Command and Staff Program

ACE Track

Deep Change and Positive Emotional Intelligence

Replies
201
Voices
102
Dr. Mitch Javidi
Instructions:  
  1. Post a new discussion related to the topics covered in this module.  Your post needs to provide specific lessons learned with examples from this module helping you enhance your leadership capacity at work.
  2. After posting your discussion, review posts provided by other students in the class and reply to at least one of them. 
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    Monte Potier

    What I found most interesting was the portion explaining the differences between incremental change and deep change. I can totally understand the "fear" being a big part of why leaders are worried about making deep change. The concern of "what will this cost me if it goes wrong" is something that everyone thinks about prior to making a "deep change". Once we are confident in ourselves this "fear" should go away so deep change can be implemented.

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      Frank Acuna

      Monte,

      Fear of making deep change is a reality, one which I can relate to. Deep Change can have a high cost and you can suffer personal losses, which seem significant at the time. But, in the end, wind up being necessary and appropriate for the overall good of the change.

      Frank

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      Joey Prevost

      We as humans like to be comfortable. Change causes discomfort. Deep change can be threatening due to your whole world changing with no chance of going back. We have to be able to start with personal change in ourselves.

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        Jason Porter

        Comfortable is nice. Change can be good when everyone finally gets on board with it. The fear of not being able to return to what you knew prior to the change causes some apprehension.

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        Laurie Mecum

        I agree, change makes people uncomfortable. Especially when they don't understand it or there is no turning back. Change can be a good thing too...staying the same means not going anywhere.

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        chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

        I agree with your response, for some people change can definitely be something so demanding for an organization. People view change as in learning new people and new rules. we just have to maintain a positive attitude.

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        Joey,
        Making any change can be unnerving, but making Deep change can be down right terrifying. But by not making change a person or organization becomes stagnet, and would start to fail at some point.

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      Jarod Primicerio

      This portion was also the most interesting and relevant with what I am experiencing in my agency. All good for only incremental change that makes very little waves. If you even try to make monumental changes, stand-by...as it is next to impossible.

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      Nancy Franklin

      Monte, I agree that fear plays a big role in resistance to deep change. Cost is always a factor - whether is monetary or just risk. Leaders must have confidence in their own abilities and level of influence to feel comfortable initiating deep change.

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      Eduardo Palomares

      Hello Monte. I also found interesting the differences between incremental and deep change. I actually experienced this when l first got promoted as l came from another facility and had worked for another police agency. I had experience fear with both incremental and deep change even though the changes l was implementing would yield positive results. It took sometime for me to gain more confidence in implementing bigger organizational and individual changes.

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      I really liked this post. I 100% agree that incremental change is very scary for a lot of people. They want to do what is right and most believe they are making the change for the right reasons. However, having the fear or feeling uneasy if something were to go wrong can make leaders change their mind. That feeling may never completely go away, but I do agree that with a little more experience it will build confidence and hopefully make those decisions about changing something easier.

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    Frank Acuna

    Deep change is not easy to implement. Incremental change is a series of small changes, which can be reverted if they are seen as ineffective, or cause too much strife. Deep change requires you to dig deep, muster courage, identify deep-rooted issues and implement changes to overcome. Likewise, once we implement deep change, we must work to overcome our personal saboteurs. These saboteurs can be barriers for lasting deep change as they cause us to act in ways that sabotage our efforts and progress.

    Frank

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      Magda Fernandez

      Frank, i agree deep change is not easy to implement. It is harder when there is no buy in from your employees. As someone else stated cops are very resistant to change. As leaders and in this new era of policing i think we are going to find ourselves exploring deep changes for our organizations. It is incumbent on the organizational leaders to ensure the employees are well informed about even possible changes to get them on board and over come the saboteurs that you mention. It is more important to get them involved and give them ownership of some of the changes as they will soon may be the leaders of the organzation.

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      Frank, you summarized the module nicely. I would say we are our own worst enemies when it comes to change, meaning if we don't buy into it whole heartedly or present a clear vision of the need, be make it more difficult to implement.

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    Brian Johnson

    I believe that deep change will only come about when we accept and make the necessary personal changes that are required to be an effective leader. I have been studying the Positive Intelligence techniques for the past 10 months. My Judge and Controller have been influencing me all my life. I am know learning how to "catch" my Saboteurs and engage my Sage brain. It takes practice and understanding that this is a new life=long skill required for real personal change. It is making me a better leader, husband, father, and friend.

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      Chris Corbin

      My saboteurs have also been with me all of my life, but I am making slow, steady progress in bringing them under control. It definitely feels like a marathon at times, and when it does, I remind myself that all great achievements, such as a marathon, are completed one step at a time. And like you, this effort is producing results, the benefits of which are evident in both my personal and professional life.

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    Kyle Turner

    Change is difficult for any organization because it involves risk. Leaders have a low appetite for risk and therefore change as well. To admit that change is needed, is to admit that you are doing something wrong or inefficient, which ultimately requires humility and self-reflection. Again, nobody wants to admit they are wrong in their actions, especially leaders. However, as mentioned in previous modules, change travels laterally first then to different levels. We must, at our level, be accepting of mistakes that are produced as a result of change by our peers and subordinates and work with our subordinates to continue to develop, just like we will also make mistakes as we work toward deep change. This acceptance in itself may be a culture shift, but it is one that would benefit the organization in the long run.

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      Dan Wolff

      Kyle Turner,
      Our organization is going through this right now. We are changing a software that is very outdated and needs to be changed. What we are learning is each leader training the new system before we go live is take on the transformation leadership style. Showing confidence in what we are doing is right for the organization and guiding our peers through the unknown.
      Dan

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    Joey Prevost

    I definitely need to work on my positive intelligence. I know I need to work on my personal mental saboteurs. I feel like being Hyper Rational and Hyper Vigilant is what bogs me down at times. I definitely need to cultivate my inner sage.

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    Dan Wolff

    As I reviewed this module and learned of deep change and positive emotional intelligence the need for change is a never-ending cycle. In our organization we are currently getting ready to go live to a new dispatch, report writing, and record management system which is an entirely new system for us. Many sections within the organization have had to navigate barriers because of the negativity due to two delays because of software glitches in the past year. As we near the “go live” in less than a week, I see the 10 saboteur’s rising from the peers and management. Now is a perfect time to increase our EQ and PQ

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      Drauzin Kinler

      Dan, we went through the process of changing our RMS a little over a year ago. All I can say is that I wish you well. This will definitely have everyone on edge for a while. I can tell you that you will soon learn that the stickler saboteur was not one that the software company had high on their list. You are correct in the fact that to stay ahead, change is needed and is a never-ending process.

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      ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

      I fully understand. We just went live with a new RMS and most of the veteran officers are constantly complaining. Resistance to change!

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    Chris Corbin

    Someone once told me that there are two things that people don’t like, the first being change, and the second being things staying the way they are. In one of the units that I lead, we are currently working to effect deep change, from top to bottom. To help ensure that we are successful and that this initiative goes as smoothly as possible, we are giving our employees the freedom to lead the change. To support this, we are spending a great deal of time have open discussions about our mission, goals, pain points and the opportunities that lie in front of us. While we have a long way to go, I am confident that these efforts will lead to transformational change in each and every one of us, thereby allowing us all to grow as leaders.

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      Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

      I agree with your comment Chris about people complaining about not liking change and then also not liking when things stay the same. Similar to the old adage, you can't have your cake and eat it to!

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    Jarod Primicerio

    As I have been in the midst of attempting to initiate deep change within my agency, this module greatly assisted me in obtaining some rationale as to why it is so difficult to do so. There are so many barriers in place, coupled with personnel that fear or resist change, that it is nearly impossible. Thus, learning some of the details as to how to navigate forward, addressing some of the reasons why they are resistant, can assist in hoping to continue the progress.

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      Lance Landry

      Jarod, I agree. I wish I had participated in this module before we made our last deep change with a new report writing system.

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    Jason Porter

    We are moving from an outdated computer system to a more in-depth system of capturing information. This is a deep change, not an incremental one. One day we will be on the old system and the next day the new system will be on-line. There have been plenty of detractors wanting to just stay with what we know. Then the younger generation will feel right at home with the new system. The need for this deep change is a long time coming, but getting everyone on board for the change has been the most difficult task. No one likes to move away from something that they understand and know how to navigate.

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      Monte Potier

      I agree, when change is coming officers start worrying instead of understanding that most change is needed. It is only when the officers begin to feel comfortable their worries go away.

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        Judith Estorge

        I believe change is hardest for those officers not inside the click and getting their voices heard. If you are in the circle then you are involved in decisions and have input. Those outside do not have a voice and only learn of the changes made after they happen.

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      Lt. Mark Lyons

      Our agency recently went through a similar situation. We updated our system and had a lot of internal saboteurs and obstacle's to overcome. But In the end it all worked out well for everyone.

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      Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

      Jason,
      My agency went through a deep change recently with or data base system. Everyone was fearful but we invited our officers to participate in the building process of the system and provided a lot of hands on training. We switched over one day and we had hiccups however, now since the change, even older officers are very pleased that we made the leap.

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    Mike Brown

    I have seen first hand the differences between incremental and deep change and what it does to a department. I agree that some change is good and that a gradual easement into the change is better. Some people also need to not only see the big picture but study for themselves what the changes will bring.

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      Lance Leblanc

      Mike, in our department, I felt deep changes were needed to move forward. I personally felt the last three years as a department we have regressed because of poor leadership.

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    Drauzin Kinler

    After reviewing my Saboteur Assessment Results, I have a lot of self-improving that needs to happen. Some things that you would think are important to people like doing your job right, taking pride in what you do, being somewhat of a perfectionist, turns out it is not what a leader should want. I'm not really sure I agree with some portions of the assessment. For example, I cannot see paying 80k for a new vehicle and being ok with the vehicle falling apart because the people putting it together did not think any of the above traits were important.

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      Samantha Reps

      I also found that I have some self-improving to do after taking the assessment, it was an eye opener for sure.

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    Nancy Franklin

    Deep change is needed to keep individuals and organizations growing and moving forward, especially in the law enforcement profession. Societal changes have required organizations to rethink the way we have always done things because these "things" are no longer what our communities expect of us. I can't emphasize enough the fact that deep changes starts from within each of us. We must first change ourselves and dig deep to examine our core to understand who we are and who we need to be to be in alignment with our values. Leaders of change must exhibit the values and beliefs they desire in others to initiate deep change. Only when our inner core is aligned can we work to inspire others to focus and embrace the need to change. The ability to shift our perceptive and the perspective of others allows us to relate to the world around us differently than before. Leaders must be aware of others' points of view and work to address concerns and/or resistance to deep change to keep the transformation moving forward.

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    Lance Leblanc

    Deep change can often be difficult. Presently in my organization, we are in the process of some deep changes and it has split the department. From my perspective, the deep change within my agency was needed and it was a positive move.

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      Clint Patterson

      The thought or action of a deep change is difficult. We recently experienced a significant change within our agency, and it too felt like a divided agency, however now it has improved. Remain positive, and it will become a positive experience over time.

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    Chasity Arwood

    Change at any organization is difficult and many people resist even the smallest changes that are made. It is easier for most to Deep change is especially difficult to achieve because it involves taking risks and is permanent. Effective leaders must have the drive and willingness to make the changes needed for the betterment of the department.

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      David Ehrmann

      Too many people within organizations resist change out of fear of the unknown. They prefer the status quo, especially those who have been with the organization for a long time. Effective transitional leaders need to show these individuals the need for change and how the change can benefit the organization as a whole.

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        Lieutenant John Champagne

        I agree with those that resist change. When it comes to technology, if the older officers do not change, they will be stuck in the stone age, and law enforcement will leave them behind.

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        dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

        I agree with you, David. There are far too many "old-school" thinkers who resist changes when they should embrace it. Radical new thinking can benefit any agency when calculated risks are taken.

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    Judith Estorge

    The saboteurs are alive and well within my head. Positive self-talk is something I need to implement for overcoming this. Being mindful of my thoughts and their negative focus and exercising my positive intelligence muscles will be a regular habit I establish.

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      David Cupit

      I agree with you Judith, I have a great need for positive self talk as well. I need to practice dealing with the saboteurs more often and get my thoughts under control.

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      Henry Dominguez

      I agree with you Judith, I think we all need to increase our positive self-talk to better control our saboteurs, I also thinks its contagious to spread some positive thoughts to those around you and will help you surround yourself with other positive thinkers.

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    Brian Lewis

    This module gave a name to how I conduct myself in regards to vision and change. I am definitely a "transformational leader." I am constantly looking for ways to make things better. I've been this way my entire career. I have had more doors of change slammed in my face than opened. However, being a transformational leader has allowed my subordinates to experiment and grow. Saboteurs and leaders with lack of vision have never deterred me from trying to make change. I actually enjoy the challenge of changing people's minds.

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    David Cupit

    This was a great module. Loved the talk about about friendly versus enemy mode and also learning about the sage perspective. I think i get haunted by the restless saboteur, probably to often. I enjoyed learning about all 10 saboteurs.

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    Clint Patterson

    Deep change means an irreversible, radical change that cannot be controlled form the outside but comes from within. This to me seems like a manual for helping us find our internal leadership skills and powers. By helping us as leaders learn new ways of behaving and thinking, this points us in the direction of transforming ourselves from a form of victim to a person of change. Our agencies cannot change unless the personnel within that agency change. This is why personal change is crucial and without personal changes we can ultimately led ourselves into a form of burnout.

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    Laurie Mecum

    This module talks about deep change which is often difficult to achieve and is irreversible. It requires completely new ways of thinking and brings an organization out of its “norm”. Incremental changes is usually more rational and is process involved. It is reversible. Most often deep change is not utilized because of fear. It requires an organization to take some big risks.

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    David Ehrmann

    Deep change starts with personal change. A person must change themselves and their way of thinking before being able to instill change within an organization. Once personal change is achieved, they can begin to implement deep change within an organization. Implementing deep change within an organization that has functioned with one mindset is difficult to achieve. Individuals tend to fear change and want to stay with the status quo. However, creating an environment of empowerment can elicit buy-in from individuals, thus making the change long-lasting.

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    Roanne Sampson

    I believe one person can change an entire organization. We as leaders need to know who we are. In order to have a deep change, we must be irreversible, take risks, develop a new way of thinking, and distort current patterns of action. We have to be motivated. The saboteurs were interesting to learn about. I learned that I am a person who likes to make others happy. To improve our EQ, we need to weakened saboteurs, go into the sage mode and identify friendly versus enemy modes.

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      Christian Johnson

      Well said, Roanne.

      I have not seen many I would label as a saboteur in our Agency, but, as every other Agency on the planet, they do exist.

      I believe, though, that the emphasis that has been placed on leadership these past several years is giving us the tools and resilience to deal with them quite well.

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      Donnie

      I think this could happen with the right amount of people supporting the change you wish to make. This may prove a little more difficult at the deputy or entry officer level. It’s especially difficult when you work at the leisure of a Sheriff. Then your change has to be supported all the way to the top.

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      Royce Starring

      I believe this also but the one person has to be at the top of the organization or buy into the change that is being proposed.

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    Christian Johnson

    I agree that one person can change an organization, but at what level?

    I think it can be done at any level but is more difficult the lower you are in the chain of command. A Sheriff can just make a change. Everyone else must convince someone that it is the right thing to do and necessary. That's not so bad for a Major or Chief, but a Deputy would have a long list of people to convince before it got to the top. That is why the point made by Doctor Long regarding the need for someone with enormous moral strength and courage sticks with me.

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      Rocco Dominic, III

      That is so true, For a deputy to make the change would require enormous moral strength. That may not be enough the bureaucratic red tape would hold it up.

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    Amanda Pertuis

    After completing the assessment, I feel I've learned more about myself. I also took a lot from Improving Positive Intelligence and Increasing Positive Intelligence.

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    Rocco Dominic, III

    I liked the part about identifying and defeating your saboteurs. I also liked the part about alignment and energy how as we progress and learn increased our vitality and empowers us.

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    McKinney

    Fascinating topic. This model, which touched on Incremental Change and Deep Change, was an exciting concept. I can see that Incremental change poses obstacles for individuals who are accustomed to how things have always worked. Not knowing unchartered territories with Deep Change could easily be met with opposition, especially for those that do not like to venture close to the edge.

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    Donnie

    Deep change is a hard concept to accomplish. Incremental seems to be a bit easier and friendlier. Usually in law enforcement I have found that it’s the result of some sort of ripple effect. Something happens internally or externally to the department or agency and a change is made. It’s also done almost instantaneously creating a lot of stress throughout the organization. We tend to get comfortable in or environment when things are working well but become upset at the slightest thing that takes us out of alignment.

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      Burke

      Deep change is difficult. It has always been engrained in us that slow methodical "baby steps" was the way to go. I can see how the old ways could lead you back to old methods and ideas.

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    Lance Landry

    We all understand change can be difficult. After Dr. Long differentiated incremental versus deep change, I had a different understanding of a past, deep change made within my agency. The fears and uncertainties brought about with the investment of a large sum of money to implement a new report writing system within the department created havoc. It was truly a deep change with no potential to return to the “old way” things had been done before. The different saboteurs were clearly identifiable during this process which was eventually implemented successfully.

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      michael-beck@lpso.net

      We had the same RMS issue at our agency about 10 years ago at my agency. The person spearheading the conversion was a Deep Change Agent, but was dealing with a lot of entrenched ideas of what worked best. A lot of the Saboteurs we initially had were the same ones who believed if they didn't think of it, it wasn't any good. Eventually everything got up and running, with a few hiccups, but in the end we have a good product which we still use to this day.

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    Burke

    This was an interesting topic dealing with differences in incremental and deep change. It makes sense how we can fall back to our old ways in incremental change but deep change does not allow a pathway back. It is a concept that while using deep change I never was able to label it as such.

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      jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

      This topic was interesting for me as well. I never really new the differences in incremental change and deep change. But this showed me that my organization has a tendency to implement incremental change. There is always a fear of trying deep change because there is a natural tendency to fall back on the old way of doing things.

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        cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

        People will always resist change. They get set in their routines at home and at work and get comfortable. Too much change all at once causes resistance.

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      McKinney

      You are right; this was an interesting topic. It is assuring to know that we have a foundation that we can revert to when “incremental change” does not work in our favor, but it does allow for us to move forward with “deep change.” As you mentioned that “deep change” does not allow a pathway back to our old ways, and we more less have to move forward.

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    Royce Starring

    This module covers change focusing on incremental change versus deep change. It touched on the difference between the two, but when the lesson went in to positive intelligence and sabotage I became clear that there reason people resist change in the unknown and fear.

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    jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

    I sometimes find that my agency has trouble with change and when it does try to change. It follows the model of incremental change. Just like in the module, there is always a tendency to reverse to old ways and habits. The old guard leaders always want to bring back the old way because they are quick to judge if the change is actually working. By having a basic understanding of Deep Change, I hope to make a more influential impact on my agency.

    I was also intrigued with the content on sabotage and saboteurs and never really considered the fact that they both come from within myself. Eye opening thought.

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      I think nearly every agency wrestles with change. Not only is it more comfortable to stay with what you know, but to truly embrace Deep Change you have to give up some of the control. Many leaders are not willing to do that. With an understanding to what that change really means I wish you luck and see myself fighting the same battles.

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        cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

        Leaders who have unconditional confidence leads to mastery of the deep change process. People are scared of deep change for the fear of the unknown. Transformational leaders set the example for others to follow and are confident guiding people into the unknown. Another great module.

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      Major Stacy Fortenberry

      The ability to seek out and recognize the need for deep change in itself is hard. Being able to understand that the status que while it seems the safe route is truly the most dangerous long term.

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    Lieutenant John Champagne

    Incremental change is what most people see. Deep change is what scares people due to the unknown and lack of understanding. Law enforcement is continuously changing, and with technology, you see the deep change. I can only imagine the change we will see in law enforcement in the next 20 years. We must first understand personal change, which will allow us to take part in deep change to come.

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      anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

      I agree with the fact of the unknown is what keeps us as law officers on our toes. and the fact of an unknown change does the same because we don't how the change would affect us.

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    The risk and uncertainty of Deep Change demands strong leadership. History is full of glorified stories of leaders who carry their team through turbulent challenges, hopeless odds, and no win situations. The reason their team survives and often flourishes is the faith they put in their leader. Having the Positive Emotional Intelligence to overcome the saboteur is key to that success. Too often in law enforcement our strategy has been reactive. Many of the programs that are being pushed on law enforcement are actually asking for law enforcement to be proactive. Drug Court and Mental Health Court are ways to address the behaviors that are the root cause of a problems and not only the symptom of the cause. Other hot topic programs such as CIT, Implicit Bias Recognition, and De-Escalation have the same core tenant. Law Enforcement is being asked to identify and address the challenge before it becomes a problem.

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    mtroscla@tulane.edu

    "A ship in harbor is safe, but that is not what ships are built for." John Augustus Shedd

    I believe this is an accurate quote for the fear of change, staying the same will seem safe, but we need to accept some danger to meet our full potential.

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      guttuso_fa@jpso.com

      I really like that quote and agree it seems appropriate for this module. I find that part of the problem is after leaders are in their position for a long time, they tend to get stagnate and don't want to change. Leadership needs to change from time to time to keep fresh ideas coming to the forefront.

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    chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

    In the learning area 3, module 7, learning more about incremental and deep change was a good lecture. Learning that deep change can be hard to achieve with some adversities. We have to make sure and ensure that the energy and the alignment is lining up to assist in a change. Knowing that transformational leaders decide on change first and then reflect on changes outwardly.

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    michael-beck@lpso.net

    I found there was a lot of useful information in this module but it was covered very quickly. What I found most informative and thought provoking was the portion on Positive Emotional Intelligence. I believe a lot of changes or new programs we want to attempt always succumb to the Saboteurs of our own minds and are never anything more than fleeting thoughts. We allow us to talk ourselves out of extraordinary things because we believe they will not work or that someone else might not like our ideas then they won’t like us and on and on. A lot of this portion is that we need to get out of our own heads. If we are agents for positive change, then we need to fully believe that we are doing is good for our organizations and forget the naysayers, even if it is us.

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    Henry Dominguez

    I enjoy the saboteurs assessment and lecture on it because we can all do some personal reflection on one self to keep us planted and bettering ourselves. We tend to blame people or our outside surroundings when this module explains about looking internally at ones self to make change and we are our own saboteurs.

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    Major Stacy Fortenberry

    Really enjoyed the discussion of our own mind and saboteurs keeping us from becoming change agents and being more successful. This was something we all probably knew but it helps to have a definition and explanation for it. I will practice actions to increase EQ and PQ. A lot of this comes back to having courage. Courage to do what needs to be done even if it will be hard and meet resistance.

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    guttuso_fa@jpso.com

    If there is one thing that I have learned in my years of law enforcement it is that police officers don't like change. Even small change, unless it something that will benefit them right away. So I can see when you try to implement deep change there will definitely be resistance, Knowing the steps learned in this module will make it a little easier but I'm sure it will still be an uphill battle to enact deep change.

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      Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

      The implementation of that deep change will start with us and making sure we are deeply committed to being the change agents, making sure we are not self-sabotaging the change from the onset, will enable us to lead the followers into the change with greater accuracy and hopefully help them adjust their saboteurs as well.

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    ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

    Our agency is currently undergoing change to a new RMS. We have been studying this for two years and have had input from everyone. They were all excited and on board until we went live. Now the resistance to change has hit and they are complaining that they will never learn it and we shouldn't have changed. I have to think back to a former leader I had that told me one thing is for sure in police work and that is change. If you don't like the way things are, just wait it will change. If you like the way things are, just wait, it will change.

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    dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

    A wise officer once told a group of us, “Cops bitch when things change but complain when they remain the same”. That has to the wittiest explanation to a truth within a group of officers. Cops do favor change, if it is supported. Cops do not favor change if it will inconvenience a method that they are comfortable with. So what’s the solution? Those officers who are vying to be part of the bigger picture may resist a proposed change, unless it benefits the organization as a whole. Officers will view the stresses caused by incremental change in the same manner as deep change depending on how it may affect them.

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      cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

      It is important that everyone understand what the change is going to be and for everyone to feel like the change is for the them and the best for the organization.

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      dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree Darren, one of my favorite sayings is "the most dangerous phrase in the language is "we've always done it this way".

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      cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

      Perhaps by clearly communicating our vision and mission before the change is implemented will help. Many times, I feel like we initiate a new policy or procedure but don't explain our why. We sometimes express it in our Staff Meetings but sometimes it gets lost in translation ... or never gets communicated at all. Some days I feel like I have information overload. I definitely perceive a gap in effective communication and try to work towards being part of that solution. We have identified some steps to help bridge that gap and are working on improving in on our own behalf.

      We have so many amazing people here with a vision, passion for what they do, top-notch expertise, and motivation that could move mountains but we sometimes fail to nurture and develop that positive force and help guide others to our organization's vision.

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    As we look at the world today, the six traits that Dr. Long refers to play a big part in all of us. I chose a caring character. We all must care. In today's world, we all need to care just a little more about people. We need to go the extra mile to ensure their health and well-being.

    The other five are just as important and play their role in what we do to take care of staff.

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    cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

    Change is not something law enforcement professionals care for. Little changes can sometimes make the biggest waves. I can see how deep change can really be hard to implement and for officers to accept. As a leader is it important to make sure the change is explained and officers fully understand what it to take place.

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      Adam Gonzalez

      Your post is a little off of topic from my original post but I couldn't help but relate to what you wrote about. Indeed, sometimes it is the little changes that do cause the biggest waves in an organization. This touches upon a subject briefed in an earlier module. Buy in really is essential for true change to occur. Everyone should feel that they are part of the changing agent and not just compelled to change because of decisions made by others. We are all share holders within our police agency and therefore we should all have some voice. I feel that this is especially true for when change is necessary. Thank you for your post!

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    dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

    Change is something that is extremely difficult in law enforcement I believe, We get set in our ways and are creatures of habit. However, change is inevitable, especially if it is needed. One of my favorite quotes has always been, the most dangerous phrase in the language is "we've always done it this way". I was reluctant to change up until becoming a leader in my agency and understanding why change is necessary and can be beneficial. We recently dealt with and are still dealing with change, due to a new RMS. It is frustrating at times, but overall I believe beneficial to the agency.

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      blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

      I agree; I was the same way with change. Change can be great if there is a good plan for the change. You need to most of the answers for the change and the problems that can occur. The RMS system was a rushed plan, which made the transition more complex. I believe it will also benefit the agency. I know that there were other factors for the time frame, but the communication was not effective.

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        mmoscona@floodauthority.org

        When our new Chief took over he initiated a new mind set and massive changes that were absolutely needed. The problem was in the message and roll out. I don't think we were properly prepared for the sudden and drastic changes. More communication to help with buy in would have made things much easier.

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    Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

    This lecture leads off discussing deep change and the impacts on our agencies, we learned that without deep change we risk deterioration and becoming irrelevant. If we can become change agents individually and help manifest change amongst our peers we can help facilitate deep change that is needed. The second part of the lesson defining our sabotage agents was highly thought-provoking, I realized quite a few of my saboteurs and will utilize the skills to strengthen my EQ and PQ.

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    blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

    I was never in favor of a change, but the change was always forced onto us without any consideration of how it affected everyone. Or when asking questions about the change, there was still unknown factors because the change was not well thought out, and it was not communicated. No one from the bottom could understand the change and why the change was occurring. These examples are why, as leaders, we need to communicate and collaborate so we can empower our officers to want to make deep changes.

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    As leaders, when we take over a new agency or department, we must remember that the "changes" we make will have a ripple effect. If we are subtle and explain the small incremental changes, we make the ripple effect will be a lot less. We need to be careful of the Deep Changes, due to the destruction that it can cause, and how irreversible that it is.

    When I took over as chief, I was warned about significant changes, and the effects it can have on morale. However, most of the incremental changes we never noticed by the officers, cause they were rolled out subtle, and with information advising why for the difference.

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    anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

    As with any change, it will be alarming to all workers, not everyone will be receptive. In change for the better of an agency, sometimes you have to use deep change, because of the severity of ongoing issues. As a leader, we have to figure out the best way to soften the impact of the change.

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      sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

      As harsh as it sounds, but as one of the previous modules speakers stated. If they're not receptive to change give them a chance or let them go.

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      For some, change is always hard, not just because of what they think they will lose, but because they just do not want to. I agree with you that we, as leaders, have to look at the best way to change, and there are times that we have to do it, without a safety net.

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      Sergeant Chad Blanchette

      Agreed. I think to make the changes that are necessary, it is crucial to bring the key players from each area into the mix to help produce an action plan.

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    sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

    While incremental change is an easier pill to swallow, sometimes when a new leader takes over an organization. A deep change is necessary, due to any long standing issues the new leader finds or was aware of before taking over. Its the long time installed base of employees who would have the hardest time adapting or leaving/terminated altogether.

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      wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

      I agree deep change requires new ways of thinking and behaving. When initiating deep change, it is more more major in scope and doesn't focus on making connections with the way things were done in the past requiring more risk taking. Deep change is harder to achieve. Important aspect to changing is the fact that you are taking action to change together.

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    steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

    Change is a great thing throughout an organization. I feel that if I came to work every day and said, lets keep doing the same thing every day, just as we did before, I would be very bored of my career. I have always been a proponent of attempting to improve processes to obtain better results. Although in the past, I have been expected to provide better results with only being allowed to use the same methods as before. I look at it as watching a football team attempt to make yards by running it up the middle and not gaining or loosing yards. Makes you very fustrated that the offense does not attempt to alter the game plan to achieve better results. An organization with the correct planning, team support, and the moral value to succeed in the the change, become successful in deep change.

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    cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

    Learning about Deep Change and Positive Intelligence was eye opening to me. As we went through the 10 Saboteurs I reflected on people, both in my organization and/or in my person life, who tend to display these characteristics. I have definitely released that I am "the Pleaser". I have always thought that this was a positive attribute to have, especially as support personnel, but now I can see how this in excess can be unhealthy. Knowing how to identify saboteurs, exercise my positive emotional intelligence and measure my positive emotional intelligence will help me more effectively reach my potential.

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      clouatre_kj@jpso.com

      I too was very interested in learning more about all of the saboteurs. It was very interesting to hear about all of these and to think about the people I know with the various ones that present themselves.

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    I feel that it is important for a leader to embrace change. It shows that the leader is willing to keep up with the forever changing world. As a leader, I will make sure I continue to embrace deep change and find ways to influence others.

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    dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

    After reviewing this module, I know what my mental saboteurs are and how I need to combat them. I feel that I tend to be a pleaser or hyper-achiever and those are the main areas I need to focus on to become a better leader.

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      This module was extremely helpful for me as it helped me identify my mental saboteurs. Now that I have properly identified by saboteurs I can work on shifting into the correct mindset when interaction with co-workers.

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        Kyle Phillips

        I agree with you, I was quite surprised by my own saboteurs and to be honest, I had no idea they existed prior to this module. Now that I am aware of what my saboteurs are, I can focus on making changes to lessen their effects and presence.

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    clouatre_kj@jpso.com

    This was a very data heavy module. It was interesting to me to learn more about saboteurs and to think about how those most common ones pop up in my day to day life as well as others on my team. The idea of inner wisdom/sage was never something I considered previously. I was glad to hear about ways we could counteract the negative inner voice to think more positively.

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    This module was very insightful on just how powerful a tool the mind is. As leaders, we must be forward-looking and identify issues on the horizon if possible. When a change is needed, we must be in the correct mindset and examine the problem from all imaginable angles and understand the risk/ reward that comes with implementing the change. If our minds are not in the correct mode, we can sabotage our ideas before implementation. We must also ensure that we can clearly explain why change is needed and how it will positively impact our followers.

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    dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

    In this module we are presented with the 10 saboteurs. This was interesting as i can see what i tend to exhibit. But also i can effectively place a face with someone that exhibits each one of these saboteurs. You can look at these individuals and now know how to assist that person in changing their thought process to help them out. But that person has to be willing to accept chnage.

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    Adam Gonzalez

    Like many comments and posts here, I was intrigued mostly by the information and cautions presented about saboteurs. As I take a moment and reflect upon my 20-plus year career, it has been some of the people that I have worked with that have been the most challenging. Especially regarding situations and emergencies, arrests and court proceedings, incidents in general, I have had the most difficulty with some supervisors and with some that were supposed to have my back, that were supposed to be honest, and that were supposed to be looking out for the greater good that have caused the most issues and in many ways, the most disappointment. It is up to us to assist others in changing from bad and/or irresponsible and/or reckless behavior to responsible servants that their community and family's can be proud of, as well as their agency's. And, this is often accomplished through our direct example. Doing what is right, even when no on else is looking!

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      I agree and one of the most poignant concepts Dr. Long spoke about was easy to miss. Dr. Long stated the first step of change must be individually focused. How many times do we think our problem was with someone else when it was really our problem to begin with? Going through the list of saboteurs, I can easily name the ones that I default to. My sage has a lot of work to do...lol.

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    mmoscona@floodauthority.org

    I took the optional saboteurs assessment and I have a pretty good idea what I need to work on to bring balance into my thinking. There was a lot of information presented in this module but it was very good information. Very thought provoking.

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    Dr. Long was correct, we did cover a lot of ground, in this lecture. The different types of change and the expansion of the resistance to change provided a good basis to seek success. To the subject of increasing our positive intelligence, The first two points, we have been taught since the academy or FTO. The Power Game is equivalent to playing the "what if" game for situational awareness and the positive intelligence exercises are very similar to combat breathing.

    When it comes to our positive intelligence improvement, this relies on the individual being honest with themselves, completely. This is something that I hope that I can do, for my improvement. While we have talked about self inventory or self awareness, we have to be honest. as sometimes we see ourselves in a better light than someone that is observing us.

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    Lt. Mark Lyons

    I completely agree with the principles of change and how important it is for both the organization and us as individuals to stay up to date with modern trends and industry standards. Change, indicates growth.

    I also enjoyed the information about the saboteurs and how they operate. As the instructor began to define each type of saboteur I could relate each one with someone I have had dealings with in the past. Overall, I thought this was a very good and informative training module.

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      Lt. Joseph Flavin

      I agree, especially in today's fast changing world, it's vital we stay up to date on those trends and standards. I also enjoyed learning about the saboteurs and found myself self-reflecting on them as each one was defined. Understanding those saboteurs and being able to identify them is key to building your positive intelligence.

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    This module is a great advocate for how change can be a good and/or great thing. Change agents in our agencies keep agencies from being stale or stagnant. In today's world, the public is demanding change for things that are up for improvement, more with less. The ability to engage and have a dialect, using the SAGE skills and other items will help leaders stay current on what agencies need to serve people.

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    wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

    The control of this change is in the hands of the one making the change and the approach is widely used. As an organization we must remember that an important aspect to changing is the fact that you are talking action to change together.

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    The art of change can be difficult to master. Sometimes it happens to fast and feels like trying to drink water from a fire hose and other times it is so slow it is like watching paint dry. I believe changes are important but more importantly is are they needed. I have a huge problem with people effecting change just because they want to have their personal stamp on something. Keeping up with current crime trends, technologies and training is where change should be occurring regularly but often we seem to be playing catch-up. I am fortunate that our agency has taken notice and moved away from many of the things that had us stuck in the "old ways".

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      Deputy Mitchell Gahler

      I agree that change can be difficult and easy to reject. Change is important in order to help us grow and gain more knowledge as we grow as professional and with personal development. The more we change and grow, the more we develop with the times in order to potentially gain the tactical edge.

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      Nice response. I agree that change is often necessary to prevent stagnation and keeping up with the times. I also agree that change for the sake of change adds needless stress on an organization. When I was a military investigator we would get a new commander every two years. He/She usually had to come in and make sweeping changes just to affix their name to a process.

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      Sergeant Durand Ackman

      So true. I like your analogies of "drinking from a fire hose" and "watching paint dry" as both are true when it comes to change. The things we feel need to be changed seem to take forever and those we don't want to change seem to change overnight. I agree with you about the most important question - do we need to make the change? You mentioned technology and trends, both of those are essential for us to change and keep up to date with current technology and trends.

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    Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

    I think of the old saying "Cops don't like change and they don't like the way things are." This is a true statement for any profession. You become accustomed to doing thinks a certain way and become comfortable with the routine. People will resist change even if it for their own benefit.

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      Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

      In this module, the ten saboteurs are presented by Doctor Long. I work with several peers with these traits. When I was a sergeant, I worked under a Watch Commander that was a saboteur. I was able to work with this supervisor and help him to rethink his thought process which seemed to lend a helping hand from time to time, However, for an overall change one must want to change.

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        Sergeant James Schueller

        That's very encouraging that you were able to able to work with a supervisor to change their thought process. It's impressive for both you and the Watch Commander to make this happen. I think you made the key point int that in order for this to happen, they must want the change.

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      Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

      I have worked for a few with this problem. These individuals are still doing things the same way and continue to have the same issues.

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      Lt. Marlon J Shuff

      And the lower they are in the rank structure the, more complaining and resisting they will do. This is why the need for change should be explained so that "buy-in" is obtained early in the change process.

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      I definitely agree with your statement, cops do not like change. As a new leader, I have noticed how slow change can be. Especially when you have upper administration that has been around for more than 35 years. Deep change is extremely hard for these individuals because they have been comfortable in their ways for many many years. I have to continually remind them to not use terms such as "because we have always done it that way" or "I don't have to do that because I put in my time." There needs to be a continual reminder of the vision in order to keep people on track.

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    Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

    The nine saboteurs that were discussed in the module were very interesting to me. As I reflected on myself, I understand that it can be very difficult to work with someone who is always unsatisfied. I am a very positive and upbeat person. That can cause negativity and possibly strain working relationships. Recognizing that I have this trait, I have to utilize my inner wisdom, or the “sage” to prevent the negativity of my saboteur from attacking my brain.

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    Lt. Marlon J Shuff

    Sometimes change upsets the delicate balance of things, which is why there is a resistance to it. Some people like to operate in their comfort zones, and for many, the way things are is just fine. For this reason, leaders must communicate why change is necessary. Often, those who are impacted by the change are not aware of why it’s happening. Effective communication is vital here.

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    Deputy Mitchell Gahler

    In this module, Long discussed deep change and positive emotional intelligence. One of the key phrases that I took from this module was, "It's okay to get lost with confidence. When that happens, you are learning and doing." Many of the decisions we make are very critical, and sometimes the wrong ones, which lower our confidence. It's how we learn from those situations that's important, as we discover different ways to correct the behavior and make better decisions. "In this way, you become an internally driven leader, because an internally driven leader has found requisite internal motivation to change and maintain the energy it takes to follow through." I found that quote to be very helpful and informative.

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    Lt. Joseph Flavin

    Deep change and positive emotional intelligence was discussed in this module. Deep change is a new concept to me. It was very informative to learn about. Understanding how difficult deep change is to achieve provides me with an understanding as to why there is so often more incremental change with departments rather than that deep change. The 10 types of saboteurs was enlightening also as I found myself self-reflecting throughout that topic. It's important to me that I identify those saboteurs early on before I let them effect my mindset.

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    This module was excellent at providing the reasons that change is so difficult within organizations. I have experienced resistance towards change on a continual basis over my first two years as Sheriff. Most of it has come from my upper administration. Many of them have been there 30 plus years and so they feel that how we have been operating is acceptable. But as technology, our community, media, and the expectations from our citizens have changed I have encouraged an organizational change to remain current with what is expected from our citizens. It has been a constant work in progress but it is coming along slowly.

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      Ryan Manguson

      Change can be a slow process. Especially deep change. The important thing is to properly recognize when change is needed and taking the steps to make change happen.

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    Sergeant James Schueller

    The discussion of the elements that fuel our resistance to change; Fear of the Unknown and Uncertainty of risk and cost, are huge roadblocks for moving forward on organizations. I think the module hit keys points then, in discussing what a true transformational leader is and does for an organization. I liked the definition that stated a transformational leader decides on the change first, and then reflects the change outwardly, meaning walking the talk. This action alone from the top can and does motivate followers. The biggest learning point for me fro the material was the list of the Ten Saboteurs. As Dr. Long listed and defined each, it was eye-opening for me to put members of my own organization- past and present- into those roles. Perhaps more telling was to see which of those roles I myself may have portrayed myself over the course of my career. Looking at it from that perspective made me feel proud of where I am at with myself and within my organization, and see how time, experience, and maturity have all played a role in shaping where I am at. This was good module for some much needed self-reflection.

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    Kyle Phillips

    I enjoyed learning about the ten saboteurs and taking the self assessment. This was a learning experience and will require self-reflection to learn how to combat those saboteurs moving forward. I also found it interesting that the two main reasons people resist change are the fear of the unknown, and the uncertainty of the risk and cost. That makes a-lot of sense and when compared with changes I have recently seen implemented, aligns with some of the opposing views.

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    Sergeant Chad Blanchette

    I found the 9 ways we self-sabotage self-assessment a good reflection of my personality. I believe it will certainly help me be a better leader by knowing my strengths and weaknesses.

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    Eduardo Palomares

    One thing that police officers and don’t like is change. But we also don’t like to be stagnant. It is important to note that the vast majority of people in police organizations resist change. The attitude of, “we have always done it this way” is prevalent in police organizations. This is why it is important for us as leaders to know how to apply incremental and deep changes. Change requires adapting to new set of rules or procedures which involves risk. With change it comes the unknown or uncertainty which is something that cops don’t like. Realistically, in order to make change cancerous consideration must be taken when trying to be a change agent for the greater good. I am currently in the process of implementing an officer wellness program and peer support group. This will require a deep change in our organizational culture as some already have criticized it due to the stigma of asking for help is a sign of “weakness” for some. I will definitely face resistance but the outcome for the betterment of my people and organization is worth the risk. This was a great module. It made me reflect on how l have self-sabotaged my development in the past because of my lack of positive emotional intelligence.

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      Eduardo was spot on.. Police officers dislike change. I will also add that they hate things the way they are as well. This is a concept that my department has attempted to get its head around for some time. For my agency, the big change involved our schedule which was causing some issues. We ran the gambit of why change "we've always done it that way" to "what's in it for me". We tried our best to solicit feedback and be open and transparent about the process but it came down to communication (both up and down the chain of command) and early intervention by change agents in the org. In hindsight, we could have done better in both of these areas. Fundamentally, this was a deep change with a bunch of incremental steps to get us there. Eduardo, the establishment of a Employee Wellness program is a noble and life saving endeavor. There is no doubt that the Risk is more than worth it.

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    Ryan Manguson

    I enjoyed this module on Deep Change and Positive Intelligence. It brought greater understanding for me between the difference in the two. I liked the information on organizational coalitions and how dominate coalitions can be resistant to deep change as they has satisfied with the status quo. Instead they are in favor of incremental change that allows for them to return to the ways of the past if the incremental change is not successful. I have seen that first hand over my career. In recent years my organization has been going through more long term deep change with a change in leadership.

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      Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

      Couldnt agree more Lt, after watching this module a few methods of change came to mind at RPD that we are trying to implement. This clarified and defined the reasons for me as to how to influence others to accept this change. The more we influence, the more greater our momentum becomes.

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    Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

    This module clarified methods of change for me. It really put people into 2 categories when it comes to change. We all have those in our agency that are content with the status quo and content with the current way we are doing things. Fortunately, many agencies have those few that are focused on the deep change and looking to better enhance the process. These leaders are looking to transform the processes and improve our service to each other as well as the agency. I think the greatest challenge faced by administrators today is getting everyone on the page with accepting deep change and having a greater impact.

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      Maja Donohue

      I agree. Deep change has to become a new way of life in the agency, otherwise it loses momentum and often gets reversed.

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      Gregory Hutchins

      As the courses are complementing each other, the main challenge to profound change is courage. Leaders who make the change initiative happen are the most likely to halt the process out of self-serving needs. Stop and listen to the young officers that continually espouse profound change ideas, and with many, they are willing to leap in faith as they conceptually have nothing to lose. They are willing to move on to another job or agency if a plan fails. If many senior leaders were to look back at their younger selves and their "stump speeches," the same theme existed back then. Courageous leaders will step up and risk their safety for the organization's good if it means enough. Too often, it does not.

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    Sergeant Durand Ackman

    This was a good module about change. Interesting discussion about analyzing the need for change as well as different types of change. Dr. Long described the difference between Incremental and deep change. Most changes I've seen are incremental. One thing that really stood out to me was fairly subtle but really struck a chord with me was when Dr. Long said incremental changes are often reversible. I've seen so many changes occur that are eventually reversed and people go back to the old way. In some examples this is a decision made by those that initially made the change but more often it is a decision made by those that are actually doing the task. I found Dr. Long's comments about transformational leaders interesting and thought of a few people in my organization's past and present.

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      Sergeant Kelly Lee

      I agree Durand, most organizations favor incremental change because they are afraid to make the deep change where going back to the old way most likely isn't an option as well as they may not have a true leader who wants to "put their neck out there" and be the driving force behind a deep change that may or may not work.

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    Sergeant Paul Gronholz

    I appreciated the information on positive intelligence and the saboteurs we all have within us. I certainly am affected by negative thoughts about myself and my performance that hinder my progress. I thought it was very helpful how they identified each of the 10 types of saboteurs. I am affected by everyone. I will work to switch to the positive sage and inner wisdom.

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      Christopher Lowrie

      Having knowledge about saboteurs is key. It is important that people try to stir away from these types. Using empathy, exploration, innovation, navigation, and decisive action can help with saboteurs.

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      Every one of those saboteurs has gotten me at on point or another. Sometimes they gang up on me. HA.

      Seriously, it can take daily self affirmation to overcome the negative voices within us.

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    Samantha Reps

    I found the nine ways of self sabotage to be eye opening and self reflecting, I would like to take a self inventory and become a better leader by doing this. Also, the topic of 10 saboteurs made me reflect on both my professional and personal life.
    Deep change has to start with personal change and we need to understand what we need to overcome.

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    Before this presentation, I never really considered mental/ emotional saboteurs before. I guess that's because I find myself trying to combat the real life ones (many of which are in my own organization). Due to COVID, I frequently work from home. When I work from home, my primary connection with my subordinates is through email. I noticed early on that some of my saboteurs surfaced as a result. I became more of a stickler about things and I became a little more controlling. When I noticed this, I tried to tell others how this experience made me feel but until now, I didn't understand why I was feeling the way I did, and I was not able to properly identify and define my saboteurs. I did the on line assessment and was not surprised by the results. I think that Dr. Long was correct. It does come down to deciding between my own self interests and what's best for my agency. Recognizing these negative factors is the first step to combating them and then its important to know if your mind is in "enemy or friendly" mode. I think that by increasing my Emotional and Positive intelligence, I will do a much better job of managing my mental saboteurs.

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      Timothy Sandlin

      I agree. The section on saboteurs helped me gain a greater understanding of them and how they impact not only myself, but others that I work with routinely. Great information.

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    Maja Donohue

    After watching this module, I now have a better understanding of why deep change is so difficult on the organizational level. It takes tremendous moral courage on the part of a transformational leader to stand up and say that change is necessary and to lead the way into uncharted territory. Not many are able or willing to put their reputation and career aspirations on the line to do this, and fewer still can say they have done so successfully. Organizations that welcome this type of leadership will surely flourish beyond anyone’s expectations. I also appreciated the explanation Dr. Long gave on the differences between deep change and incremental change. It appears that incremental change has the effect of a Band-Aid for a small cut whereas deep change has the effect of a surgeon removing a cancerous tumor. Two very different approaches for two very different purposes. As leaders, we need to understand when to get the first aid kit and when to go see a doctor to initiate organizational change.

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    Sergeant Kelly Lee

    Interesting concepts on the phase changes of either incremental or deep change. After going through this module it is easier to understand why some organizations don't ever change or take so long to change. Deep change (which most organizations) most likely need if they are being honest doesn't happen overnight and takes lots of teamwork and someone to actually push it and take the leap of faith to complete it. That is probably why some organizations remain flat due to the fact that staying the status quo is easier and they have no true leader to make the big decisions.

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      Robert Schei

      I agree, finding a leader who is willing to take the risks associated with deep change is challenging. Incremental change requires much less investment and risk and is why so many departments just tweak practices or policies but avoid the major over halls that may be needed for continued success.

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    Magda Fernandez

    I really enjoyed this model. It brought a different perspective on the implementation of change. I have a better understanding of why leaders are reluctant to do deep changes in organizations. Deep Changes can take time to fully implement and see the desired out come depending on how it was deployed. it has been my experience that incremental changes are done to eventually achieve the desired deep change the leadership originally wanted. They did not want to shock the core of the department. Those changes have taken years to implement and it has take that long to see any effects of the change. By the time the results are yielded new changes are needed. It does take a courageous leader to take risks to implement a deep change to an organization.

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    Christopher Lowrie

    I like to challenge myself to use sage powers. I would like to untap inner wisdom that can help with saboteurs. Truly possessing empathy will go a long way in developing rapport. Having the ability to be genuine and show compassion and forgiveness is an important power.

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      Major Willie Stewart

      Christopher,
      Great statement, I feel as a true leader we must have some form of empathy and understanding for our followers. Especially as law enforcement officers. As leaders we may not always be on the frontline but it is important to listen to our people and show concern. Paying attention and the willingness to make things better will have an everlasting impact on our organizations.

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    Major Willie Stewart

    What I liked most about Dr. Long’s lessons in this module was distinguishing the difference between deep change and incremental change. I think it is something that we can all use in our personal and professional lives. Change is inevitable. Take for instance COVID-19, it forces us to undergo change. This section explains that deep change is often risky and there’s a chance we won’t go back to the old ways. But it begins with self. I think in the field of law enforcement our backs are against the wall and it’s time that some of us and our organizations take the steps to undergo deep change. Change begins with self.

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      Very good post! The change definitely starts with us and we need to be good sales-people. Show people the benefits and what's in it for them. We'll never get everyone on board but if we at least try and put forth constant messaging, we can only succeed I would think. Bottom-up change, give people some ownership.

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    So often we do not want to take risks that could negatively effect us. Even if the reward is worth it. So easy to just do what we have always done and get by. Learning to get past self sabotage to better yourself and the organization is key.

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    Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

    I found the concept of the sage expression to be vey intriguing. This is concept or term that is new to me and something I would like to focus on. Especially the peace of mind in focused action and in the middle of crisis.

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    I really liked this lesson and I found the parts about incremental and deep change the most useful. Change is always something that everyone is uncomfortable with. It doesn't matter if you are the one implementing the change or the one that is going to have to change the way you are doing something or completing a task. Incremental change is something that I see a lot of leaders deciding to make changes but then becoming to scared of the consequences of something not working out the way they hoped it would or negatively impacting the organization or people. Deep change is something long term and will most likely need the leader to have confidence and experience to achieve.

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    Viewing this module leads me to believe most of the difficulty with deep change starts individually with the idea of change or the fact that most wait until its necessary to make a change. It would seem if you know and believe the change is needed and then convey it in a way that makes other understand and believe, the transition would be smoother. Go into it knowing there is risk for failure and have the mindset to adjust to the problems as needed.. Getting yourself to that point is the challenge. Understanding your personal saboteurs and how to combat them helps.

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      Nicole Oakes

      I agree with your point and again, being in law enforcement we want to make everything better, so maybe we really need to focus internally and make those hard changes inside.

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    Deep change can is sooooo difficult in law enforcement for many reason. It is an arena where failure is not tolerated. most involved are career oriented and don't want to risk career advancement by rockin' the boat. Sometimes, all it takes is one person in the chain of command to say "no" and the change is done before it ever got started. It's difficult to get all the stars to align for deep change to have a chance.

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      Andy Opperman

      Your right Jed, Deep change is difficult, it takes a persistent leader to drive this type of change. Many leaders get worn down by the bureaucratic system and they lose the steam to persist and take big risks. I think many times the biggest challenges in a larger department are the organizational coalitions. They really can throw up roadblocks.

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    Timothy Sandlin

    I enjoyed this module. The steps to achieving deep change is more complex and involves new ways of thinking - training your brain, and results in actions or new behavior. This is long lasting and sustainable change. The part on positive intelligence and being able to recognize those inward thoughts that act to sabotage you being able to achieve success. The personal development to recognize those inward thoughts or emotions, change to a positive thought, seize control, and have the mind help serve to accomplish positive outcomes instead of interfere in the process.

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    Nicole Oakes

    I find this module very enlightening and educational. I believe that it explains so much about law enforcement officers and our reluctance towards change. We are saboteurs. Most people in law enforcement state that they do this job to help people. We often view this as going in and taking control of the situation and making everything ok. We have the best intentions but we are self-sabotaging by being controllers.

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      Spot on Nicole. We are our own worst enemies. Too often I think officers go out of their way to let the saboteurs in and thus this derails progress. This is why I believe in global education about leadership (and change management) not just educating the top of the organization. Those who spend time studying should appreciate what we're trying to do versus those who shoot spitballs from the sidelines.

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      Brad Strouf

      Absolutely agree with your assessment. We are oftentimes our own worst enemy. This module was enlightening and thought provoking.

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    The saboteurs part of the module was quite interesting and poignant. I can appreciate all of them at various points in my leadership and employment journey. Restless is probably one of my weakest/strongest saboteurs for sure. I am constantly looking to move the bar and find myself busy all the time in my brain. I have a hard time letting things lie for sure. So I guess this is a double-edged blade, it is a good thing but also weighs me down.

    The other area is learned (or at least we reinforced) was the bottom-up change idea. I would like to think that I employ this already because it is so valuable to the success of the change. Including those at the end-user side of things can only benefit from change and I've found that others have great ideas that I never saw. The buy-in that this type of system creates is only a positive for the organiation.

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    Robert Schei

    The idea that 1 person can change the organization in which they exist is quite powerful. I liked how this lecture broke down the key elements of incremental and deep change. Most often organizations fall back on incremental change because it is safe and offers a way out. Deep change is risky and we are typically risk averse in law enforcement. Not only does the risk involved with deep change become an obstacle but finding a leader who is willing to champion the change through all of its obstacles is difficult. Some thought provoking points were made in this lecture and I found the specific examples of saboteurs to be quite interesting.

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      Sgt. Shawn Wilson

      Instilling the belief that 1 person can change an organization has powerful effects. It gives ownership to the person to continually strive for greatness not only for themselves but for the organization. A leader only willing to implement incremental change will eventually fail or become obsolete. Although deep change brings with it a higher degree of risk it also brings about the chance for an organization to be great.

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    Andy Opperman

    I took away from this module the important lessons of Saboteurs. Many times, in our career we are our own worst enemy when comes to the ability to achieve and create effective change. Many good leaders struggle with the Judge, and the Stickler. We create more stress and anxiety for ourselves than necessary. Being able to recognize when these Saboteurs are upon us and mitigate them, I believe will give us a happier and more positive career. Understanding Saboteurs is also an effective strategy for helping our own people understand themselves and gives us the better ability to coach them.

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      Matthew Menard

      I agree, Andy. The better we can understand our own personal road blocks or saboteurs, the more effective we can be in implementing change and leading others towards change.

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    Sgt. Shawn Wilson

    Knowing what our saboteurs are and recognizing them when they present themselves is important as a leader. The breakdown of the various saboteurs made them easily identifiable. When we can identify them we then can mitigate the negative effects that come with them, increased stress, anxiety, anger. I have pushed these out to my team so that they can identify what their triggers are and hopefully reduce some stress in their lives.

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      Seeing them written down and being able to recognize each of them was hugely helpful. Great idea to push out to your team and I may do the same, and send out the self-assessment.

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    This module really open my eyes in reference to how many different saboteurs there really are. The judge, stickler, pleaser, hyper achiever, victim, hyper rational, hypervigilant, restless, controller, and avoider. I have personally ran into almost all of the saboteurs throughout my career. And now with this module. I will be able to know how to deal with each in the future.

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    Brad Strouf

    Where Incremental Change is easy and more comfortable, Deep Change is necessary to achieve any long-lasting and real improvements in the agency. I have seen incremental change attempted time and time again with very little results. This module was very interesting in the way the differences in change were explained and the roadblocks identified.

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    I'm a little shy in admitting it has actually taken me several weeks to complete just this module as affecting deep and personal change take a serious amount of reflection and effort. During this same time, I have been participating in a cohort for leadership change pertaining to implicit bias and racism throughout our organization. After reading, and studying, the saboteurs, I quickly realized that I do some of these things in this cohort group. I need to not only change the way I think, but practice it daily, especially when that “enemy” shows up during situations that decisions need to be made. I took the saboteur self-assessment and asked a few of my closest friends to take the assessment and answer the questions as how they view me, not how they would think I would answer. The results were not what I expected…at all. There were some similarities, but definitely some differences in areas that I was not aware of.

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    Gregory Hutchins

    The term of sabotage is a unique way to describe the naysayers or mental blocks of organizational change. Many of the internal sabotage types are related to icebergs or ruminating. Negative thinking creates a downward cycle of thoughts that prey on the worst-case scenario. The unfortunate part is most leaders do not have the skillset to accept that the likelihood is exceptionally slim during a potential course of action. Entering into a decision-making process with preconceptions or beliefs is a toxic mechanism as one is not open to the new change endeavor or suggestion.
    As seen within military planning, course of action development identifies the most likely and most dangerous events and establishes values. At some point, the leader takes a risk to implement a plan. As a paramilitary organization, it is impressive to see how leaders refuse to take risks from fear of failure and execute a change endeavor that will profoundly change the agency. Nevertheless, the military routinely does it with much fewer younger leaders with many dire consequences on the line.

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    Matthew Menard

    I found the explanation of deep change to be interesting. Humans naturally resist change as a way of avoiding stress and to maintain a sense of normal, therefore the concept of deep changing being so difficult is not surprising to me. That being said, any change that truly makes a difference and moves an organization forward or towards a worthwhile goal will require a lot effort and most likely be difficult.