and typical. The point was made for writing police reports and while I had not been told that so directly since, now; no, but and however. It is a good lesson and one that I hope that I can emulate.

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      dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

      You said it best, short and sweet. Too bad lessons in being a good communicator isn't short and sweet, or else we would all be experts.

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    dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

    Although this presentation is very short, becoming an effective communicator is not. Speaking effectively, especially in the arena we work in, takes time, failed attempts, feedback, and especially an open mind.

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    dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

    I think as an agency one of the most important things and yet it is one of our biggest struggles is communicating. I have been in meetings with supervisors where I couldn't speak a word and I have learned myself that by listening, it's just as critical as speaking. I think we have become too dependent on technology, where things are now communicated by text or email, instead of even just a phone call or face to face. This occurs in our careers as well as our home life.

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    blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

    While watching this module and I self-reflected on my communication skills. I learned that I need to stop trying to talk and be a better listener. I need to learn to take a breath before speaking, gather my thoughts then speak. Often, I have noticed myself interrupting people when they speak to justify what course of action was necessary instead of listening to their point of view and gathering more information.

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      dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

      Beau, I noticed the same thing about myself in regards to not communicating, and just waiting to reply. I was reminded recently by someone that we were given two ears and one mouth because we should listen more than we talk.

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    cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

    I like how Dr. Long discussed how credibility is essential to effective communication. In law enforcement, credibility is crucial to our roles with our coworkers and the communities we serve. Our ability to help others is dependent upon our ability to effectively communicate to avoid misunderstandings or misinformation.

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    Lt. Mark Lyons

    I agree that effective communication is one of the most important aspects of leadership. I thought this training module did a good job of delivering the message in such a short amount of time. Over the last couple of years, our agency has put a lot of focus on training staff about the importance of effective communication. We developed a training course on effective communication that we cover each year during in-service training. One of the main topics we address is "effective listening". After watching this training module, I have a new perspective on on the subject and a few new ideas on ways we can improve our training methods going forward.

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    dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

    I agree that communication plays a huge roll in leadership throughout any agency. Though it plays such a large role, communication lines are often not open in many agencies, especially between different divisions. A vast majority of the time my division, patrol, is left out of the communication circle when it comes to the activities of other divisions, such as the narcotics division. Often times, information wants to be received, but the receiver rarely wants to send information back.

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      dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree communication between divisions within an organization is very important.

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    mmoscona@floodauthority.org

    This module was short, but was it effective. To be an effective leader we must learn how to first listen and evaluate what is being said both verbally and nonverbally. Then we can respond in the appropriate manner. Our response must be competent and credible.

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    dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

    One word makes the difference in this module. Effective! If you remove the word effective from this module it is irrelevant. You can have communication but it needs to relevant and effective. Without being effective you will fail.

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    James Schueller

    Communication is the cornerstone to effective leadership. This module links communication to leadership and credibility, and those three are intertwined in every aspect of our professional lives. The module then took credibility another step deeper with 3 components of credibility, noting that the most important of the 3 (Expertise, Dynamism, and Trust) was Trust. I could not agree more. In my eyes and after being in the same organization for 21 years, without trust there is no credibility. This (trust) needs to be present both up and down the chain of command. I feel that a lot of time and effort is put into talking to people and telling people what to do, but not enough is spent listening and getting feedback. Because of this, I liked the learning point that said leaders need to be competent communicators to..."Develop argumentative competence rather than verbal aggression." We as leaders need to influence people to do the right thing so that they understand the 'Why' and the 'How' , thereby preparing future leaders.

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      Joseph Flavin

      Trust, like in any relationship, is key. Without trust there is no credibility. I liked how he laid out the 3 components of credibility and emphasized trust as the most important component. I agree with you that trust needs to be present up and down the chain of command.

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      Christopher Lowrie

      Great points. Organizations really suffer when their is a broken line of communication. Everyone needs to be "in the loop" to a certain extent on what is going on with the department. Everyone also needs to feel empowered to criticize an idea. Taking the time to explain the 'how' and 'why' really is the key to effective leadership.

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      Kelly Lee

      I could not agree more with you Jim. Trust being the biggest most important component of credibility is a MUST both up and down the chain of command. I often think most within an agency or organization think that the further up the chain of command goes the harder it is to trust "them." You talk about lots of time being spent on talking to people but not enough time being spent on listening and getting feedback. I think one of the best things our office has done to help overcome this is to develop the Sheriff's Advisory Board where we meet with senior mgmt. to talk about and discuss things happening in the department, equipment needs and they for the most part accept what we decide as a group.

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    What a fantastic module. Effectively communicating is so essential to everything we do in our line of work. It isn't just with employees to supervisors but to how we speak with the public. If everyone thought a bit more about how they were seen as a communicator and worked to improve their deficiencies maybe we wouldn't be in the mess we are now. Points laid out by Long and Goldsmith are one of the cornerstones of being an effective leader.

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      Mitchell Gahler

      I agree that communication is essential in our profession, not just for supervisors, but with everyone we have contact with. I think it's crazy how people communicate these days, which can be misconstrued in so many ways, such as text messaging, emails, etc. The art of communication appears to be difficult sometimes if it's not delivered correctly. In my experience, punctuation and tone of voice is important, and it's sometimes misunderstood if you're unable to deliver it with direct communication.

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    Joseph Flavin

    Short but to the point. Effective communication is the backbone of communication. From co-workers to the public, if you do not communicate effectively your message can get lost in translation. Back when I taught DARE, we dedicated a lesson to effective communication to our 5th grade audience. Even at a young age effective communication is key. I don't think enough people understand how to be an effective communicator.

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    Lt. Marlon J Shuff

    A leader's most powerful tool is their ability to communicate their ideas and vision effectively. Equally important, influential leaders should also know when they need to speak, and when they need to listen. I have personally identified communication and active listening skills as areas where I can improve and have made efforts to do so.

    An essential component of communication is clarity. If your message is unclear and misunderstood, it is incumbent upon you as a leader to communicate at a level that someone can understand. Sometimes, the fault lies in the sender when the receiver doesn't receive the message. For this reason, communicating via email, while convenient, may not always be the best way to communicate.

    Marlon Shuff

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    Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

    Effective communication skills is something most law enforcement officer struggle with throughout their careers. Most officers are "alpha" and have trouble expressing their expectations without coming off in an aggressive manner. from the beginning of your career, you are taught to control your scenes, and you are in charge of the situation. We don't realize how good communication skills with control a hostile scene much better than an aggressive verbal tirade.

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      I agree with your statement. Effective communication is key with the citizens we serve. What I have noticed lately with new generations, is that most of their communication has been through social media platforms or text messaging. I feel that some have a hard time having a face to face conversation because they are not use to it. That has been one of my biggest struggles is getting our staff out their cars to visit with our citizens and I truly believe that it is because of our technology.

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    Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

    Effective communication can enhance your entire leadership career. There are many facets of communication that many won’t even use. Leaders have to be self-aware and show vulnerability in some conversations. Listening is one of the hardest tools we have but it is effective in building trust. Once you build trust with your subordinates you will be viewed as competent and credible.
    Throughout my career, I have matured and listening was a huge step in the process. I realized once my supervisor started listening it opened new avenues in accomplishing the goals that need to be completed. Your subordinates want to be heard so stop and listen.

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      I agree with the comment above.. "listening is one of the hardest tools we have". listening is crucial to understanding but the very nature of our job puts roadblocks in our path. Information overload is one of my biggest detractors. Sometimes I am so overwhelmed with emails, voicemails, notes and correspondence that its easy to get distracted when someone is talking with you. I realize this and counter its negative effects by turning off my monitor, silencing my phone, turning off my music and making a point to turn to the person wishing to speak and saying something to the effect.. "now I can give you my undivided attention".. I don't know how many times the other person has responded.. "oh you don't need to do that" but I know it helps convey that I am genuinely interested in what they have to say.

      Dave

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        Jacqueline Dahms

        I agree with your distractions and solutions you have come up with to help be a better listener. I also like to close my door when staff come see me. If I don't, I usually get unsolicited opinions about my conversations from my colleagues next door to me. Some of it can be productive but I will always seek others opinion if I need it. To me it also gives staff the freedom to say what they need to when we talk which builds trust.

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    Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

    Discussion #7
    In this module it has become noticeably clear that we as supervisors must listen to provide the appropriate response and or feedback to our subordinates. Today, I find myself in more situations where my attention is more needed now then in my past years as a supervisor. I find that when you are admired as someone that your subordinates trust they lean more on you for guidance.

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    Mitchell Gahler

    This module discussed the importance role of effective communication and how to minimize the misunderstandings in order to manage a complex work environment. The module discussed how an effective communication process may help influence others in order to achieve a common goal. I find that effective communication eliminates differences and proves to be an effective tool when dealing with those within the workplace and dealing with the general public. However, if there are differences, they can be discussed so everyone is on the same page. I like the statement made by John O'Leary as he states, "Great achievements only come after great conversation." Larry Long also discussed the importance of credibility. Although expertise and dynamism are important components, trust was identified as the most important. As leaders, if we can gain trust in the workplace, our credibility is identified which could be mimicked by other team members to create an effective work environment.

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    John O'Leary in this module stated the following "we conduct big conversations all the time and bring people together to do it." He went on to say that "the quality of our conversations, influence the quality of our decisions and the quality of our decisions dictate the quality of our outcomes." I couldn't agree more with his statements. As the leader of a large organization I need input from all areas of our department. If I don't take the time to have good quality conversations and sometimes just listen, I am not going to get the whole picture or all of the input and information. Not receiving all of this information can lead to poor decisions which could snowball into bad moral and the impression that I do not have the knowledge to lead the organization. I believe this is where the term I have heard several times before comes from, "those who are effective listeners are great communicators."
    We don't take conversations very serious

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    Jahner

    John O'Leary in this module stated the following "we conduct big conversations all the time and bring people together to do it." He went on to say that "the quality of our conversations, influence the quality of our decisions and the quality of our decisions dictate the quality of our outcomes." I couldn't agree more with his statements. As the leader of a large organization I need input from all areas of our department. If I don't take the time to have good quality conversations and sometimes just listen, I am not going to get the whole picture or all of the input and information. Not receiving all of this information can lead to poor decisions which could snowball into bad moral and the impression that I do not have the knowledge to lead the organization. I believe this is where the term I have heard several times before comes from, "those who are effective listeners are great communicators."

    Reply

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      Great comments, Sheriff. We need others to bring perspective. I am reminded of a saying (I'm going to completely thrash it) but it's something like; "you have to worry when others stop bringing you their problems." As leaders, we must be willing to listen to the bad things and not merely dismiss them. And we need people in the organization that can do this, respectfully, or as the instructor put it, "develop argumentative competence." I would much rather be surrounded by people that think differently than I do, yet have the same goals in mind, so we can challenge each other in ways to bring out the best for the organization.

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    I thoroughly enjoyed learning from John O’Leary in his TED Talk. He described a communication tool that I had not experienced, or at least that I can remember, previously…changing the context of the conversation and specifically encouraging independent deliberation. I believe this tool can be difficult for public safety leaders on so many levels. Most of us are “Type A” personalities and we like to have the great idea or the best solution. Allowing for the best outcomes takes teamwork and dedication to something greater than yourself. And to make that possible, as leaders, we have to communicate all the information so others that may be tasked with coming up with solutions, and why, can make informed decisions not only based on the information they are provided, but also filtered through their own expertise. We have an incredible hurdle, in my opinion, when it comes to sharing information. We withhold information as a part of practice in our field. Without providing all the information, we are merely setting others up to fail, or vicariously providing a framework to others to help further your own idea. Effective communication takes credibility, as we all learned in the module that followed, with three components; expertise, dynamism and trust. I look now at this a little differently applying John O’Leary’s message. We have to trust others, too; trust their expertise and trust that their dynamism will shine through when given all the information to help make an informed decision and the opportunity to do so.

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    While watching the presentation associated with this module, two significant concepts seemed to present themselves. The first was the 3 myths discussed by Dr. Long; Dissent = disloyalty, criticism of an idea = criticism of an individual and disagree with conscious = not a team player. I keyed in on criticism of an idea = criticism of an individual. I heard this concept and thought about a project (important policy) that I had put my heart and soul in to and I remember how I felt when I presented an over view to some peers who had some divergent thoughts about my draft product. I took their feedback personally as if they were criticizing me. the more that was said, the less I listened. Afterwards I did a self assessment of the situation and I realized I was over invested in the project and had to step away if I was going to value the input from my peers.

    The second statement that that got my attention was made by Marshall Goldsmith in his short video titled "Effective Leadership Communication". In this video Goldsmith states "leaders of the past tell and the leaders of the future ask". I think we have all worked for supervisors who have said "just do what I am telling you". When someone says this, there is no real communication taking place and according to Dr. Long can contribute to misunderstanding or interpersonal conflict. through my experience at my department and as a Lieutenant Colonel in the Army Reserve, I learned over time that I could accomplish more by ask people to do things through friendly conversation than by ordering someone to do something.

    Dave

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      Chad Blanchette

      Good points. I have personally had more success achieving goals with my team when I have asked for input. It is difficult, and I have been guilty of using the 3 forbidden words by Dr. Long. I think by getting input, it supports the theory of the 95% of people wanting to be part of something good.

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    Cynthia Estrup

    Communication is really the center of being successful in almost all aspects of our lives. That being said, as we look at our greatest communicators within our departments people are naturally drawn to them and their words. Being an effective communicator naturally builds upon an individuals ability to be trusted. Communication is not just about the spoken or written word, we need to ensure all people are receiving the message we are trying to put out. This is something, as a leader, we need to continue to build upon. At times, we put out an email and expect that all people have received the message with the same understanding. The reality is that this is very far from the truth. Many people will read tone that is not present in an email, and this will render the actual message as being lost.

    As leaders we need to make sure our message is being sent in ways that all our people are receiving it. But we also need to make sure that we are receiving the feedback of those around us as well. Communicating has to be a two way street. In our department, if providing feedback to someone they may receive it as being negative and "shut down". We need to make sure our team is receiving all the information and learning from it rather than letting it bring them down.

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      Maja Donohue

      You definitely have a good point and it is true that people are naturally drawn to good communicators. Having charisma and being eloquent is good, but only if you are credible as well. I also like that you focused on how people communicate and the way that their style, format, body language and choice of words can affect how the message is received.

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    Kyle Phillips

    I was surprised that through this module on communication that body language and approachability where not mentioned. Along with the great effective ways we communicate, I believe our non-verbal communications are equally as important. If we are not approachable, our superiors, subordinates and peers will be less likely to come to us and have conversations that allow us to use or communication skills and build credibility within the organization.

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      Ryan Lodermeier

      Yes, good point. They say most of our communication is done in a non verbal manner. As police officers we are taught so often to observe non verbal ques, body language, posture, and stance. These observations follow us into our professional communication as well and we can't ignore them while communicating with our officers.

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        Gregory Hutchins

        I agree that body language, or non-verbal, communications are essential yet overlooked. For most of my life, people tell me that my facial expressions speak volumes, even though I am very reserved and do not speak up. This topic was highly evident during my deployments. During highly heated planning sessions, where I knew there were challenges but knew I should save my opinion for another time, my commander would routinely look at me to see what expression I was trying to cover up. If highly noticeable, he would call on me for my analysis, which was often counter to that of my peers based on facts and not emotions. While this often ostracized me as these shortsighted planners needed to reevaluate and reconstruct their plan, in the end, it was the best action for the command and the national objectives. I preferred using closed-door meetings to address my concerns, but I know that through this transparent expression, we saved a valuable commodity in planning, time, through being able to have a voice of reason

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      Durand Ackman

      I was thinking the same thing about body language and now that you mention approachability that fits in as well. I could argue that our body language is more important that what we say. I've had several conversations where they other person's body language is clearly telling me they are not interested in what I have to say

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    Ryan Manguson

    This module reaffirmed my thoughts on the importance of effective communication in leadership. An important takeaway for me was the piece about trust in communication being key to successful communication. Trust plays a pivotal role in all parts of leadership as well effective communication.

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    Jennifer Hodgman

    This section served a nice reminder to slow down, take a breath and listen to one another instead of rushing to offer advice or opinions. I believe it is important to have self awareness and emotional intelligence about how ones communication styles are perceived by others. This is a vital step towards developing effective ways to communicate.

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    Maja Donohue

    In his TED Talk, Dr. Long said that encouraging open communication can be difficult in a group setting and that having each individual bring their own recommendations before a meeting is more effective. However (yes, I know I shouldn’t start a sentence with this word), doing so requires a foundation of mutual trust, meaning that the participants feel safe to share their honest opinion. This is exactly why he also stressed that trust is the most vital component of credibility. Ineffective leaders get offended with respectful discourse when in fact they should be grateful and even encourage such feedback. Reflecting on both successful and not so successful conversations is also critical for growth. Trust cannot exist without open and honest communication. To grow as credible leaders, we have to make steady contributions to our trust savings account with open and honest communication which will make effective communication possible in the long run.

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    Ryan Lodermeier

    I appreciate how this module touched on not beginning a sentence/reply with “No” “But” or “However”. So often when we communicate, we focus on what our reply will be while the person we are talking with is still attempting to communicate their point. As much as we try and hide this it can be obvious at times. Without us even realizing it this can send a nonverbal message to the other person that we are defensive and/or not open to what they have to say.

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      Eduardo Palomares

      I absolutely agree with this. We jump the gun too quickly and speak when we should be listening. This is a simple sign of poor communications on our part. If we listened more we would be better communicators. This happens too often even during criminal investigations where the interrogating Officer cuts off a suspect, therefore missing important information. I will be more aware of my active listening skills to be communicate with my subordinates, peers and supervisors.

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    Eduardo Palomares

    In this lecture I learned the way we communicate and how we communicate it’s vital for effective communications. Our words must in congruence with our actions to transmit trust. This module reminded me that effective communications are not only verbal. Effective communications are rooted in trust. People listen with their eyes as well. As a leader it is important to remember that in order to influence a group of people thru effective communications, you have to instill trust. Credibility and trust go together and the leader must be aware of this. Without, communications are rendered ineffective. Great module. Lots of take aways that l will use at work.

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    Chad Blanchette

    In this module, I found Dr. Longs Ted Talk most interesting. The 3 myths that keep people silent at times. 1. Dissent=Disloyalty 2. Criticism of an idea=Criticism of an individual 3. Disagree with the consensus of the group=Not a team player. The difficulty becomes in creating an atmosphere where teammates are not afraid to speak up without fear of retribution or the belief that if you do speak up that one of the myths would be applicable. The Challenger story that he shared with us left an impact with me. By failing to truly listen to members of the team can truly be catastrophic sometimes.

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    Jacqueline Dahms

    What John O'Leary in the TED video said resonated with me. He stated, "The quality of our conversations influences the quality of our decisions ...which dictates the quality of our outcomes". I often find some meetings are unproductive because once someone has an opinion someone always has a “but” to bring up. I also agree about dissent in a group setting being viewed as disloyalty, criticism being taken personally and disagreeing with a group as not a team player. I think this comes down to the credibility one has with the group.

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    Christopher Lowrie

    Effective communication is essential for a leader to be successful. I have personally witnessed unsuccessful leaders who did not possess this skill. They would lead with one way communication that was composed of yelling and arguing. Had they taken the time to listen to other ideas and reasons why decisions should be made their leadership tenure would have been longer and more influential. Effective leaders encourage the challenging of ideas and do not take it as a personal attack.

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      Matt Wieland

      I have had the same experience with certain leaders in my organization, especially early in my career. I don't know anyone who likes the type of leader who has to yell or argue to show their influence. This module even acknowledged that if leading by telling is the past, then leading by asking is the future.

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      Brad Strouf

      I agree with you. Some very smart people have shown themselves to be poor leaders because of their stubbornness and inability to listen to others and make sound decisions based on the best information.

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      Well said! As a leader, i have to be prepared to accept constructive criticism and viewpoints that differ from my own. It can be humbling, but it helps me make better decisions and lead more effectively.

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    Durand Ackman

    I was surprised how short this module was. I expected there to be more information regarding effective communication because it is so important for leaders to be successful. I really liked John O'Leary's Ted Talk video. I had never heard of the communication failure that led to the space shuttle disaster. The three myths he discussed were spot on. I've heard all of those from other people and can definitely relate to them myself. Dr. Long's discussion about credibility was good and he is absolutely correct that trust is the most important factor.

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      I'm right there with you! Especially with the Challenger Explosion. I remember watching it as a child, yet I've never heard about the communication failure about the O-rings. Obviously they did not want to loose everyone's trust in their ability, but good lord, how many times do the smartest people in the world need to be told, "Don't do it" before they understand. It sounds like their ego was to blame more than their communication.

      The three myths he discussed were spot on and could have been hammered out a little more. Hopefully it will make me more open to discussion rather than feeling the need to defend a position when someone shows opposition to a topic.

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    Robert Schei

    I enjoyed the section on the three elements of credibility; expertise, dynamism and trust. It is easy to understand that credibility creates the foundation for leadership. I typically try to apply lessons from each class to individuals whom I have worked with in the past. In this case it is easy to understand why people in leadership positions who were not experts in any area lacked credibility and also why those whom are in lesser positions but are clearly experts are sought after by others. Clearly trust plays a huge role in credibility but I struggle a bit with the idea of dynamism. The examples given were related to shining boots or having a well fitting uniform. I'm thinking that the role of active or passive employees is more of a style trait, for example do you take control of a struggling meeting or do you sit back and observe quietly. I believe there is value in both and regardless of your style or amount of dynamism you can be a credible leader.

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      Andy Opperman

      I agree Robert that you can be an effective leader with both an active level and passive level of dynamism. I also think on the flip side a person who is passive has a more difficult barrier to overcome as they may have to get past the first impression they have created with things like uniform appearence, etc...

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    Robert Schei

    I agree and like many others have witnessed this working against good people several times. How exactly do good, moral people who have a concern or disagreement with a process engage the chain of command who created the problem with out creating animosity. Unfortunately, not many in leadership positions are willing to be open minded and listen especially if they may be to blame. Some of the tips provided in this lesson may be the answer, but continued education on leadership techniques for those in positions of authority will also be of great benefit.

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    Matt Wieland

    The part of this module that meant the most to me is the concept that credibility forms the foundation of leadership. When I think about this concept, it is 100% true that everyone that I have worked for that I consider to be a good leader has been an excellent communicator. The 3 components to credibility are Expertise, Dynamism, and Trust. I have known leaders that are absolute subject matter experts, but are not at all dynamic and very passive in their approach. I have also known leaders that have the expertise and dynamism, but can't be trusted based on past experiences, and this makes it hard to follow them. I think if we continue to work on all areas of credibility with each encounter we have with a colleague, subordinate, or superior, we will continue to build credibility and effective communication. Every encounter with another person is important no matter how small or insignificant it might seem.

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    Brad Strouf

    Never start a sentence with No, But, or However. What a simple, yet brilliant rule to live by! I enjoyed the lecture and will be trying to implement these ideas. Communication is key. Credibility is such a huge part of positive communication.

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      Paul Gronholz

      That was great advice. I will have to try and see if I can do that. Also, listening is key to effective communication. We train extensively on effectively communicating with the public as Police Officers by building rapport, using active listening and remembering body language. How often can we use those same principles when communicating within our organization?

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      A good goal to shoot for. But do you think you can do it right away? :) Credibility and trust are huge and are the difference in actually listening to someone versus ignoring or discounting them right away.

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        Major Willie Stewart

        I agree but the correct way to communicate is to know your subordinates, and trust them. This trust opens their minds to actually listening to the message you are trying to get across.

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    Andy Opperman

    I thought John O' Leary brought up some great points when he talked about the myths of communication. With our professional field being structured as a paramilitary organization, rank and authority play an important role but often get in the way of our effective communication. People are often fearful of dissent because they do not want to seem disloyal or they will just agree with the group because it’s the easy thing to do. I do feel with experience people become more confident and some of the fear goes away, but I also feel that people who are emotionally intelligent can make important points without sounding disrespectful or arrogant to superiors. I think most superiors expect your honesty in a well thought out conversation. I also felt that Dr. Larry Long brought up an important point when talking about credibility. If you do not have credibility in your organization, people have probably stopped listening before you even started talking. Dynamism is important too, it really goes along with 1st impressions, you may only get one chance!

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      Great points Andy. I believe that in a meeting or discussion, particularly if it's surrounding an important issue, we need to hear all sides of an argument. This helps flush out the "what ifs" and the devil's advocate angle. As you point out, emotional intelligence will either be present or it won't depending on who is in the room. It's ok to be passionate about something to get your point across, but there is a line that can be crossed, don't cross it. Respecting opposing views while not agreeing is acceptable.

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    Paul Gronholz

    I thought that this module was a great reminder of how important it is for leaders to be great communicators. A lack of effective communication is consistently ranked as one of the biggest issues among organizations. One of the best ways to create cohesive and successful teams and organizations is the ability to effectively communicate. It is essential that leaders communicate as much as possible. I appreciated the first part of the module with the John O'Leary ted talk. It was interesting to learn about the failure of President Kennedy and what he did to learn from his mistakes. Having a dissenting opinion and effectively communicating that does not mean you're being disloyal to the organization. Criticism of an idea does not mean you're criticizing the individual and disagreeing with the consensus does not necessarily mean you're not a team player.

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    Samantha Reps

    "A leader of the past will know how to tell, a leader of the future will know how to ask." Such a simple sentence can make you reflect on how you communicate with your staff or how your supervisor communicates with you. When listening to Marshall Goldsmith talk about when asking for input don't use the words no, but or however, it made me self-reflect on if I do this or how often I do this and how it reflects on my staff.

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      This sentence resonated with me as well. I believe as leaders, we sometimes forget to listen to the leaders of the past. That experience is invaluable and can greatly aid us in being effective communicators.

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    One aspect of this Module I thoroughly enjoyed and found relatable was "stubbornness and opinionated" are two key characteristics to most highly successful people. It seems ironic that the two characteristics which propel individuals to high level of success are two key characteristics that need to assessed and evolved. The key to this evolution of thought and approach lies solely within the ability to communicate effective. Such a simple process is the gateway to overall success.

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    Kelly Lee

    Right away this module starts out by saying that us wearing our uniforms is a form of communication. I think that is something very important to keep in mind during our work. Too often we forget about the "non-verbal" form of communication which is this sense would be us simply showing up in uniform. Immediately when people see us in uniform they begin to form an opinion of that person of how the interaction is going to go. If we get out of our squads and walk briskly somewhere "or with a purpose" vs. walking normal those around us start to gather an idea of what is about to happen.....all this by NON-verbal communication. Back on track a little more with this module it is clear throughout almost every module that ineffective communication is highly detrimental to any organization and effective communication can be very rewarding, build trust and empower those within to do more.

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      Bou Gazley

      This is so true. Just they way that you arrive and present yourself can say a lot about you. We have all worked those officers who get pour gas on the fire just by arriving on the scene or those who when they arrive, everyone is able to take a deep breath and relax. The uniform is part of the use of force continuum for a reason. The first step is officer presence, even before a word is said. The uniform is a form of communication and most people respect the uniform and it changes their behaviors, but as we all know too well, the uniform does not garner as much respect currently due to many issues in our society.

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      Sergeant Michael Prachel

      I liked how it started the lecture - an officer in uniform, by itself, can impact how communication may go. A great reminder for everyone to look and act professional.

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      Timothy Sandlin

      Good point about the non-verbal communication. We often overlook the non-verbal communication and the importance of it in influencing outcomes. The power of perceptions from the beginning is greatly influenced by some of the non-verbal communication that is going on in the situation. I think many times this sets the tone for the interaction whatever it may be and can impact the outcome.

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    Bou Gazley

    Communication is very important as a leader and it is important to know how to communicate. Leaders need to allow others on the team to not agree with what is being said and feel comfortable enough to say something. In the TED talk, this was made clear in the two example he gave about the Bay of Pigs and the shuttle launch. Sometimes leaders can get so caught up in what they want to do, they are not able to take in all of the available information and it ends if a fiery crash. But those who are providing that information also needs to be able to share that knowledge without fear of recourse. Like was mentioned, it is important to not equate dissent with disloyalty. Being loyal means that you will step up and protect them team and/or leader when it is necessary.

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    The Challenger video highlighted a breakdown in communication and evidenced how it can be catastrophic. Transfering good and bad communication to the law enforcement world can be equally or potentially worse than the shuttle incident. For example, many things happen literally second by second in our profession. If a dispatcher holds the information too long on a high-risk call, this could completely alter the outcome. From a leadership/management angle, if we don't clearly relay information to our staff it could cause all kinds of issues as well.

    Plain and simple, we have to be effective communicators. Effective in the fact that our messaging almost always seems spot on. The receiver of information however may not get the proper intent of the message. Texting is one current example where messaging can get completely scrambled between two people. I see this all the time, I text something only to have the recipient go in the wrong direction or misinterpret what I was trying to relay. The best communication is face to face or at minimum voice to voice. This offers such things as tone, clarification, rebuttal, and so forth. Things are way less likely to be misinterpreted in this form of communication. If communication needs to be in writing, I always have a proofreader go over my work before I push send or print. Sometimes I even have two proofreaders.

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    Gregory Hutchins

    An interesting take away is leadership communication requires eliminating words that stymie positive interactions with our personnel. The “no, but, however,” terms are highly limiting and destructive to a leader's ability to have an open conversation with personnel. To hear of the example of the fines to a leader for using the word “but” shows how easily we create the bad habit of promoting negative influencing words. This lesson carries a close similarity to a positive psychology course that I was fortunate to attend to see where the use of “T” words (don't, can't, not, etc.) does the same thing. We found that by eliminating these words and replacing them with “yes and,” one is forced to remain supportive yet offer an opinion to facilitate support and open dialogue. This simple process makes it very difficult to be dismissive and not open to truly listening to the views and ideas of the group.

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    The importance of effective leadership can never be stressed enough. There are so many pieces that involve being effective and they must all be used to be successful. I think one of the most challenging for me and probably a lot of people, is being able to take that step back and listen to someone without already thinking about a response to what that person will say. A lot of details may be missed if the person on the listening end really isn't listening and is more worried about being right and making their point. It may be easier to see this occurring if observing two other people having a conversation, but it's something all of us should focus on more.

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      Sgt. Shawn Wilson

      I agree; the ability to aggressively listen to your people assists in removing preconceived notions and creates better buy in from you people. Details are missed, the intent is missed if we fail to aggressively listen.

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      Ronald Smith

      Kari
      I find myself in conversations with my peers and chiefs all the time. I can finish their sentences and thoughts and I can answer them before they realize they were interrupted. So yes I have to ensure I actively listen, I slow down in order to process what they are saying or want to be done.

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        Marshall Carmouche

        Ronald, I used to find myself in a constant struggle with wanting to interrupt people when they're speaking. I have disciplined myself to listen to them completely then replying to them.

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    Well, that was shorter than I anticipated. Especially for such a crucial part of leadership. Although keeping it simple and to the point can be just as effective as long and hashed out topic. Every leadership class I've been to, at a minimum, touched on the importance of communication and its influence on the success of a leader. For me, listening and nonverbal communication are two things I have to be extremely mindful of when talking to people. Too often I find myself thinking of a response before the other party has finished talking and inadvertently miss part of the conversation. In the midst of that, at times, I can tend to have a physical reaction that may impact the destination of the conversation...steering it from where the other person originally wanted to go, to something they think I may want to hear.

    The most important part of the module though, was the reminder of credibility and how critical it is to leadership. Verbal and nonverbal communication's impact on the trust felt by others. As well as how you act, speak and listen will impact others perception of reputation.

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      Sergeant Michael Prachel

      I agree Nathan. Communication is the foundation of everything we do and this was summed up pretty fast; however, great points made. Like you mentioned, credibility is crucial when it comes to establishing communication. Why would someone give you the time of day if you don’t know what you are talking about? I am sure we’ve all had instructors at one point that seem disengaged from the topic. Perhaps they don’t enjoy teaching that topic as much as other topics, or they just aren’t as knowledgeable in that course. Either way, credibility is a key foundation to communication.

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    The lecture stressed credibility as a key to communication in leadership. Basically, people are not as likely to follow somebody who doesn't know what they are doing or that they cant trust. The trust part is easy. Put the people you lead first and yourself second. Eventually you will earn their trust or, at least, their respect.

    As leaders get higher up in an organization, it gets harder to stay knowledgeable in all facets of the job. Keeping abreast of what your people do at all levels is tough. It requires spending extra time to keep that working knowledge, but this is key if an upper level leader wants to retain credibility. I remember being about 2 yrs into policing when I had an "old school" captain work a beat with me on night shift. I was impressed that he took the time to get back to basics. I was even more impressed that he wanted to spend time with the new guys.

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      Jed,
      With the last year or so our chief deputy retired from our agency. Even though he was never required to work the road he sometimes did when his schedule allowed. He wouldn't just pick up the day shifts he literally would work the overnights to make contact with the frontline deputies. His expertise, dynaism, and trust that he had with his co-workers has yet been matched by anyone in our agency. This is something as a new administrator I am striving for. He was an effective communicator, listener, and respected leader through out the ranks. I often hear my coworkers, some subordinate to me as well as my peers state that, "he was the backbone of our agency". He set the bar very high prior to his retirement.

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    There were very good points made from this lecture. Being a good leader is some one that can definitely communicate effectively and also have the ability to be a great listener. I think that effective communication plays a huge role in the success of an organization. Everyone has to know the plan for the future, and been given some buy in on the decisions that are being made.

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      Eric Sathers

      I completely agree. To get buy-in (which is crucial), you definitely need to learn and engage in effective communication.

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    Sgt. Shawn Wilson

    Credibility
    1) Expertise
    2) Dynamism
    3) Trust

    I enjoyed the short and to the point learning format applied during this module. In order to communicate effectively we must be credible with an understanding that misunderstandings are inherent within communication. The module reinforcing that misunderstandings are inherent caused me to reflect on my own communication to determine how and where I can become a better communicater when misunderstandings have been identified.

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      Travis Linskens

      I agree Shawn. We need to constantly evaluate ourselves as communicators and identify areas we can become better. There is always going to be misunderstandings but how we respond and learn from those misunderstanding defines our credibility for future interactions.

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    Sergeant Michael Prachel

    Intervention Options in the Wisconsin DAAT (Defense and Arrest Tactics) manual starts off with "Presence.” Just the officer’s presence, alone, may be enough to get compliance and control. This is much like communication, where the officer’s personal appearance may impact how well they are able to communicate. The lecture speaks about an officer in uniform, by itself, is a show of communication. This is something that needs to be addressed, as often times we see the “sloppy” appearance. Effective communication may mean starting with the basics, especially in a position like law enforcement when everyone is watching and we are under the microscope.

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      Matthew Menard

      I agree with you on professional appearance being vitally important. I watched a segment a few years ago where suspects arrested after killing law enforcement officers were interviewed about their crimes. Several of them cited that they sized up the officer before hand and decided that the officer did not look "prepared" and they felt they could take advantage of that. They referenced the officer's uniform not being pressed and them looking out of shape. In these instances their presence "communicated" that they could be taken advantage of.

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    Timothy Sandlin

    This module covered the role that effective communication plays in effective leadership. Many times issues and failures can be found to have occurred simply from failure of effective communication in the beginning. I have seen many scenarios play out where due to a variety of reasons communication failed. Some of those times it involved egos, arrogance or stubbornness on the part of some of the individuals in the conversation. It is important to develop the environment wherein people feel they can honestly contribute to the conversation about a situation or project without the fear of some type of negative repercussions. The flow of information, ideas, thoughts, suggestions, and input is vital to the success of any organization. The credibility of the leader is crucial in effective communication. That credibility is formed through demonstrating expertise, dynamism, and trust.

    In the initial video it outlined one statement that I have found incredibly true in my career. The quality of communication influences the quality of our decisions which then has an impact on the quality of our outcomes. This sums up the importance of communication and how it relates to success.

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    Travis Linskens

    I enjoyed this short and concise module. It highlights credibility, which I beleive is a cornerstone of being a successful law enforcement officer in every interaction we have, from public information distribution, interacting with coworkers to interviewing a suspect in a criminal matter. Without credibility (Expertise, Dynamism, and Trust) none of our interactions will produce the results we are looking for.

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    Travis Linskens

    I agree Shawn. We need to constantly evaluate ourselves as communicators and identify areas we can become better. There is always going to be misunderstandings but how we respond and learn from those misunderstanding defines our credibility for future interactions.

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    Major Willie Stewart

    Effective Communication is very important, especially when speaking to subordinates. If we as leaders are not getting our message through and understood then our job performance as well as the job performance of those under our command will suffer. To me, the most important aspect to credibility is expertise. For your subordinates to have trust in you, you must have expertise in your area. This is why it is so important to continue to try and improve yourself by staying up to date on information in your field and continuing with your education.

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      Expertise is a vital part of credibility. I would agree we should be continually striving for self-improvement. I have taught effective communication courses for about 10 years and still find myself lacking at communicating well in some instances! Therefore, I constantly figure out ways to improve. I also learn new ways to teach the course to make it even more meaningful. Despite the importance of this topic, I still get pushback on teaching this topic when tactical classes interfere with timing. Many focus solely on tactics, and in doing so, they forget the value of effective communication as a valuable tactic to use to either avoid or delay the need to use force. The need to constantly improve should be reflective in the training we provide by combining multiple disciplines into training programs and scenarios.

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    Ronald Smith

    MIlitary leadership classes all involve communication, college classes emphasize communication, and every law enforcement class I have attended believes communication is vital to our success. I don't know about you but I am starting to think we should catch on to this communication thing. The credibility portion was a good one I had never heard or seen the word Dynamism but I am going to find someplace to use it. Uncle Sam taught me the respect of my uniform and how its presentation was a reflection of the person wearing it but it was also a representation of the United States Navy. Competent communication from leaders makes decisions and life much easier.

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    Matthew Menard

    Communication is something we as humans do all day every day, whether it be verbally or nonverbally. This module brought up some important topics as it relates to us as leaders, specifically with regards to credibility. If a leader does not have credibility as they communicate their message, it either is lost or not received correctly.

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      Sgt. Samantha Koscher

      I agree Matthew. If a leader lacks credibility, their message may not be taken seriously or not received at all. Its important for leaders to establish that trust and enthusiasm with staff and build their credibility as a leader.

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        Paul Brignac III

        I have had the unfortunate experience of listening to unqualified instruction in the past. I found myself unable to put value on what was being said, because I knew the person was not qualified. No matter how well spoken, or how entertaining, I was unable to move past knowing they had very little experience on the topic. On the other hand, I have sat under very well qualified individuals that simply could not communicate well. These individuals possessed the knowledge, they just did not convey it well. Ideally, a good leader will possess the knowledge to be considered credible, but also be able to convey their message to others.

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    Marshall Carmouche

    This lesson reinforced the importance of communicating effectively. Effective communication must be open, honest and requires compromise. Effective communication requires us to talk and listen. Within my division, I have an open door policy for subordinates to talk to me at any time. This open line of communication and availability builds trust and shows that the employee is valued. The vast majority of the time, I do more listening than talking. When there is an employee with a problem or issue I want them to voice their concern to me. Most of the time, the employee only wants to talk and be heard. Communication can bring change. Change is not always bad. How we adapt to change says a lot about the type of leader we are.

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    Sgt. Samantha Koscher

    Competent communication is key for a leader to be successful. It is important to recognize the various steps in communication such as creating, sending, receiving, and interpreting a message and being mindful of how our messages are being received by others. Part of being a good communicator is being a good listener. Its important to listen and absorb all of the message, rather than bits and pieces.

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    Thomas Martin

    This course reminded me that "it’s not what you say, but how you say something." Many times a leader finds himself/herself receiving orders from a supervisor, who is upset about an situation developing. We can absorb and emulate these actions, or we can take time to compose ourselves before sending them to our subordinates. A leader will make conscious efforts to become rational before the strategy and execution of a plan. There is no need to "bark" orders to the ones you supervise, as it only creates the vision you are filled with incompetence.

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      Kaiana Knight

      I totally agree with you Thomas. Sometimes the way we say something can be interpreted the wrong way. Even through text messages or emails. Many times I received orders when my superior was upset and it made me doubt his credibility as a leader.

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      Scott Crawford

      People will only listen to barking orders so long. It`s my opinion that in today`s times, the way we communicate with others is much more vital than ever before. Sometimes it`s best if we use the 10 second rule before we speak. Right or wrong, I believe the way we deliver our words can have a negative effect on today`s generation of officers.

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        Stan Felts

        I totally agree with your post, and I am one of those people who has benefited greatly from the "10 second rule".

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      Derek Champagne

      I think we have all had the leader who barked orders because he/she was getting the orders barked at them. If these leaders had changed their delivery, the message would have been received differently, and they would have gotten the results they wanted. It is all in the delivery.

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    Paul Brignac III

    During this lecture on Effective Communication, Dr. Long mentioned "exchanging". I believe that one of the most critical elements to communicating effectively is to exchange, rather than just provide. When speaking to groups I typically make it a point to ask questions to the audience. It has been my experience that the interaction helps retain their attention. I have found that talking with a group, is better received that talking to a group.

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    Eric Sathers

    I strongly believe in communication as the foundation of leadership. My organization hasn’t always been effective at communication, which has at times led to conflict, rumors, and misunderstandings. There are of course times when information must remain confidential; however whenever possible supervisors should clearly communicate to their staff. This can be as simple as providing regular(and valuable) feedback to employees so everyone knows if they are doing what is expected of them.

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      Zach Roberts

      Eric,
      I could not agree with you more. Effective communication is in my opinion as well, the foundation of effective leadership. Not having effective communication can lead to conflict, rumors and major misunderstandings that result in loss of jobs, arguments and sometimes a career change.

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      Kevin Balser

      Eric - my organization several years ago was notorious for not disseminating information. That in itself was very detrimental to the department and to the morale. The information was only being shared with key members of the organization but was not being filtered down. That eventually changed and I observed many colleagues begin to get more involved in the department and their attitudes changed for the better.

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    I was not completely sold on his definition of dynamism. I’m not sure how his example of shined shoes leads to a dynamic person. I don’t shine my shoes each day. Usually, it’s because every time I shine my shoes, I end up in a foot chase, a field, a dirt lot, or some other area that leads to dirty shoes. So, by his example, I’m not dynamic? Do my dirty shoes on the heels of the search of a field for evidence of a crime decrease my credibility? Also, dynamism, in many that I experience, comes across as egotistical. That leads to a decrease in credibility, in my opinion. I think the point is a credible person should have the ability to take charge (even quietly) and follow-through, but I just did not buy his explanation.

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      Jared Paul

      Brian,

      I have seen you with dirty boots and I do not find you any less credible! I do agree that dirty shoes does not decrease credibility. I'm sure that there are some people that look at an officers boots and see them really shiny and give that officer more credibility, but I sure wouldn't. I would view that officer as professional and prepared. I think there are many other ways I find important to gain credibility among your officers.

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      Robert Vinson

      Brian I think that's a great counter argument. I understand the point he was making, but sweeping generalizations like that aren't always the best approach.

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    Jared Paul

    Communication is a very important aspect in leadership. I feel that leaders need to be effective communicators and be able to address not just the staff at the department but as well as the public. I through a leadership course a few years ago and they covered communication. One of the things that stuck with me was non-verbal communication, specifically email. Email is a huge part of our daily activity so they stressed the importance of demonstrating strong communication skills via email. This is form of communication that gives us the ability to share information quickly and appropriately. A trick they taught in the course that I have found very useful in communicating via email is write shorter emails. I have found it very beneficial to keep my emails short and direct to the point. I think my superiors appreciate it too.

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      Kenneth Davis

      Hey Jared- Although I use e-mail incessantly, I like the personal approach. Effective communication, especially when there is no line of sight and body language to interpret, can be cumbersome, to be sure. I often wonder how we can improve communication venues that are set up to save time but are perhaps less efficiently than face to face discussions.

      Kenny

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    Kenneth Davis

    Dr. Long (2021) speaks of credibility and makes several salient points in linking this with communication. While he posits the importance of credibility in creating a foundation and being the key to leadership, he goes on to link elements or dimensions of credibility in communication. A point that really resonated was how the lecture couched these elements. As leaders, it is clear that expertise in our day to day interactions is important. What seems sage is the caveat that explains that expertise is not confined to technical skills of the job. It also encompasses the importance of expertise in people. Being able to read communicative clues such as facial expressions, body language and interpreting returned feedback are important skills in assuring communication is effective, clear and concise.

    An additional key point was the discussion of dynamism. Perceptions of an individual that are positive lend to their inherent credibility while negative perceptions tear it away. Right or wrong, that is the reality that leaders work within every day. It is not that a leader who dresses sloppily or does not shine his shoes is not a very credible and engaged leader, but that may be the perception afforded him by his appearance. It is a stereotype, and although it is unfair, it is a reality that we have to work in. Hence, leaders must be proactive and pick up on how folks will perceive their behavior and appearance. The neat leader who is attuned to their grooming and dress will fare better that those who choose to skate. Leaders do not have to look like models,. but they must be attired professionally. It is a model of respect for one's self as well as peers and team mates.

    The key element of trust is built around many facets of an individual. Competency, appearance, consistency and clear communication are at the forefront of trust-building. Transparency is another element of importance when building trust. At the end of the day, leaders are built with series of bricks and not a single block of concrete. Effective communication is the mortar that holds all of this together.

    References

    Long, L. (2021). Effective communication. Module #7, week #3. National Command and Staff College.

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    Robert Vinson

    I think a good line of communication goes a long way toward improving morale and preventing rumors and misinformation. I've worked for some other organizations where information was hoarded simply as a measure of control, and I've seen how this can be detrimental to unit cohesion. Of course there may be a time that sensitive information can not be communicated, but I think keeping everyone as informed as possible as often as possible helps keep everyone on the team moving in the right direction with the right attitude.

    • Edit

      I agree whole heartily. Rumors can quickly kill moral within a department and one of the fastest ways to discourage and reduce them is by effectively communicating. It's hard to spread rumors, which may be detrimental to moral, if everyone perceives your communication as credible. I also think it's important to keep the lines open and following as you said, it can't be one and done. If the rumors are still there, the communication was ineffective.

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    Steve Mahoney

    This module while short was very eye opening. I liked how he described the 3 myths of effective communication.
    Dissent= disloyalty
    criticism of idea = criticism of person
    disagree with consensus = not a team player
    I think all of of fallen into this trap where either we didn't speak up or be honest to give a overall evaluation of a situation or have been the person in charge where if someone did one of these things we equated tit to a negative. I believe that we need to realize that people are trying to do the right things and give all options and we or a person of higher rank shouldn't take it personally

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    Kaiana Knight

    This lesson really explained the importance of communicating with your team. As a leader you influence others so you must be good at listening and communicating. I also agree that a leader must be credible in order to be effective. When any of my coworkers come to me with a question or suggestion I stop what I'm doing, and give them my attention. I listen to them and at the end if they ask me what my thoughts are, I share them. I also think that when you have been working with the same people you begin to know and learn their habits, and you know when something is bothering them. At times, I'll ask them if they need to talk about an assignment or if they need help with completing a task. As a leader in my department I always ask my team for input. Many times the input benefit our department. I also encourage my team to be better and do better at something that they do repetitive.

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      Bradley Treuil

      I agree that a leader must be credible. They must be able to be trusted by the community as well as the persons that he or she supervises. When speaking to members of my team I also Make sure that I stop and give my full undivided attention to them. I Try to guide them to the answer they are looking for rather than just giving them the answer. I could do a lot better job at learning the persons I work with. I try to be there if they need anything on or off duty but I do lack at getting to know them away from work

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    Zach Roberts

    This module really expressed the importance of effectively communicating. As a leader in law enforcement communication is key. You need to be able to communicate the things you are trying to put in place as well as policies or directives you have in place. It is extremely important for your staff t know that when they speak to you, they have your undivided attention. This could be in regards to a case, changes they may feel are beneficial or an issue they may be having whether personal or work related. Overall, an open good line of communication goes along way with those you are leading. Showing you care and accept their criticism and concerns really earns respect.

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    Scott Crawford

    This lecture once again made me question my communication skills Being an effective communicator is vital in your role as a leader. Being a good listener is as important. I`ve had leaders that can give you about 30 seconds of their time. If you can`t get it in then you`ve lost them. Start giving people your undivided attention, they will gravitate to you and seek out your knowledge.

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      Ronald Springer

      Scott,
      I can completely relate to the supervisor is too busy if you can get their attention. It was this type of supervisor that irked my nerves and made it feel like they were unavailable. I still remember how that made me feel as a new person and strive to never make any of my team members to ever have that feeling from me.

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    The module again stressed the importance of communication which I think is noteworthy as it so important in our jobs and also as being a leader. The break down of credibility was interesting to be me specifically the part of dynamism. I wasn't sure what that meant at first, but it was clear after the module. It's clear that someone who is unmotivated or lacks the vigor of dynamism will not be seen as a credible leader or communicator. It's important to communicate and also walk the walk as they say. Once you do this, it will enhance your communications with other as you will become more credible and thus, able to influence others with greater effectiveness.

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    Chris Crawford

    This highlighted many aspects of my hostage /crisis training and times I have had to use it. One of the hardest things for me to do was to learn to control my wanting to immediately talk in hopes that I could help defuse the situation. I still struggle with it but am improving.

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    Derek Champagne

    As a leader, to be effective, you have to be able to communicate. As a young officer, I know when I would speak to someone of rank, and they began to play on their phone or computer, I would feel like I was bothering them and often end the conversation. When I speak to subordinates, I make it a point to turn away from the computer and leave the phone on the desk to ensure that they have my full attention. This has opened the door for them to come to me more and seek out my advice and opinions.

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      Buck Wilkins

      I know that I have made the same mistake by looking at my phone when someone was speaking to me and as a 27 year veteran with my department I should know better. Sometimes I do it and not realize that it's happening.

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        Jay Callaghan

        Buck, I know we are all guilty of that...life was easier before smartphones...

        Jay Callaghan
        Session #013

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      Donald Vigil

      Well said, Derek. I have been guilty of the things that you mentioned. Once I became aware of it (mostly from being annoyed by my superiors doing it to me) I forced myself to put all other things aside and give my undivided attention to the individual. I found that this goes a long way in building relationships and trust.

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    Buck Wilkins

    One of the important things stood out to me in this lecture was one of the biggest mistakes when asking someone for input is to begin the sentence with No, But, or However. I know that I have heard people begin sentences with one of those three words and I am pretty sure that I have made the same mistake and just didn't realize it. I can see where it would make them question your ability as a leader.

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      Burt Hazeltine

      I am quick to start a sentence with those words. Never really thought about the impact of consistently starting sentences with a negative tone. You are basically shutting them down as soon as you start. We, as leaders, need our people to know that we are actually open to the input we just asked for.

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    Bradley Treuil

    I enjoyed this lecture. As a leader we have to be able to communicate effectively. We have to be able to express ourselves in ways that many people are able to understand because we don't lead robots. We have to be able to express our thoughts and goals to persons in our profession as well as to ordinary persons in the communities we served. Being able to effectively communicate builds trust and faith with the persons that one leads.

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    Brent Olson

    One of the things our management team at the department has been working on the past few years is building relationships. We hold high the ability to build relationships with those in the community to work together to accomplish our organizational goals and objectives. At the center of relationship building is communication. If you can't communicate, you can't build relationships. If you can't communicate, you can't build credibility in the relationship. When the lesson reviewed the (3) key components of credibility, trust was really something that caused me to think. Not only do we as leaders have the obligation to build relationships and communicate effectively, we must absolutely do so in a way that builds trust. For a relationship to work, the others involved must trust that your word is true and you will follow through with what you said you would.

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    Jay Callaghan

    I am sure many of us have worked for or with an officer or supervisor that either escalates a situation which we have diffused or the supervisor that is a challenge to communicate with on a daily basis. In my current role at CSU, there are some unique challenges networking with stakeholders on campus. We are not immune to some of our external partners buying into the national rhetoric towards law enforcement. I have found that it has been beneficial taking that "tactical pause" and listening more, responding less. At the present this will benefit us long term in restoring relationships across campus.

    Jay Callaghan
    Session #013

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      Jeff Byrne

      Very well said, Jay. I live in a very law enforcement supportive community, but we too have stakeholders in our community who let the national tone drive their thinking and conversations. We must listen to their thoughts and opinions and hope that even though we may see things differently that it can bring all of us together in the long term.

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    Ronald Springer

    Effective communication is a struggling point for myself as a leader. Effective listening is a lost art and is one of the biggest downfalls of so many of the people I interact with on the daily basis. Communication is one of the biggest downfalls of our organization because so much is delivered via email. Which makes it less effective, however to combat this we hold roll calls daily so we can verbally communicate the information to our shifts so we can ensure we are keeping our teams informed. But on the regular basis I have tried to explain a situation and been asked a question that I answered earlier in the conversation. This is usually an indication that they are not actively listening and only reacting to preconceived notions they had. This is why I try to be clearer in my verbal communications and ask if I need to clarify what I say and ask open ended questions to ensure they understand and comprehend what I am trying to communicate.

    Long, L. (2017). Effective Communication. Module 7, Week 1. National Command and Staff College.

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      Andrew Peyton

      Springer,

      I must agree that the personal relationship and interaction is lost due to email and technology advances. In the past, the messages would have to be delivered in person and allowed for everyone to interact personally. Now we simply press a button to ask a question.

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    Burt Hazeltine

    Most of the time when I think of effective communication I think about how I delivered the message. How I presented the material. I don't often think about how credible I am when delivering the message. As I watched this presentation I actually remember an instance where the lack of credibility of an instructor was the driving force for me becoming an instructor myself. We need to make sure we maintain credibility with our officers. I need to work on becoming more dynamic. Certain subjects get energy and passion but many just get my words. I need to find ways to become more enthusiastic when relaying information that may not really make me excited.

    • Edit

      Burt I totally agree and feel we are all guilty in a sense; when it comes to putting more energy into something we enjoy. I find myself as well putting more energy and time into something I enjoy; not taking into consideration my delivery and the message I'm conveying. Credibility is a major component in our profession. How can we lead if individuals do not have faith in us. How can individuals follow if they don't trust. We have to realize our words have more meaning and power than we believe.

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      Chris Fontenot

      Agreed, I think we can have the expertise on material but with a lack luster Dynamism the trust might not follow along.

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    Andrew Peyton

    Although our delivery and message is one of the main components to effective communication, I feel effective listening is just as important and is a concept that is often time not used. Yes, how we deliver our message and the credibility we establish with those under our command is important, but listening to their ideas and concerns is just as important. Listening to others and building our relationships with them only strengthens our communication skills.

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      Darryl Richardson

      Andrew, I completely agree that listening to the ideas and concerns of personnel under our command is very important. By listening to them you gain their trust, which in turn will make them want to follow you.

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    The module was short but to the point. I feel it touched on a couple of important characteristics leaders should possess. Dr. Larry Long stated "Leaders need to be competent communicators in order to enhance credibility, communicate expectations, and share information." Communication is central to everything that happens in the workplace. Dr. Long also mentioned, leaders must be great listeners. As leaders we cannot be distracted by our surroundings.

    As mentioned by Marshall Goldsmith, leaders ask for input; learn from everyone around you. As leaders we must listen to individuals around us; allow their input. By doing so it helps them feel like they're part of a team. In turn it helps us to become better leaders. We have to remember they are our eyes and ears. We cannot be everywhere at once; a good leader has a great team.

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    Kevin Balser

    Effective communication is certainly a powerful tool in our arsenal as leaders. I have definitely become more of a listener than a talker over the past several years. I have learned to really listen intently and process the information that is being presented without rushing to judgement. I do not attempt to cut someone short in the conversation even thought the urge can be great at times. We have to keep our team engaged at all times making them feel a part of the decision making process. That will lead to success within the organization.

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      Jose Alvarenga

      I am good at listening and communicating well with others. However, I must admit I sometimes catch myself cutting someone short during a conversation. This is definitely a discipline I must master.

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    Darryl Richardson

    In order to be a great and effective leader you must have effective communication. Effective communication is not only just talking but it is effectively listening too. Communication is so important in our profession. Without effective communication, tasks will not be completed according to policy. As a supervisor in the jail it is imperative that I have effective communication with my personnel.

    Sometimes administration sends out emails to personnel and people do not even look at their emails. At the beginning of each shift we conduct roll call with our personnel. During this time, I make sure I go over any emails that had been sent out from Administration to make sure my personnel are up to date on any policies that have changed. I also stress to my personnel that communication is key to the shift running smoothly.

    I know that I need to improve on my effective listening, if I want to improve as a leader.

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    Chris Fontenot

    Start no sentence with no, but, or, however. Great point as it relates to mindset and perception. From this lesson I will take away effective communication is not only verbal but also non-verbal. I have been told before that without saying a word my emotions give off communication signals that often people misinterpret. After taking a breath or time to think in the perspective of others, my outlook may change. It will be my responsibility to assure that my nonverbal communication is interpreted better.

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      David Mascaro

      I worked for a commander who could communicate a lot without saying a word. His face would definitely show his displeasure with you or something you said or did. It would also let you know when it was time to stop talking and listen. Although non-verbal, it was still very very effective.

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    Jose Alvarenga

    The lesson in this module is that to be an effective leader; you must effectively communicate. So often, when I talk about communication, I think only of verbal communication. However, it is also essential to realize that nonverbal communication plays a critical role in your effectiveness as a leader.

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      Jerrod Sheffield

      Jose,
      I agree that communication is key. People do tend to think verbal when the term communication is brought to light. However, non-verbal is just as important if not more and definitely can affect you as a leader.

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    David Mascaro

    Effective communication is crucial in the law enforcement field. Effectively and efficiently getting your message, thoughts or request out to your personnel is essential. I prefer verbal communication and face to face if at all possible, that way I can read their non-verbal cues as well to ensure the message was properly received. That also gives them the opportunity to do the same when they are sharing information with me because it is equally important that i fully receive and comprehend what they are communicating. I also believe in starting a briefing with reminding everyone to hold all questions until the end, because I may cover that question later in the briefing and it will also help prevent from getting off task and leaving a crucial element out.

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    Donald Vigil

    I was surprised on how short this module was but received some valuable information from it. I especially liked the Ted Talk by John O'Leary. I can relate with what he calls the 3 myths- Dissent=Disloyalty, Criticism of an idea=criticism of an individual and Disagree with consensus=not a team player. These have been a major factor in our supervisor meetings in the past but thankfully have gotten better. Effective communication can only be truly accomplished when they are viewed as myths and not as reality.

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      Trent Johnson

      Highlighting those three myths was priceless. I have never viewed those myths as true when dealing with the team I lead, but when I am in with my peers and out bosses, I feel that way. I'll have to get past those if I am going to effectively communicate upward. And reiterate to my team that those are myths and that they need to feel free to disagree, dissent or not be in consensus if they have evidence they should do otherwise.

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    Shawn Winchester

    I found myself to ask a person for their input then I start my conversation I understand what you are saying but, no, or however. I see now how that makes a person shut down and don't want to give you input anymore.

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    Trent Johnson

    Dr. Long's session was good, although short. In this module I received more from the John O'Leary TED Talk and Marshall Goldsmith's brief interlude. O'Leary's 3 myths , independent deliberation and devil's advocate techniques were priceless to me. Those will become cornerstones for collaborative efforts from here on out with my team. Marshall Goldsmith's bit on No, But and However brought to light just how many times I use those phrases. And here I thought I was an effective communicator. I've got work to do.

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      Joey Brown

      Trent I agree. It is important as a leader to stop and take a breath before making a statement. After reviewing the lecture I will definitely be more aware of how I begin my conversations.

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    Joey Brown

    From my experience, effective communication is vital to the organizations success in many ways. When this concept is implemented the leader will build credibility within the team that is being supervised. The lecturer gave three effective components of credibility that include expertise, dynamism, and trust. These three notions will assist the leader and the team to avoid misunderstandings. The leader having the ability to be a good listener and have quality conversations with the team during the decision making process is very important. These two skills will help guide the information flow that takes place inside the team. This will allow the leader and everyone on the team to have a same shared outcome.

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    Jeff Byrne

    While short, which surprised me, I found this module and John O'Leary's TED Talk very interesting. In the Marshall Goldsmith video he began with a quote by Peter Drucker which stated, "Leaders of the past knew how to tell, leaders of the future know how to ask." As leaders we must recognize there will be so much more success if we ask for input from our staff and listen and learn from them. It creates the opportunity for them to get buy-in to decisions or a direction we are heading.

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    John Simonson

    Effective communication is a powerful tool in all areas of life, but especially in leadership. I know when I was a new sergeant many years ago I tended to yell and get angry. I was not a skilled communicator. I liked when Dr. Long talked about learning how to manage interpersonal conflict and how important it is to learn how to become argumentative competent rather than using verbal aggression to deal with the conflict. It takes a lot of hard work, but learning how to effectively communicate can help not only the team you work with but it will also help you out when it comes to leading others.

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      Glenn Hartenstein

      I totally agree with you John. I had similar experiences as a supervisor in controlling my verbal aggression to deal with someone who challenged me. Overtime, I've learned over time to become argumentative competent because it really helped me in dealing with conflict and challenges to being a leader.

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    Glenn Hartenstein

    The one thing that really stood out to me in this short lecture on "Effective communication", is the importance of credibility. Dr. Larry Long described the three components of credibility as expertise, dynamism, and trust. I agree with his statement that trust is the most important of the three components. In order to get your officers to accept your leadership, trust in you is vitally important. This was short but effective module in the importance of communication in leadership.

    • Edit

      I fully understand what you are saying Glenn. Trust is the most important component of credibility. Especially in our profession, if the supervisors/officers do not have credibility, the citizens and employees will not accept their leadership.

  • Edit

    In my opinion, being an effective communicator is paramount to the success of any leader. This module just pointed out the high points but I totally agree with Dr. Larry Long. Credibility is the most important value for a leader to effectively communicate to his subordinates, peers and superiors. I also really liked John O'Leary's lecture on the importance of good conversation. I learned some techniques on how to ensure your employees are telling you how they feel, not just agreeing with you. I particularly like the devil's advocate technique. I have used that technique in the past and it works well.

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    Andrew Ashton

    Being credible is important as is being an honest communicator. Trust is indeed the most important as your people must feel that they can trust what you say in order to be able to communicate it further down the chain. It all ties back to your credibility in your position and within your respective command. Controlling your verbal aggression is also important as it will help to keep and atmosphere of open communication with your people not leaving them feeling stifled or judged.

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    Andrew Ashton

    I agree with Joey in that a good communicator must think before communicating. You must be sure to get the right message across and sometimes that means slowing it down and really calming ones self.

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      Curtis Summerlin

      I could not agree more. I really have to plan out some of my speech so that I get the right message across to my team. Being somewhat of an introvert hasn’t helped in this area but with continued effort I feel I am making an improvement

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    Tyler Thomas

    In order to be an effective communicator you have to build trust with who you work with. If you build that trust, you will be able to have effective conversations where other people know they can voice their opinion or their thought process without it becoming an argument. Since my promotion, i have had to learn how to effectively communicate the goals I want my supervisors to achieve. Andrew Ashton is right, sometimes you have to slow down and remain calm for the message to be clear.

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    Tyler Thomas

    In order to be an effective communicator you have to build trust with who you work with. If you build that trust, you will be able to have effective conversations where other people know they can voice their opinion or their thought process without it becoming an argument. Since my promotion, i have had to learn how to effectively communicate the goals I want my supervisors to achieve.

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      Hinton

      Credibility is the key! Without trust open communication is absent and you fall into the "Three Myths". Putting egos aside and concentrating on a goal and all the dynamics that go with it is fundamental to a successful communication.

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    Curtis Summerlin

    Effective communication has always been an issue for me. Being an introvert by nature has hindered my development in this area. I learned from the Marine Corps to be brief and usually blunt in my communication efforts. Unfortunately, this hasn’t helped especially when talking with my superiors. I continue to place emphasis on refining my style of delivery.
    When dealing with subordinates, I am working to ensure that I engage in active listening so I fully understand what they have to say. I feel active listening has helped develop more trust with my team mates. I’m working on being more articulate to ensure I reach all members of my team so they understand my intended message

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    Jerrod Sheffield

    This module speaks truth as it relates to the way we should communicate better and how to achieve that. The hardest thing for me sometimes is to listen to what others are saying and to comprehend the material being presented and give feedback in a positive manner. Sometimes we tend to overlook the opinions of others because we think our idea may be better or it is the way it has always been done, when in fact, we should be open to new suggestions and ideas for how to proceed with something.

    In Law Enforcement, we have the tendency to withdraw the idea of change when, in order to succeed, change may be necessary. Communication whether verbal or non-verbal should be done in a clear manner so that all participants have equal weight in the process of determining which direction to move in. This communication is key to the overall success of the subject matter being discussed and must include not only creating the idea but to also interpret it, present it and get feedback from the person receiving the information.

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      Hinton

      I agree, this is terribly difficult not to start your response with no, but or however. I often find myself formulating an answer in my head before I have heard the entire communication. I have been aware of this short-fall but now I feel I have some positive direction on how to begin to overcome it. To just start with a deep breath and focus on what is being said, rather then having a second conversation in your head, is a great starting point to competent communication!

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    Hinton

    John O'Leory stated, "Quality of conversation influences the quality of decisions and quality of decisions dictates the qualities of our outcomes." This statement summarizes how important it is to be competent in our communication and promoting competent communication. When the discussion of independent deliberation was discussed as a way to overcome the reasons why people remain silent, I could not help but think I have been communicating wrong. In the case of making corrections, I have always used a team approach but I never thought of doing individual deliberation. I plan to incorporate this immediately. I think a more rounded decision will come out of a process that has independent thought brought to a group for discussion and a final group resolution. The leadership team becomes more united and the affected individual has a response that is thoughtfully considered from many view points. A win-win process.

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      Kelly Lee

      Agree Hinton that one of most powerful statements of the module is from John O'Leary when he said, "Quality of conversation influences the quality of decisions and quality of decisions dictates the qualities of our outcomes."

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    Kelly Lee

    There are multiple different factors that can hamper the ability to effectively communicate as public safety professionals. Perspective from the law enforcement officer versus subjects being addressed can many times differ and in a way that causes more conflict than progress towards a resolution. One party’s solution to a problem may not align with the other party’s or the thought process to get to a solution is also different. This difference in perspective can stem from stereotyping or past experiences and can lead to a predetermined mindset of the law enforcement officer or the subject about the law enforcement officer before communication has even taken place. Hostility can arise based on past experiences or recent experiences that have left an impression that creates a negative mindset towards a person, group of people, situation, etc. This hostility can arise from either the law enforcement officer or the subject being addressed by the law enforcement officer. It can be difficult for the officer to respond and do their best to resolve a situation when the parties being helped or addressed are not willing to cooperate with law enforcement due to personal hostilities they may have. This can hamper effective communication as the law enforcement officer too as their mind may already be in a place of frustration, annoyance, or anger before even reaching and assessing the situation at hand. Feelings can alter thinking which then in turn can hamper effective communication as the law enforcement officer is not in the correct headspace to effectively communicate to resolve a situation. Personal feelings can take over and create a mindset or perspective that is not fair to the subjects being addressed as there was a prior presumption or expectation of the situation at hand. These are just a few of the many factors that can negatively impact effective communication of law enforcement officers between themselves and the public.