Command and Staff Program

ACE Track

Conflict Management

Replies
222
Voices
113
Dr. Mitch Javidi
Instructions:  
  1. Post a new discussion related to the topics covered in this module.  Your post needs to provide specific lessons learned with examples from this module helping you enhance your leadership capacity at work.
  2. After posting your discussion, review posts provided by other students in the class and reply to at least one of them. 
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    Chris Corbin

    Given how close-knit the law enforcement community is, I was surprised to learn that most of the conflict that officers face in their workplaces comes from internal sources. While this is unfortunate, the good news is that because it originates in our halls, it means that we absolutely have the ability to address it and provide our personnel with the positive, professional work environment and culture that they deserve. The "tips to manage conflict effectively" look very useful and I am going to share them with our training cadre to see whether they might include them within our in-house training on communication. Finally, the Path to Restoration also looks like a very useful tool and one that we may need to find room for in our advanced supervisory training.

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      Frank Acuna

      As a police officer and someone who has been in law enforcement over 21 years now, I feel the assessment that most of the job-related stress comes from within is accurate. Whether it is self-imposed (perceived) or real, most who want to perform at a high level impose levels of stress upon themselves which others, who are average performers, do not experience. In addition, some decisions and directions made by command can cause internal stress for those who resist change.

      Frank

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        ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

        I absolutely agree! The self induced stress is through the roof in most agencies I think. There are so many variable within the job it really takes effort to not stress yourself over what are minor details in hind sight.

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          Jarvis Mayfield

          I agree but the most stressful part of an officers job is what takes place inside the police department. The internal stress is very hard to deal with for so many people. Management must see the stress and address it before it destroys the department

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      Joey Prevost

      I'm afraid I wasn't surprised. I have watched relationships change dynamics throughout the years at my agency. I've heard it said, "you get here and are friends with everyone, by the time you leave you hate everybody." It is unfortunate, but I think fixable.

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    Kyle Turner

    I would personally be interested in getting more details about the conflict that is reported within a police department. Is it generally between officers or employees of the same rank or different ranks such as supervisor to subordinate? I think this would make a big difference in how it is approached as an organization. Generally, within my organization I have seen more stress come as a result of supervisors having high, even unreasonable, expectations of their subordinates. This results in conflict between ranks and additional stress for all involved. Referring back to the previous model, it would seem that these unreasonable expectations result in a supervisor using coercive stress to get short term results. As an organization, leadership could stress the importance of other forms of "power" to influence other's behavior which would benefit the organization because it would produce less stress, increased morale, and longer term results.

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      Brian Johnson

      Kyle, all your points are valid, but it has been my experience that the majority of workplace conflict involves a subordinate/supervisor relationship for the reasons you stated. However, an important part of leadership is holding everyone accountable, many times, rank and file, and supervisory personnel will not hold themselves accountable, which requires management intervention. The troops all know those that are not carrying their weight.

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      Chris Corbin

      I also have seen stress brought about by supervisors placing high, even unreasonable, expectations on their subordinates. The best way that I have found to ensure that I don't perpetuate this onto my folks is to follow Abrashoff's 3-step process when assigning tasks, which is to ensure that 1) the goals are clearly understood; 2) adequate resources are made available; and 3) the persons assigned the task are adequately trained. If any of these three are missing, stress and conflict are sure to follow.

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    Frank Acuna

    When dealing with conflict management within our organization, it is important to know the different attitudes that lead to conflict: Independent, Wounded, Bitter, Rebellious and Unrestorable. I have personally witnessed each of these attitudes by personnel in the workplace. With the exception of the Unrestorable Spirit, who is glad to be bitter and is likely not to change, there are courses of action that can set the others on a path to restoration. One remarkable approach to handling conflict is taking your own personal accountability in the matter as well as approaching conflict with a calm demeanor. When you speak with someone who cannot contain their emotions due to their perceived inequity, a calm tone can typically unconsciously make them lower their voice and calm down, if not just to listen to what you have to say.

    Frank

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      Monte Potier

      I agree with your comments about reaction with a calm demeanor. I have seen it work several times, not only in the workplace, but also on the street. If we take out the "ego" portion many conflicts can be resolved, sometimes before they start.

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      Nancy Franklin

      Frank, I think you nailed it to talk about the importance of taking personal accountability. We don't have a superpower to change others, but we do have complete control over our own response and emotions to conflict. Giving others space to talk about perceived or real inequity goes a long way to building rapport and trust because it lets that person know that you care enough to listen. Sometimes that is all someone needs to move past an issue.

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        Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

        Nancy I couldn't agree with you more. In my department I have found that allowing people the opportunity to talk has done a lot to build respect and trust. And yes, sometimes they just want to know that you do care enough to just listen.

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      Travis Linskens

      I agree, Frank. Approaching things with a calm tone greatly impacts the outcome with an emotionally charged individual. I find that not immediately responding to a person like that and allowing the situation to settle before trying to change something (when you're able to anyway) is extremely helpful as well.

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    Brian Johnson

    This module reminds me of my undergraduate studies at CSULB. I was a criminal justice major and conducted a research paper on stress in law enforcement. I created a questionnaire for police officers to fill out and return back to me for my research paper. I still recall how the majority of the responses attributed their stress to internal issues within their department. I came down to a lack of trust by the rank and file with their supervisors and command staff. The survey was completed by two police departments and a local Sheriff's substation. Admittedly, it was not a scientific study, but the same leadership challenges over 30+ years ago are still affecting our profession today. I found the conflict management strategy (10% acceptance) to be a very effective strategy. Most reasonable people would agree that they have some amount of ownership in workplace conflict. Look forward to actually using this strategy in the workplace. The four character traits will also help you to work through our own personal conflict in the workplace-personal growth is optional!

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    Monte Potier

    The lecturer is "dead on" with the comment about the #1 stress in Law Enforcement is from Internal. From the beginning a new officer is told of all the dangers of the suspect, however very little training is dedicated about the stress from with in the agency. That stress comes from immediate supervisors all the way up to the chief. I believe more training in the area from the agency may help eliminate some of the conflicts before they start.

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    Joey Prevost

    I liked the conflict resolution strategy in this module. If you can get each party to look inward and accept a small amount of the blame then forgiveness should be forthcoming. In learning about the 5 Attitudes I have to say you can't always terminate the Unrestorable Spirit. In a Civil Service Environment an act has to be pretty serious to rise to that level. When this person is placed where they have minimal impact as the lecture suggests, it doesn't always send the best message to the rest of the organization.

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      Jason Porter

      The conflict resolution strategy seems too simple. But as they always say, use the KISS method. With each agreeing to take some blame, the conflict is resolved. Even though I am not civil service, during the module when that was mentioned, I thought about the civil service side and thought getting rid of that person was easier said than done.

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      Magda Fernandez

      Joey, I agree with your statement of not placing a person where they have minimal impact sends the wrong message to the members of the department. I also don’t believe in finding ways to terminate a person because they are an “unrestored spirit”. At least at my agency it would require a lot of documentation and progressive discipline or a gross violation of law or policy for termination to be recommended. Every effort would be made to work with this person. Fortunately, we don’t have people like that for now at the department.

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      Lance Leblanc

      I agree Joey, the best part of the lecture for me was the conflict resolution strategy. Seeing how that worked made good sense. Most people don't like to being in a conflict because of the internal stress it causes.

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        Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

        I agree with you Joey, but I would like to add if we can use god conflict management skills when dealing with our conflicts, we can minimize our internal stress.

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    Jason Porter

    Conflict in law enforcement. I was surprised to hear that most of the conflict for a law enforcement professional lies internally. I can’t say that I see that in my department or at least in my division. I guess there could be some perceived conflict or felt conflict that just has not reared it’s head yet. This was an interesting module, it will open my eyes to look for things other than the outright physical or verbal conflict that we mostly are used to.

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      Drauzin Kinler

      Jason, I have experience that perceived conflict is usually related to the lack of communication. Most of the time this doesn’t occur on a shift if the leaders are effective communicators and speak to their personnel. As I noted in my post, I regularly speak with employees of our organization and the perceived conflict is real. After providing truthful information about things that I am aware of, the employee is normally satisfied and the conflict is resolved.

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      Jarod Primicerio

      It is sometimes surprising that the majority of conflict is internal within our agencies. It is extremely unfortunate and sometimes surprising. I feel that as a manager, we create an open and safe environment, but not always seeing it from the subordinates perspective.

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    Nancy Franklin

    Dealing with conflict, whether in the work place or in our personal lives, is rarely something that anyone looks forward to. As discussed in this module, it is important to understand where conflict comes from and the attitudes that allow conflict to persist. Deescalating conflict and working to resolve issues takes emotional intelligence and the ability for one to remove their personal emotions and expectations from the equation. It is important, especially as a supervisor, to manage conflict and not allow it to fester within your organization, because the attitudes that result from unresolved conflict are carcinogenic and can easily lead to unrestorable attitudes as discussed in this module. As supervisors, we must work hard to continually guide our personnel to remain under the umbrella of our organization's expectations and the respect that we owe one another as we all navigate through the stressful and difficult career of law enforcement. We must work to turn the tide on the stressors that effect our employees so we move further away from creating or allowing internal stressors to impact our organizations.

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      Dan Wolff

      Nancy Franklin,

      Absolutely we never look forward to conflict and at times I’ve seen they tend to ignore it and just hope it works itself out. As a 3rd party when the conflict is seen or heard, you hear the “it’s not my problem” saying. I will intervene when I see it but not get involved in the logistics of the conflict if it doesn’t concern me but into the personal solution of how to come to an agreement of the two parties. I guess you could say I play mediator, trying to ensure everyone gets along in our organization is priority because we are a team. Again, just as you said, meet our stressors head on and not allow internal stressors affect the organization.

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    Dan Wolff

    Conflict management whether perceived, felt or real is seen in law enforcement on a regular basis. How it is dealt with unfortunately, is to ignore and it will just go away. Or, there are grudges that are held within and unfortunately are seen from a 3rd party and they just watch of how they play out, instead of intervening. If everyone within the organization identified with the 5 attitudes, 4 conflict maxims and paths to restoration, we might have a better understanding in handling these conflicts. Most conflicts are controlled by an “ego, but if they would step back with a tad of humility instead, follow these guidelines, our inner organization conflicts would possibly decrease. Until we take a stand to deal with conflict head on, it will be the norm to just turn a blind eye like I have seen so many times.

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    Drauzin Kinler

    The lecture by Sheriff Nash mentioning that the stressors in the law enforcement profession is caused from internal conflict is 100% correct. During my law enforcement career, I have only noted a few external incidents that really affected the officer’s involved. Perceived conflict, however, is rampage in this profession. When speaking with officer’s it is amazing to learn of the perceived conflict that they feel is happening to them. I have resolved many of these instances by just providing effective communication. It is my belief that because we don’t provide effective communication regularly in our organizations that rumors and misleading information flows throughout causing much of the perceived conflict. I have experience this myself and learned that by simply speaking with the other party and listening to what they have to say usually resolves the conflict. Sheriff Nash mentioned the 10% fault strategy in the lecture and although it is a simple approach I believe it would work. The only problem that you run into is if your organization provides some of the other leadership training to their employees. Our agency requires leadership training in order to advance, so most of the personnel within the agency have seen the lecture with Sheriff Nash and know about the 10% fault strategy.

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    Jarod Primicerio

    This module on conflict management and identification is crucial. We, as law enforcement leaders, must recognize the root cause of internal personnel conflicts, identify the attitudes and have an idea of how to possibly resolve the issues. It was also important that we self-reflect to identify if we are part of the problem. Often, I have seen the management refuse to take responsibility and then attempt to fix the problems they've created. The component discussing the path of restoration is helpful not only professionally, but in our personal lives.

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    Magda Fernandez

    Conflict has always existed; it will always exist. How it is dealt with will be the game changer. There are varying degrees of conflict what we will see and for some using the conflict management strategy may work. For others will require looking deeper into the root of the true problem and dealing with it from there. Having relationships with people, listening and using emotional intelligence is always key when dealing with sensitive issues and conflict. Patience and understanding goes a long way too. Although its no surprise, I do find it interesting that internal conflict is the biggest stressors for police officers. I also find it interesting they are hired to deal with conflict on the street daily. Most are great negotiators and can find resolutions to most conflict peacefully. They diffuse situations and communicate well with the angriest of citizens and de-escalate incidents successfully. I suppose because there are degrees of separation when they are on the street it may be easier to do and the conflict they have to deal with internally is personal to them creates a different level and type of stress.

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    Mike Brown

    I recognized that internal conflict was a big part of stress in my department. There has always been individuals in my department who appeared to strive in creating conflict with others and rejoicing in the madness they created. It was as if they lived off of the emotions that were generated from confusing. Alot of what I took from this section described the Bitter/rebellious spirit. Mad, angry yet assigning fault for the issues intentionally created.

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      Chasity Arwood

      Mike, i agree with you. There are a small amount of people that cause issues for the entire department. They blame others for issues they created never taking responsibility themselves.

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      David Cupit

      I agree with your point on the video. I know a lot of bitter and rebellious spirited people in my agency. I also have been around people in other organizations that were complaining about the unfair stuff that goes on in their agency.

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      Brian Lewis

      I've witness the same in my agency. The silver lining for my department is a lot of these bitter, wounded, and rebellious spirits are close to retirement. I just hope we can change the culture so that our younger officers do not take their place once they are gone.

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      Laurie Mecum

      You are right Mike, I believe every organization have those people that are truly not happy unless there is conflict. There are people that are miserable therefore, want to make others miserable with them. Those are the same people that most likely would never take 10% of the blame to resolve a situation.

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      Lt. Mark Lyons

      We have the same issues at our agency. When I began my career in law enforcement, I never would have imagined that my biggest source of stress and conflict would be with the agency I worked for or my fellow officers. Unfortunately, that has been somewhat of a reality.

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    Lance Leblanc

    Internal conflict has created more issues in our department than anything else. We have officers who leak information to the media just to cause disarray. Officers will have members of the media to do public information requests about internal memos which contains nothing. In our department, we are in the process of a leader change and the suck-ups who got jobs they didn't deserve are now bitter/rebellious spirits.

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      Judith Estorge

      I agree, there is a clique in every organization and it changes with each new leader. Officers not in the current clique so often feel slighted and looked over. It is human nature to want to be included and part of the culture.

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    Chasity Arwood

    The lecture is correct, most of the stress on law enforcement officers comes from internal conflict. I have witnessed this many times at my department. Some officers within our department believe they are entitled to certain information when in fact they are not. Several officers have sent public records request to attempt to find out information. When the information requested is found to be privileged, then rumors are started among the lower ranking officers. A small group of disgruntled employees can cause serious internal issues if it is not addressed by the administration.

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    David Cupit

    This lecture was good i enjoyed learning more about dealing with conflicts. I know in my case i have my office conflicts carry over to my family life. I have found that when officers come to work with bad attitudes, i will ask them if every thing is alright at home and they will advise they are having a conflict at home. I am excited about trying this conflict management exercise in real life.

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      Henry Dominguez

      Yes I agree, very good lecture on breaking it down in identifying conflicts. But like you I do sometimes let these conflicts carry over into my family life but mostly venting about how to deal with them. It is very difficult to deal with peoples conflicts that are in their personal life spilling into work or as you said bringing the bad attitude to work. This exercise gives me a different way of approaching it,

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      Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

      I agree, allowing yourself to open up and listen to the officers needs will also build a strong bond of trust. I have experienced sometimes just letting someone vent in a safe neutral place prevents exposing a negative atmosphere for others.

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      Kyle Phillips

      You are not alone in allowing work related conflict to spill into your personal life. I think at any point, we have all dealt with someone who is carrying that weight, or have been the one spoiling the milk. Having a supervisor or peer hold us accountable and offer a resolution is generally what is needed to refocus and move forward.

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    Brian Lewis

    I enjoyed learning about the 5 attitudes leading to conflict. This module helped me identify certain subordinates that project these types of attitudes. The path of restoration will hopefully guide me in handling these different spirits. The conflict management strategy proposed by Sheriff Nash is pretty touchy feely for law enforcement and might be difficult for veteran supervisors/management to attempt with conflicting subordinates. However, if it achieves the intended goal of conflict resolution, I'd be willing to try it.

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    Henry Dominguez

    I think the video is right on about the internal conflicts. I like the break down and defining each of the 5 attitudes that generate conflict. He really hits it when he says that we also need to look at ourselves to see if the problem is us and to really evaluate ourselves to see if we are any of these attitudes. I think defining the attitudes helps to identify what you might be dealing with in different people or to see and recognized where someone might be and to prevent it from escalating. This would be a time for us to defuse a situation because that is ultimately our goal. Stop a cancer from getting worse or spreading.

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    Judith Estorge

    Not surprising that maxim # 1 explains that most L.E. stress comes from internal, not external influences. There is so much disgruntlement within our agency with many officers believing any other method is better except the one in practice. Officers focus on the negatives instead of the positives all too often. Perceived injustices are frequently incorrect and spread like wildfire in the rumor mill.

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      Clint Patterson

      We spend more time with our coworkers, then our own families sometimes. This leads to no surprise that maxim #1 is so true. We can best describe it as a “rollercoaster of emotions,” we have our ups and downs. We must learn how to manage it because we all count on each other at the end of the day.

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    Clint Patterson

    This was my favorite topic discussed so far, because this can lead to destruction in so many ways. We as humans typically shy away from resolving conflicts, whether they are work-related, spouse related, or family-related. We sometimes act like we owe the conflict money, but don’t want to pay our debt, so we avoid dealing with it. I have personally formed dislikes toward other subordinates and supervisors, just based on perceived conflict. I later identified that my perception was invalid, and we “squashed the issues.” I think the strategy for conflict resolution is ingenious, and I will put it in my tool bag.

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      Christian Johnson

      I agree, Clint.

      I believe that miscommunication and wrong perceptions lead to most of the conflict we deal with.

      After this module, we can easily deal with those, and more fact-based conflicts.

      I gained quite a lot with this one.

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    Laurie Mecum

    Internal Conflicts is an issue most people do not want to face. They can deal with the conflicts on the street but not their own. Listening to Sheriff Nash’s lecture, I can think of several bitter and rebellious people in our agency. The strategy he explained seems to be a great strategy, however, you would have a hard time getting some of the bitter people to except any blame.

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      David Ehrmann

      Yes. There are conflicts within our organization that have lasted for years. Newer employees don’t even know about some of those conflicts because they happened decades ago. If these people would get together and wipe the slate clean, it would create a better work environment for all parties involved.

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      Samantha Reps

      I agree that internal conflict is one issue that people go out of their way not to face. It is sad that dealing with strangers on the streets is better in someone's mind rather than dealing with their own brothers and sisters in the agency.

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    Amanda Pertuis

    Conflict Management training is something that should added to in-service. I think it’s something that most people fail out because it’s easier to just let continue and fester. The Path of Restoration steps gave good insight on how to work on managing conflict. I like the Integrity Check and the management strategy seems that it could be effective.

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      Samuel Lucia

      Agreed Amanda. To add to that, management is often culpable for certain conflicts, because we fail to address them.

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      Royce Starring

      I agree conflict management should be implemented in-service but also should be a requirement of all supervisors.

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      Donnie

      I would agree with that. Often times we are friends with the people we work with. We usually try to ignore things that offend or working relationship. But they get tucked away in the back of mind and fester. It’s best to address them right away and this module gave us tools to do that; even a pretty good strategy at the end.

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    David Ehrmann

    The five attitudes leading to conflict explained by Sheriff Nash was the most interesting that I found. When he was explaining each of the spirts, I was thinking about individuals within my agency and placing them into each category. What is most interesting is that each of the spirits can be restored, except for the unrestored spirit, if leaders were to put some time into helping restore that spirit. We can all identify someone in each category, but we should also do some self-reflection to see what we as leaders can do to help them along their path.

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    Samuel Lucia

    We've all been involved in multiple conflict management situations in our personal and professional lives. Sheriff Nash's conflict management strategy is so simple yet powerful. Can wait to use it.

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    Royce Starring

    I found that the five attitudes interesting. I have either worked with people or for people that fit in each of the different types of attitude. The way that the lesson describes each one was like he knew the people that i worked with.

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      Roanne Sampson

      Some conflicts can lasts for many years and might never be resolved. I can also point out people who have these types of attitudes as well.

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      Lieutenant John Champagne

      I have seen almost all types also and feel like the Bitter Spirit tends to be older senior officers that may have been overlooked for a position. I remember 22 years ago as a rookie coming across those disgruntled older guys.

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        wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

        I agree, over my 20yr career older officers were stuck in their ways and refused to promote change, it caused conflict.

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    Roanne Sampson

    I learned the three types of conflict consist of perceived, felt and real. People enter law enforcement with their own expectations. When those expectations are not reached and the real world sets in, this can cause issues in relationships. There are so many conflicts that's been in existence for many years. Forgiveness is key to resolving the conflict, but sometimes egos can get in the way.

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    Christian Johnson

    I am taking a LOT away from this module.

    As I'm sure most of us did, I identified several people that fit into each category. I thought of one that fit into the last, but he has been gone for some time. I don't know anyone else I would consider a lost cause.

    I simply cannot wait for the opportunity to try the resolution method he details at the end!

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      Lance Landry

      Christian I felt the same way. Almost to the point of excitement, I await the clash of two personalities so I can test this new tool set.

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      dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

      Very true. there was alot of people i was placing into each group. And cant wait to try this approach to resolve conflict.

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      Agreed with all leaders that could identify someone they have encountered with these conflict ideologies. While 4 of 5 conflicts can be saved/reversed, we all hope co-workers can be "shown the light". We all want each other to succeed, we want to help our coworkers that NEED help. There can only be healing when we can identify things to help repair. We need to lead by example and engage others often for positive reasons. Any agency can benefit from better dialogues all around.

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    Rocco Dominic, III

    I enjoyed Sheriff Nash's strategy on resolving conflict by getting each person to accept partial blame, while still asking and accepting the other person for forgiveness. Also while he was discussing the different types of spirits, I was thinking of the people I work with who fit into that category.

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      Burke

      I'm not sure if his strategy of partial acceptance would work all of the time. I believe over the years officers would catch on to this tactic. I also started picturing every deputy that fit the different spirits discussed.

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    mmcnab@spokanepolice.org

    “I am a Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPAC) evaluator and am testing the system”

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    Burke

    The different spirits discussed in this module really hit home for me. I could picture a particular deputy for every spirit listed and how it accurately described them. It gave me a lot of perspective on how I should handle these types of people and how they perceive conflict.

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    Lance Landry

    In a leadership role, we must be willing to resolve conflict amongst employees. Sheriff Nash’s three question conflict management strategy was quite interesting. Accepting responsibility for one’s own fault, accepting forgiveness, and giving forgiveness were simple incorporated into his three questions. When both parties invest in that responsibility the conflict gets resolved. I will definitely attempt to use this strategy in my next conflict management.

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      Major Stacy Fortenberry

      Its worth a try. I'm not sure if I would use his exact language but will try something similar in a low grade conflict and see if I can pull it off.

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      Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

      I agree that we not only have to be willing to resolve conflict outside of the department, but also within our agencies to manage the internal stressors. I also will be looking for an opportunity to utilize this 10% strategy in the community and workplace alike...I do not however believe I will attempt this one with my significant other though!

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    Donnie

    I agree with Sheriff Nash that most stress comes from within the agency. The demand for working for an elected official can bring great fear in job security. It’s hard to keep up with what seems like very demanding policies, rules, and standards. The time allotment to meet them really isn’t there. This is what I believe contributes to these stressors. However, if we look to our internal selves, we may find that we aren’t managing our own time with the greatest efficiency which could reduce the stress. A lot of times the stress causes us to lash out. If we are responsible for our own character, we’ll catch it on the spot and correct it. If not, now we are at odds with others over something that is usually frivolous.

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      cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

      I agree that stress makes us lash out on people for the smallest things. I think we can all manage our time much better and think before we speak. If we all could do this there would be fewer conflicts in our lives.

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    McKinney

    This module allowed me to see the five different attitudes leading to conflict. I unknowing until now have experienced all these behaviors in others throughout my professional career, and these negative outlooks can affect the morale of others quickly. I enjoyed the lecture points on how we can manage those personalities to ensure that harmony is occurring through our work place.

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    Major Stacy Fortenberry

    I have never thought about the attitudes that cause interior conflict in such a linear fashion. It helps to add definitions to the attitudes. It makes it easier for me to differentiate and form an action plan to deal with the conflict attitudes and hopefully bring the member back into the fold before it is to late. The bitter spirit attracting others sure was true. Misery loves company.

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      michael-beck@lpso.net

      In speaking of misery loving company, I really like the way Sheriff Nash brought up the group of women who were overhead by his daughter. It really made me think about some of these types of gatherings at work. I know I have participated in them, probably most of us have, but now knowing how they come about, maybe we can do something to make them positive rather than feeding the negative beast.

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    cbeaman@ascensionsheriff.com

    Most stress in law enforcement is internal. I liked the Sheriff’s way of resolving a conflict. Getting both parties to take 10 percent of the blame. I think this is a good way of getting people to start a civil conversation on the path to forgiveness. It is hard for law enforcement officers to say I forgive you. It often takes a good leader to bring them together and start the process.

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      jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

      I found the way Sheriff Nash explained the 10 percent blame strategy to be extremely insightful. With each person taking a portion of the blame, acknowledging a portion of the blame and then asking for forgiveness seems like a great way to resolve conflict. The tactic of not allowing each person to use the 10 percent blame when asking for forgiveness from the other person. Allows both individuals the freedom to accept the apology from the other person.

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        sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

        i found that strategy as brilliant, especially once the blame is accepted by all and the conflict is over. The 80% of the conflict is completely forgotten about. Makes one wonder how important are the internal conflicts within an Agency.

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        McKinney

        I agree with Sheriff Nash’s strategy in owning and dividing blame. This seems to be a diplomatic approach if you are dealing with employees that are casting judgment against each other. I am fortunate that the team I serve with will recognize fault and work through the issues for a positive resolution. If and when I encounter opposition between team members, I will incorporate the concept.

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    Lieutenant John Champagne

    It was interesting to see that most law enforcement stress comes from within the agency; I do see the internal issues, but due to the nature of the job, I figured most stress would come from outside influence. The 10% concept makes sense, and I believe once you get both parties to assume some responsibility to the conflict, it is much easier to manage or resolve. I will utilize this concept in the future.

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      chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

      I agree with your response, taking accountability would help you manage so many things. Learning the different conflicts when it comes to managing will help the department as a whole.

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      mtroscla@tulane.edu

      It's like sales, but for an idea. In a sense you're getting them to buy a portion of the fault.

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    jbanet@bossiersheriff.com

    Managing conflict is a dilemma that every leader will ultimately face. I enjoyed the way Sheriff Nash presented the material of instruction by adding a personal touch. Most of the conflict I have dealt with so far in my career have usually fallen into the Perceived conflict category. Most people perceive there is a conflict without even learning the facts. Keeping open lines of communication is crucial for me in helping resolve these perceived conflicts. This coincided with one of the ways of managing conflict which was "don't run on assumption." Going forward in the future I will use the 5 different types of attitudes leading to conflict to help me identify the different spirits of conflict.

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      I agree that the perceived conflict is very prevalent. I have honestly seen myself fall into this category more than once. Thankfully I have matured and learned to slow down and look at a situation for the other person's perspective. I also believe the lack of body language and tone in emails, texts, and other social media often contributes to the mistakes of assumption.

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        anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

        I agree communication through electronic devices can sometimes contribute to conflicts. Being leaders we should always communicate face to resolve any issues

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    chasity.sanford@stjohnsheriff.org

    In module 6, Conflict Management knowing that in the law enforcement environment internal conflict is the perceived stressor. Sheriff Nash explained this module so well, from giving the strategies, tips and maxims. The path to restoration is what every law enforcement agency needs to resolve all conflict.

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      cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

      I agree, restoration is what is needed. If we can work on our relationship as officers we can only better serve the communities that we are here to protect.

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    It was interesting to consider that a majority of stress in this profession is internal. While i have had many discussions about stress and the handling of stress in the Law Enforcement Career, this module really drove home the idea that the internal conflicts are the most long lasting and need to be addressed. There is a push for courses on De-Escalation in today's law enforcement culture. I fear that too much of that is focused only on external conflict and not enough of internal. Sometimes the aggression or frustration that officers are accused of taking out on suspects could actually be the product of internal stress. I have certainly seen and can identify fellow officers with all 5 attitudes that lead to Conflict.

    The maxims of conflicts rarely being resolved so they must be managed is so true, yet ignored. Very seldom do two people who despise each other talk for 10 or 15 minutes and solve all the world's problems. One doesn't negotiate with a terrorist thinking we will change years or even a lifetime of beliefs in a conversation or even a day. With this realization, we can always work at improving but have to realize that managing the situation is the prudent course of action.

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    sid.triche@stjohnsheriff.org

    This was a great module, from learning the 4 maxims, the 3 types of Conflicts to the examples of the different levels of attitude an employee can reach. All great information on their own, but learning the path to restoration and the 3 steps of Conflict Management Strategy was simple and impressive. Definitely will added to my toolbox when dealing with internal and external conflict.

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    mtroscla@tulane.edu

    Looking at conflict resolution from another angle, how much could a department save every year if they had effective conflict identification and resolution practices in place? How many man hours saved? I suspect it would be significant, one internal investigation, even a minor complaint takes one of my supervisors several days to investigate and document, even cutting a few of these out a year would be worth it.

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      guttuso_fa@jpso.com

      Very good point. It would be interesting to see the money and hours saved if this was to become the norm.

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    michael-beck@lpso.net

    During the part on the Attitudes Leading to Conflict, I began to start thinking about the people with whom I have worked and those who have and still work for me. I started saying this one fits this profile, that one here, and was trying to formulate a plan of how to salvage them. As I thought more on it, I found myself thinking about how I fit into these attitudes. I began to realize I traveled down the road almost to the point of being a rebellious spirit.

    Often in management we just label these employees are complainers or disgruntled. There may be merit behind their gripes but most of the time they just bring us problems with no solutions, so we avoid them. I believe sometimes this avoidance lends to them also traveling down this path farther and farther. I know I had a rough time getting out of the hole into which I was digging myself, and I still have a little way to go, but by learning some of the management strategies and applying them, hopefully we can save these employees.

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      cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

      It is interesting on how you mentioned that "there may be merit behind their gripes but most of time with no solutions so we avoid them". That is very insightful!

      One of the ways my current supervisor began to help develop me is when I present a problem to him, he instructs me to propose at least one practical solution. He does the same for many of the others who he oversees.

      I have noticed that this helped to cause a shift in my perception, self-confidence and productivity. I used to dread to be the bearer of bad news. Now I don't mind going to him because I feel like I can be part of the solution.

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    guttuso_fa@jpso.com

    I enjoyed this module. I never realized it until watching this how much more I hear deputies complain about work and co-workers than doing their job. I am interested in trying to use the conflict management strategy to see what kind of success I would have with it. Still a little skeptical on that it would work on all conflicts.

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    cody.hoormann@stjamessheriff.com

    I never really paid attention to internal conflicts as them being the greater stress in an officers life. After listening to everything in the module it makes perfect sense. We learn to deal with the issues that we see on a daily basis out in the world. If we can manage the conflicts with our co-workers them that will only help us do our jobs better and make the organization look better.

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      Adam Gonzalez

      Absolutely agreed! If you notice from my post, I touch upon much of what you say here. Once we understand and adhere to the finer details of conflict management within our own sphere of communication and influence, venturing out into the world and helping others becomes much more understandable, relatable and service oriented!

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    As we look at Conflict Management, it is different for us as leaders and managers. We have to make sure that we heal our past relationships at whatever cost so we can be fair, firm, and consistent.
    I agree with this maximum that we must manage department conflict, and attempt to help those broken relationships. If we can not get them resolved, managing it is a must to maintain peace inside the agency.
    I can not wait to try the conflict management theory presented in this lecture. If this really works like they say, this could not only heal broken relationships, but improve agency morale.

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    Lieutenant Dustin Jenkins

    Conflict Management can sum up a great portion of the jobs we do in our community on a daily basis. It startled me to hear that we are stressed more due to internal conflict, and then I thought about it and realized how true it was. How can we allow the extra stress from within to continue to manifest, when our jobs for the most part consist of regular conflict management. We must do our part to resolve or manage the internal conflicts so as they do not adversely effect the atmosphere of the agency. The knowledge presented to us through this lesson should be a good start at resolving and managing the different maxims within our agency.

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      dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

      It's crazy to think of the stress the job has and how much we continue to conjure up ourselves. I have to do a better job myself of recognizing internal conflicts, especially now that it seems as though they are better hidden from me being a Lieutenant. I know my guys and girls will talk more openly about conflicts with each other to the Sergeant, feeling that I shouldn't be bothered with them.

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    anthony.joseph@stjamessheriff.com

    This lesson has taught me that most conflicts can easily be resolved, by understanding the types of conflicts and how to communicate through them can help resolve them.

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    ereeves@cityofwetumpka.com

    I have seen several instances of perceived conflict. Especially younger officers often feel like their supervisor doesn't like them. They stress over it and most times they feel this way only because the supervisor is correcting them and trying to teach them to do the job correctly. Also, the spirits section was spot on. These individuals can bring down an entire organization in a short amount of time.

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      steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

      I agree about the spirits....why I feel it is so important to try and solve the spirit before it progresses to rebellious unnrestore-able. I see too many times some leaders ignore, hoping it will go away because they are afraid of the conflict themselves.

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    steven.brignac@stjamessheriff.com

    Very great segment and is one of the most desired skill I think a leader should have. So nice to resolve conflicts and prevent one party from separating from the organization because of leaders not wanting to assist in the resolution. Retainment is so much more valuable than recruitment.

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    As leaders in law enforcement, a large portion of our jobs revolves around conflict management. Sheriff Nash's statement about a large amount of our stress coming from inside the agency is 100 percent accurate. We have all experienced it at one time in our career or have witnessed a co-worker experience the internal stress. The way Sheriff Nash broke down the three types of conflict and the five attitudes that lead to conflict was very beneficial. As leaders, we need to start identifying and addressing the internal stressors faster to ensure a more productive work environment.

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      dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

      One problem some officers have is that they do not deal with conflict at all. Some leaders hope the issue will resolve itself or act like they aren’t aware an issue exists. Then when the issue spirals out of control, it is harder for the leader to manage or resolve the problem.

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    I knew from past experience how much officers complained about their internal conflict, I did not realize how much I have, over the years. It is true, conflict has to be managed. I know that I have people that hold grudges against me for things that are decades old, on and off the job. I have a family member that will not speak to me to this day not because of something I did, but something my father, not to them but their father when we were around 3 or 4 years old. As for on the job, I know people that hold grudges against me and there are people that I still hold grudges against. This is something that I am still working on in my own personal development.

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    dpertuis@stcharlessheriff.org

    Like most others, I began labeling people in my organization while listening to Sheriff Nash speak of the 5 attitudes leading to conflict. I agree that the Unrestorable Spirits are few and far between, however, they are out there. I have personally watched someone like this destroy divisions, commanders, and attempt to destroy careers. Mostly because leaders didn't have the knowledge to deal with them. The biggest problem I see is when they are put into supervisory roles, by default or carelessness and now they have the ability to influence people under there command.

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      blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

      I bet we have placed the same people in these categories. I have noticed there are not as many "un-restored spirits" as they use to have in the department. I agree with you that those supervisors were put in those spots by default. I believe that once the majority of supervisors in the department know how to deal with these conflicts, it will give the department a better work environment.

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    blaurent@stcharlessheriff.org

    In law enforcement, there will always be some internal conflict. Most police officers are strong will, stubborn, and still have to be right all the time. As leaders, it is essential to be aware that there is a conflict and either resolve or manage it. I have witnessed people with an "un-restored spirit" bring down many of the people that surround them. When that said person retired, everyone was relieved. That person's supervisor knew about the conflict, but I don't think he knew how to solve the conflict or manage it.

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      clouatre_kj@jpso.com

      I agree on the difficulties of dealing with police and we being strong willed and stubborn. Although most issues should be easily solved, only if people's perceptions of others' thoughts wouldn't get in the way. If communication was frequent, or at least early on during the conflict, I do believe most of these problems can dissolve. It does take a strong leader to confront these problems early and head on.

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    dgros@stcharlessheriff.org

    Officer attitudes can strengthen or destroy an organizations morale. In my agency, we have several young officers, especially in Patrol. These young officers are very interested in doing a good job and genuinely love what they are doing. The phrase people do not leave bad companies they leave bad bosses is very true. Young officers, especially those who have not had this much direction in their life, are easily swayed by officers who display the toxic traits as explained in the officer attitudes. These young officers have nothing vested in remaining in a position that they feel is undesirable, so they move on. This loss of a potentially good employee is the result of their beliefs that this is the culture of the entire agency. When, in fact, the problem was with one or more people and a leader’s inability to resolve the issue.

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      dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

      Darren, I absolutely agree with you. It's amazing how one or two toxic employees can spread that toxicity across an entire shift, or division. Good officers have fallen by the wayside because of supervisors failing to recognize the effects these troubled employees cause.

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    cvillere@stcharlessheriff.org

    I found Sheriff's Nash lecture on the five attitudes leading to conflict and the path to restoration very interesting. So much of what we do deals with communicating with each other; whether it is written, verbal or body language we communicate many intentional and unintentional messages constantly. I reflect on times when I have mistakenly perceived some type of conflict based on the signals i received from someone else, only to find out that the other person never perceived any real conflict and that I just misinterpreted the message.

    Additionally, I reflect on some individuals I have worked with that were once faithful employees who somehow became one of the five attitudes Sheriff Nash mentioned at some point. In some, it seemed like a progression from independent to wounded, from wounded to bitter and bitter to rebellious. I wish we would have had the knowledge and skills then to help restore them. Some had a tremendous amount of skills and knowledge and were pretty far along in their careers. Hopefully, we can use these paths to restoration to work towards restoring attitudes/spirits and inspire coworkers once again to join us in fulfilling our collective vision.

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      In the past, I witnessed some employees that possessed one or more of the five attitudes. I wish that we had the knowledge and skills to help them. I feel that if we knew how to properly address the conflict, it would have positively impacted our culture.

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    clouatre_kj@jpso.com

    After watching this module, I can clearly see that the majority of stress in our occupation is the internal stressors from within. I've witnessed internal conflict since day one on the job. I've seen very faithful employees become each of the spirits described. It is difficult to get control of this, as with my experience, most police officers are not very in touch or emotionally intelligent to recognize this, and I think most are unwilling to discuss issues to come to a resolution. But, as it seems my current job description is to handle conflict all day long, the conflict management strategy is certainly worth trying.

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      mmoscona@floodauthority.org

      I agree with you. I see and deal with the different spirits all the time mostly within my own agency. Now to try these strategies to achieve some conflict management within our organization.

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    In this module, Sheriff Nash shared four character qualities that will help manage and resolve stress within an agency. In my department, we are often faced with internal conflict. I will make sure that when we are dealing with a conflict within my department we used the qualities of obedience, forgiveness, meekness, and faithfulness to manage the conflict.

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    dlavergne@stcharlessheriff.org

    I think we all have encountered people within our organization that has possessed one of the five spirits mentioned. Besides the unrestorable spirit, I think if this training was presented to us earlier we as supervisors could've made a change in those people. I believe we might have been able to save some of these people from themselves.

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    Lt. Mark Lyons

    This training module was very informative. As the instructor began defining the different types of attitudes, I couldn't help thinking about some of the deputies I work with and what category they belonged to. Then, I began to wonder what category I belong to. I'm still trying to figure that one out.

    Overall I would say the information in this module was very accurate and will be beneficial for future training material. However, I was a little upset with the end of the module. I expected that more time and focus would be spent discussing conflict management strategies. In the end, I understand the message and agree with the method. I just thought the strategy was a pretty basic and common approach that is already used by most when it comes to managing conflicts.

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    dlevet@stcharlessheriff.org

    There was a lot of useful information in this module. The conflict resolution technique is very interesting. i think the biggest problem is going to be that some leaders do not know what is going on. So they are inept to the conflict that surrounds them and their people. And not knowing they can never try to manage the conflict therefore that person begins to slip down from independent to the unrestored categories.

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      You are 100% correct in that assessment. Many leaders do not feel that conflict resolution with their subordinates is their responsibility. They hide their head in the sand while hoping the problem either goes away or fixes it self. All it does is fester and begin growing new conflicts.

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    Wow, where to start with the amount of info we received. So many well laden points that Sheriff Nash has spoken about. The different personalities and conflict personalities are people we have and/or may encounter in our profession. People who are colleagues can help to make or break your organization when its positive or negative. Leaders and peers need to be filters and watchdogs to help root out these negative connotations. As co-workers, the need to build each other up and keep each other honest, filled with integrity, and passion to do your job are essential. Resolving conflict often and early as needed can change things to a positive light.

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    Adam Gonzalez

    Conflict management. Arguably the single most utilized tool we use as public safety professionals today. And, as shared by Sheriff Nash, perhaps we use conflict management more within the agency and team that we operate in our official capacity than in any other scenario. However, as also discussed by Sheriff Nash, this finer points of conflict management that we use among those with which we labor beside, those we supervise and those we answer to, are more sensitive and intricate for sure, and depending on which of these we are addressing, can be much more involving and challenging.

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    mmoscona@floodauthority.org

    I really liked this module because managing conflict what we do most but probably understand least. The ability to manage conflict is so important to our jobs. I particularly liked the Conflict Management Strategy and plan on trying it the next time I am called upon to resolve a conflict.

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    wdanielfield@ibervilleso.com

    This training module was very informative. As a leader, we hold our officers and personnel to a standard of performance and behavior. We as leaders do realize that conflicts are rarely resolved, therefore they must be managed.

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    Sadly, Sheriff Nash's commentary on law enforcement is spot on. We face all kinds of evils everyday while out in the field, yet our greatest adversaries are ourselves. There can be so much open hostility toward coworkers, supervisors even the Chief or Sheriff themselves. Being able to proactively work through the attitudes and use good conflict resolution is a must have skill nowadays. At any given time all of the five attitudes that lead to conflict can and will show themselves. As supervisors, we must be sensitive and in touch with our people to recognize they are occurring and look to end them before they dismantle your agency.

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      Lt. Marlon J Shuff

      I agree Jeff. Police officers are masters at resolving conflicts out on the street, but struggle when it comes to resolving conflict among those in our ranks.

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      I couldn’t agree with you more and we need strong leaders capable of shifting the perception…that it is not okay to tolerate conflict any longer. And to actually get rid of some supervisors that generate conflict. I am fortunate to work in a great organization, but I do see room for improvement. Sometimes our perceptions get so out of whack and we need great people to shine a light on reality and do it tactfully.

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      Ray Bonillas

      Jeffery,

      I could not agree with you more about our employees displaying so much hostility to others within the workplace. What is so ironic is that we send our officers out into our communities to deal with conflict management or resolution with total strangers. Yet, it is difficult for them to find it in their hearts to set the record straight. We must model the way and restore such relationships within our organization.

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      Eduardo Palomares

      Totally agree with you Lt. It is sad that some of our officers dealing with the evil on the streets feel more threatened by internal conflict. I have seen officers treat inmates or arrestees better than their co-workers. We have to proactively tackle these types of attitudes and recognize that this could have long lasting damaging effects at the individual and institutional level.

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    Lt. Richard Paul Oubre

    It is surprising how fast perceived conflict will make its way through a law enforcement agency. A lot of times it will start with rumors and grow, with little to no foundation of truth. I believe a lot of perceived conflicts can be avoided with effective communication. It is our responsibility as leaders to make sure these conflicts are addressed as soon as possible.

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      I 100% agree with your assessment that most conflicts start with rumors and that most not try to seek all of the information before forming opinions. What has always been more interesting to me is that we are dealing with law enforcement officers who try to get both sides of the story each and everyday when it comes to taking calls and reports but when it comes to something they are involved with only get one side of the story. If most obtained all of the information I think we would have less conflict.

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      Deputy Mitchell Gahler

      I also agree that conflict is started by rumors. Although I'm just as guilty and join in sometimes, I try to take it upon myself to avoid the conflict and step away from the situation if I'm aware that it will turn into a negative experience, or if my name gets involved in the rumor.

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    Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

    Conflict Management
    After this module, the biggest problem today is some leaders do not know what is happening in their divisions. There are leaders in my agency that are oblivious to what is going on and cannot figure out how to manage conflict of any sort. Even after discussing and presented with ideas on what should be done, it is still is a discarded matter because they refuse to listen.

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      Lt. Joseph C. Chevis

      I do agree, most rumors do start conflict. I feel that if they can grow up and act like adults , professionals most of the conflicts would never happen. And it is our responsibility to address these issues when they do.

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    Lt. Marlon J Shuff

    Sadly, I agree with Sheriff Nash's assessment that officers' work-related stress comes from internal relationships and not external factors. With the risks associated with this profession, this should not be the case.

    Additionally, the five attitudes that lead to conflict are certainly something that I have witnessed over the years within my agency. When they aren't dealt with appropriately, these officers can be cancerous and attempt to bring people down with them. Like cancer, they cannot be allowed to go untreated and must be dealt with accordingly.

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      Lt. Joseph Flavin

      With the work-related stress coming from primarily internal relationships and not external factors, it's important leaders keep their finger on the pulse of their agency. Once a person gets to the unrestored spirit, they need to be let go. That's not always as simple as just firing them but I agree that they need to be dealt with accordingly and not allowed to continue to go unchecked.

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    Captain Jessica Jo Troxclair

    This module was interesting with the explanation of the different spirits within an agency by Sheriff Ray Nash. I have experienced these spirits within the correctional division during my career. Listening to Sheriff Nash break down the attitudes and the four steps of restoration involves consistency from their leader. Leaders must spend time developing their team members. When the spirits come into play the leader has a better grasp on assisting them into restoration when effective communication is used.

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      Eduardo Palomares

      Good morning. I also found the explanation on the different spirits to be very interesting. Honestly, I have become the "bitter" spirit at one point in my career but my mentor helped me restore my spirt. Back then I did not know the about the path to restoration but my mentor did. It was because of his consistency I was able to break away from my bitterness. Currently, there are two very skilled officers under my command with a combination of wounded and bitter spirits. I have been working with them because I used to be in their shoes. After this lecture, I will be use better communication to assist them into restoration.

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    It is very sad but often times true that a majority of our law enforcement conflicts and stressors come from our agencies internal relationships as Sheriff Ray Nash mentions in this module. In addition it is also sad that rather than resolving the conflicts we end up managing the conflict. I think this is really disheartening but know that it is true the amount of time and energy that goes into conflict internally within our organizations is very time consuming.

    I am very interested to try some of the strategies outlined in this module for attempting to address conflict to see if we can resolve some of our issues internally.

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      Sergeant James Schueller

      I agree with you Sheriff, it is rather sad to see/know that a lot of time we are just managing conflict instead of solving it. That time and effort could be directed towards so many other things, but the fact that we have this module speaks on it being an issue in many agencies. When I go through these modules and see that kind of information, it makes me wish that so many more of the staff in my agency would take this same class and see where we could be doing so much better. It is encouraging to me though, that there is a core group now that will be future leaders that have, are, or will go through this course and hopefully be applying what is learned as we go forward.

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        A agree, many people spend far too much time "managing" conflict rather than solving it. There is often a deeper problem (PTSD, Anxiety, alcohol abuse,) that may be manifesting as a behavior (anger, short temper, etc.).

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        Sergeant Chad Blanchette

        I agree Jim. I do find some comfort in the fact that some of the changes that we are currently going through at RPD seem to be aligned with some of the principles being taught in this training. As much as I have complained about the extra work of going through this training, I really am getting a lot out of it and am also wondering if this training should be a requirement for not only our official leaders, but also the next generation of department leadership?

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      Marshall Carmouche

      Sheriff Jahner, I too think we cause ourselves too much stress. I am the commander of a division that I am the only male. Yes, I supervise all females. The largest challenge for me is to prevent some of them from completely destroying each other. I tell them often that as females I think they should be building each other up instead of tearing one another down. There is a lot of rumor that goes around. My subordinates know that rumors come to me to die. I let them know often that I do not entertain rumors. I too will employ some of Sheriff Nash's strategies to resolve/mamange internal conflict.

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    Deputy Mitchell Gahler

    This module was very informative and describes an area in leadership that is important to focus on whether as an authority figure or not. It's very important to discover the true meaning of being in the fight together. We all sometimes carry difference of opinion and treat situations differently, which may cause conflict. Sheriff Ray Nash described the, “Path of Restoration.” We need to keep our personal desires and egos in check and communicate effectively if issues arise. I find it very rewarding at our office that we are open to discussion with our subordinates and within our team members in order to resolve issues. Although there is sometimes disagreement, we always end up respecting each other in order to reach the same common goal. We also get together beyond work, sometimes with our families, or sometimes as a crew to promote positive energy and attitudes. Many crew members get together for a round of golf to decompress and indulge in communication beyond our work duties. I’m very fortunate to be surrounded by positive individuals who are not afraid to admit mistakes and apologize if they felt like they were out of line.

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    Lt. Joseph Flavin

    Sheriff Ray Nash did an excellent job of explaining conflict management. I was particularly interested when he discussed the 5 attitudes leading to conflict. As he was going through them I was thinking in my head of the people I have worked with in the past and who I know at other agencies and coming up with my own examples of each spirit. The character based model of the path to restoration did a good job of reinforcing the character attributes that can get you past the 5 attitudes leading to conflict. The next time there is conflict in my agency between two people I am going to use the conflict management strategy that he discussed at the end of the module.

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      Ryan Manguson

      The nice thing about the conflict resolution strategy noted in the end of the module is that it can be equally applied in the workplace or personal life. It is just an overall good life skill.

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      Gregory Hutchins

      As Nash discussed the five attitudes, people came to mind that I relate to each of the categories. At some point, I recognized what I was doing and had to step back. As I tried to pigeonhole people into a category, I found I was judging them and with my personal criteria on offense. Taking the step back made me reevaluate the situations and I found myself a contributor to many of those situations. Whether it was rebellious, wounded, bitter, or independent I myself have been down those roads. As an emerging leader, did I by default contribute to another person in assuming one of these characteristics?

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    Sergeant James Schueller

    I have long believed what Sheriff Nash opened with, that being that most Law Enforcement stress comes internally (although the last few months have really out that theory to the test...) Additionally, the four maxims discussed really do cover the "four corners" of conflict management. The last two (unfulfilled expectations and forgiveness) cover just about every situation and incident I have seen in my time in this job. I was actually surprised by Laura Mackler's short video segment with tips on managing conflict- She comes from Harvard business background yet all of what she spoke on directly applies to public safety, too. Going through the different spirits and the "Five Attitudes Leading to Conflict"section allowed me to think of people in my own organization- past and present- and assigning each to a person I have worked with brought the content home. Perhaps more telling was to see where I have been in some of those categories myself throughout my career. Lastly, I have used a modified version Sheriff Nash's conflict management strategy - not as well designed but similar in theory- so it was a nice conclusion to the module and its contents.

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    I found it very interesting how the five attitudes leading to conflict are not only tied intimately with the four maxims, but how each attitude really becomes the foundation to transitioning to the next attitude. This is very similar in the way types of conflict can transition from perception to reality. I have never heard conflict resolution referred to as a path to restoration, or the four qualities that are key to making it happen; obedience, meekness, forgiveness and faithfulness. Forgiveness is a huge part, but understanding that we need to be able to practice all of these principles is extraordinarily important when trying to resolve others’, and our own, conflicts.

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      Christopher Lowrie

      I agree with you Jacobson. You would think that resolving conflicts would be more complicated than just using four maxims. Breaking each one down leads one to believe than you can resolve conflict with only four maxims.

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    Ray Bonillas

    I was very interested in the Five Attitudes Leading to Conflict presented by Sheriff Nash. As he discussed each attitude, I could not help myself, but think of a current individual who is currently on Administrative leave for his actions. The individual was not selected for a high ranking position within the organization and has gone through the Five Attitudes Leading to Conflict. He did not need the organization anymore and built up walls of hostility and began blaming other people for his problems and circumstances. He became mad at everything to a point where he began to undermine authority. That is where we now stand and unfortunately as Sheriff Nash stated, you must terminate such employee. The lesson was very informative and I am sure that every organization has such an employee.

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      I related to Ray's comment and Sheriff Nash's statement about listening to the presentation and visually putting employees in each of the different attitudes. I find that staff who display these traits are tough to deal with unless they clearly cross a line that can be documented. Most of these officers, especially if they have progressed to the "Wounded Spirit", "Bitter Spirit" or "Rebellious Spirit", know exactly how close to the edge they can get without crossing over. Particularly frustrating are those times when you engage them about their behavior and they appear to be receptive to the conversation (at least to your face). You walk away feeling that you made a positive inroad only to learn later that they were shining you on. It is hard to use Sheriff Nash's forgiveness strategy on people who genuinely have no interest in anyone but themselves.

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      Robert Schei

      Nice post Ray, it is difficult to watch people in our organizations go down this path. Even when you pull them in and have honest conversations with them they typically deflect or will not take ownership. Over time they become more and more disillusioned and must be let go. Hard to understand and watch.

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    Kyle Phillips

    It was interesting to hear about the five attitudes that lead to conflict. within the last few years, our agency had an individual whom had been going through these stages for a long time. This did ultimately lead to a resignation. What Sheriff Nash stated about the un-restorable spirit was accurate, this particular individual was influenced by another deputy years prior who was a bitter spirit, eventually they travelled down the same rabbit hole and neither one of them are currently employed within our organization. If the initial virus spreader had been addressed the way Sheriff Nash suggested, it's possible that the damage could have been prevented and two careers could have been salvaged.

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      Sergeant Durand Ackman

      I also enjoyed listening to the 5 attitudes leading to conflict. I have seen a couple people go through this progression and I found myself remembering some of the things those people did as the presenter spoke. It would have been interesting to see if some of the methods they described in this training were used if it could have saved these folks careers.

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    In his presentation, Sheriff Nash hit on several key topics applicable to the law enforcement leader. The first, was the Maxim that most of our stress comes from inside the organization. I see shifts band together to solve a problem but when its concluded they break into clicks and the drama begins. The second, was the Maxim that conflicts are rarely resolved so they must be managed. It amazes me when officers bring up some perceived slight from the past when discussing the context of a new issue. I thought that the information about the 3 types of conflict was also important. I never really thought about the actual definitions. I think we all perceive possible conflict but professionals talk to the other person to resolve the issue. Most of the time you find out it was a miscommunication or the perception was unfounded. These are the easiest to resolve. Felt Conflict and Real Conflict are tougher because one (felt) deals with feelings and the other (real) is actual observable conflict. Feelings are one of the toughest things to overcome especially when anger, bitterness or jealousy are involved. Sheriff Nash's segment on the 5 attitudes (Independent, Wounded, Bitter, Rebellious and Unrestored) was very enlightening. "knowing is half the battle" (GI-Joe). I found it interesting when Sheriff Nash said these individuals infect others and that they seek each other out (create clicks). I thought of my own organization and could immediately see these individuals as I associated them with each of the attitudes and how they have negatively influenced the other staff they work with. Addressing these issues can be a full time job. Leaders can't wait to remediate the problem through formal sanctions. Most officers who fall into one of the 5 attitudes know exactly how far they can push something before they cross the line and get in formal trouble. Character/ ethics based restoration is about the only way to address the situation. that said, never forget the importance of self assessment to first ensure that leader not the one with the attitude problem.

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      Maja Donohue

      You have a very good point when you said that addressing bad attitudes can be a full-time job. I also think that once the leader starts addressing negative attitudes consistently, things will either get better with time, or these negative spirits will learn to watch their attitude around people who hold them accountable. Imagine if multiple leaders banded together to work on the same problem! And you are absolutely right, we need to watch our own attitudes and assess how we can make things better as well.

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    Eduardo Palomares

    Sheriff Nash's examples of the 5 attitudes that lead to conflict were spot on. These different types of attitudes start because of internal conflict. I really don't contribute these attitudes to the demands of the job. Unfortunately the 3 different types of conflict can turn a good member into the unrestorable individual. I believe that as leaders we need to spend more time identifying and preventing conflict. When we are involved in managing conflict its already too late. It is important that we as leaders understand our own feelings about conflict and recognize that our words and actions can trigger one of the 3 different types of conflict including perceived, felt and real. It has been my experience that the perceived and felt conflicts often originates during our roll-call. There are times certain topics need to addressed and discussed in order to improve our operations. As general practice I speak with the officers about the briefing topic and ask for their opinion afterwards. Interesting enough some officers perceived and felt they were the ones that did something wrong and resented what I said. This was my opportunity to clarify and prevent any type of conflict before it became a problem. I learned this technique from a great mentor who made this a common practice and talked his people individually about briefing topics.

    The five attitudes that lead to internal conflict are tied together and could progress rapidly. In my previous department, the internal conflicts between line officers and sergeants made it very difficult to work there. Sadly, the command staff leaders never paid attention to the issues that were brought to their attention by the officers. Sergeants excessively used coercive power and abused their authority which led to the "us" vs "them" mentality and no forgiveness or restoration would ever take place. The majority of people in this organization with attitudes that led to conflict were in positions of power. They avoided conflict rather than addressing it. After this lecture I will make sure to use some of the tips for dealing with conflict. I will assist those employees that have not reached the unrestorable phase to fix their attitudes and help them use emotional intelligence to deal with conflict.

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    Jarvis Mayfield

    so many times I've seen a supervisor cause a conflict between workers. I think if the supervisors would used tips to manage conflict like defusing, staying neutral and not use powerful words like shouldn't have most conflicts would be minimal.

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    Ryan Manguson

    This was an interesting module on conflict management. I, as a law enforcement professional, was not shocked to hear that the highest amount of stress comes form internal conflict within an agency. As some is actual conflict and some is perceived conflict that the officer is putting on themselves that may not be actual conflict other than in there own mind. Of course this causes undo stress. It easy to see the "Bitter Sprits" in an agency as they love to commiserate together and air all of the problems that they see. You know they are part of the bitter club because all they want to do is air problems and not provide any workable solutions or put them into action. Dealing with conflict within an agency is important. If conflict is allowed to fester without being addressed it will have negative impacts.

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      Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

      I agree Ryan, it can be evident when the bitter club starts to commiserate. Especially with our agency where we have some many new, young, and impressionable officers it’s important that the bitterness be addressed. Our job is hard enough, it’s important that we grow and develop these officers into positive LEOs

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    Sergeant Chad Blanchette

    Sheriff Nash did a good job with this module. It was interesting to hear him speak about the different attitudes that lead to conflict. Anyone with any time on the job has seen most, if not all of these spirits internally and externally. His solution to dealing with the conflict did seem a bit hokie, but when I gave it some time to sink in, it made sense.

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    Maja Donohue

    I was not surprised to hear that internal conflicts are the primary source of stress in this profession, but I’ve never been able to figure out why this is the case. This module really put things into perspective for me and truly goes to show that knowledge is power. You can’t attempt to address something if you are unable to identify and understand it first. I also appreciated the discussion on attitudes that lead to conflict. There were several Aha! moments as I watched the lecture and needless to say, I feel like my eyes have been opened.
    As leaders, we need to pay attention to these attitudes and intervene promptly. If we don’t do that, we allow the independent, wounded, bitter, rebellious and unrestored spirits to drag everyone else down with them. Failing to do our job makes us complicit and enables them to continue acting this way. Although it seems like a daunting task to start addressing negative attitudes, Sheriff Nash made me feel like there is hope that we can make a positive impact on some of these people. Even a small chance that someone may be able to turn things around is worth the effort. I really appreciated the information in this module and feel that I am better prepared to identify conflicts in the future. I also hope that I can learn to manage conflict more effectively.

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      Sergeant Paul Gronholz

      I agree. If we can get both sides to admit to and ask forgiveness for even the smallest portion, the conflict will generally be resolved. That was a very interesting portion of the module.

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    Sgt. Ryan Lodermeier

    I was not surprised at all to see that internal conflict was the primary stressor in a LEOs career. I appreciate how this module broke down the three types of conflict. I am sure it would be almost impossible to know but I would be curious to know what the average make up each conflict type is amongst LEOs, specifically when it comes to perceived conflicts. How much of our time is spent worrying about conflict that doesn’t even exist?
    Going further I would venture to guess that we spend more time stressing about real and felt conflict as appose to addressing it with the other person. I appreciate Mackler’s tips on managing this conflict but I couldn’t help but think that there are some people whom have conflict that just are not open to discussing it. For these few people perhaps we just accept that we tried to resolve the issue and move on from there.

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    Robert Schei

    I was not surprised to learn that most law enforcement stress comes from internal sources. We are all type A personality people who have strong opinions, strong beliefs and want it our way. So when that is challenged by anyone in our group who we typically agree with we become upset and carry that issue forward throughout our careers. I also liked conflict maxim number 2 that states that leaders understand that conflicts are rarely resolved so they must be managed. Anybody know what the percentage of law enforcement professionals that take ownership and resolve conflict with their peers is? I'm just going to guess that it is not very high, when we disagree with others strongly we tend to avoid them not work with them to resolve the concern.

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      Andy Opperman

      Very true Robert. I would not only agree that when we disagree with others strongly, we tend to avoid them, but I also think many officers spread that anger or disagreement to their co-workers instead of resolving it with the person involved. At times it's almost as though we are back in high school trying to deal with the rumor mill, as officers get older instead of rumor's it just turns into avoidance. Departments need to spend more money on training and communication at an internal level.

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    Christopher Lowrie

    The section by Lauren Mackler was very informative. Leaders need to do a reality check and not take things at face value. Keep a neutral tone and don't cause people to feel attacked. I definitely need to use more "I" sentences to help manage conflict effectively. I also need to stop telling people they should do something. I need to rephrase it with softer language.

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      Cynthia Estrup

      Christopher,

      "I" statements are great and very difficult to fire back on when you use them as "I feel" versus, "You made me feel." I also think there is a lot to be said about talking to a person face to face so the "softer" body language can be seen and heard. So often, we have become so dependent on texting and email to communicate, and so much of the communication is lost via this method.

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        Jacqueline Dahms

        I think body language has a lot to do with communication and so much is lost without that face to face. And I agree with using "I" statements. I can think back to my last big internal conflict and I did use "you" when really it was about how "I" felt.

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    Sergeant Durand Ackman

    Internal conflicts are absolutely the primary source of stress. We expect the "clients" (detainees, or general public) to act in a way that we need to intervene. If we were not needed to intervene, we wouldn't be dealing with them so we mentally prepare and know there will be conflict. It is the internal conflict we didn't know or expect. Most in this profession as set in their way and have their own specific style. Most of these styles fall within policy and procedure but nobody is exactly the same. So when we see others doing it differently some automatically assume different means wrong. I liked the part talking about the 5 attitudes leading to conflict. I found myself assigning names to each of those... I really enjoyed the small section by Laren Mackler. Her first suggestion of not making assumptions is spot on. Far to often people get part of the facts and start assuming the rest. This ultimately leads to conflict.

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    Sergeant Paul Gronholz

    I thought the conflict management strategy outlined at the end of the module was interesting. If you can agree with both sides of an argument to agree to take even the smallest percentage of blame for a conflict. Most people understand that there are two sides to every conflict and if we can get them to acknowledge that we can move forward. Then, convincing them to ask forgiveness for that small part and granting forgiveness to the other side of the argument for their part. Amazing that if you can get both sides to agree to take responsibility for even the smallest portion, the other 80% will just evaporate.

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      Sergeant Kelly Lee

      Just read your post Paul and it's funny because I pretty much said the same thing. We have both seen problems inside our own departments that have festered for years and no one has taken the lead to try and fix. One would think if we were to use Sheriff Nash's strategy and both sides were to take "10%" and the other 80% goes by the wayside that we could clear up a lot of issues.

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    Lieutenant Jennifer Hodgman

    This module presented us with valuable tools for conflict management. I found it interesting that the majority of law enforcement stress is caused internally. The three-question strategy for managing conflict was simple, straightforward and something I will work towards implementing in my leadership journey.

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    Cynthia Estrup

    As I look back at my 20+ year career in law enforcement and reflect on the hardest times, I continue to go back to the internal conflicts within the departments. Going to traumatic scenes, or high stress incidents, is a known factor of the job. Don't get me wrong, that stuff stays with you, but when you take that oath on day one, you know you are going to have those experiences. I think the unknown is the internal struggle within the department. These struggles can be peer to peer, mentor to mentee, or supervisor to subordinate. Honestly and internal struggle can be policy related as well. When we enter the field we have this perception of family and comradery. However, when that support is not found, and quite the opposite, when it feels like one is being attacked from the inside, that is a betrayal that is very difficult to overcome.

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    Samantha Reps

    The video by Lauren Mackler was eye opening, people are driven by running assumptions instead of doing reality checks. Far to often we catch ourselves in these situations and having a conversation could clear up so much but we don't simply do it. The tips when the conversation happens are great tools and some that I will use when needed.
    I wasn't surprised to hear that the number one stressor for law enforcement is internal relationships. I think we have all heard it, my job is easy, dealing with my peers is the hardest part.

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      Sergeant Matt Wieland

      I liked that video from Mackler as well. The idea of a reality check is important, along with staying calm and using Emotional Intelligence. So much of conflict is not maintaining a level head to be able to see things clearly to avoid it being blown out of proportion.

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      Sgt. Shawn Wilson

      Agree. If we just have a conversation with another individual instead of creating assumptions, then many conflicts would never actually be conflicts. Rumor and assumption created conflict are highly detrimental to morale within an organization.

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    Sheriff Nash made a lot of interesting points. What really stuck out to me was letting go of perceived rights. I have the power to relinquish what I believe to be mine in order to better relationships and avoid unnecessary conflicts.

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      I agree. As cops we often have the mindset of "it's my way or the highway". This need to do things our way can cause so many problems, not just at work but, in our personal lives too.

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    Sergeant Matt Wieland

    The thing that resonated the most with me in this module is the idea that most of the stress in law enforcement comes from internal relationships rather than external events. I think back on my own career, and its striking to realize the truth in this. External stresses and conflicts with citizens happen, but are often quickly forgotten as we move on to the next calls or incidents. The stresses from relationships within our organizations seem much more complicated and longer lasting. I think this training would be eye opening for all LE officers to see, not just supervisors. It seems we are focusing on conflict management skills/training with citizens/suspects, but we ignore conflict management with those we interact with inside of our agencies. As supervisors, it is important to practice and share and develop conflict management skills within our staff which will build a more cohesive and better functioning team.

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    Sergeant Kelly Lee

    After reading many of my classmates posts, I am completely agree with them in saying it is 100% the truth that MOST of our stress comes from internal conflict. I look at myself in our department and see myself struggling at times to get along with everyone. Most of the that stress comes from perceived competition or past differences that have never been resolved. I think the advice/strategy that Sheriff Nash offers is a unique way to resolve the problem and let the other "80%" get absorbed in forgiveness. The next time I have an issue present itself I will be sure to try this out.

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    Jacqueline Dahms

    Sheriff Nash is right on point when it comes to internal conflicts. I have personally dealt with this between peers and now subordinates. The common term we call it is “high school mentality”. It is very frustrating to try and “fix” the issues and perhaps that is the problem. We can’t fix the conflicts, only manage them. I like the simplicity of the 5 attitudes leading to conflicts and the solutions to managing these attitudes with opposing character response. It will be interesting the first time I try his conflict management strategy.

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      Major Willie Stewart

      Jacqueline, you are so correct, we also call it "high school drama". Sometimes it's unnecessary drama that should have been resolved years ago.

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      I think your point about managing the issues is exactly right. I feel like I am a person that is always wanting to fix issues, when in reality I just need to manage them. We also have certain people within our agency that have the "high school mentality" and it is extremely challenging. As Sheriff Nash was going through each of the 5 attitudes I was able to think of at least one person that fit each one, and one person in particular fit 3 of them. Being able to manage individuals that continue to impact the department negatively is something that needs to be addressed immediately. Going through each of those types of attitudes shows that if it isn't fixed, it will most likely only get worse.

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    Andy Opperman

    Sheriff Nash was spot on with the 4 Maxims he described related to conflict management. As a supervisor Maxim 1 makes a lot of sense to me. Law enforcement is trained a high level to deal with critical incidents, we are even given resources for after the critical incident, but we really struggle sometimes with inner turmoil of the department. I think that Maxim 4 really struck a note with me. Law enforcement officers seem to really have a hard time forgiving their own people for equity issues in their career. To work together we need to learn from those issues in the workplace and forgive. I also believe that many of the issues that pop up with in a department are perceived or felt, then never really resolved. It makes you wonder how many times in your career the conflict was real. I am going to try the conflict management strategy Sheriff Nash described. It really allows officers or supervisors involved to take some responsibility while saving face.

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      I thought his idea of taking 10% ownership was a very unique way to approach the conflict. What's funny here is we're talking about adult men and women who carry firearms, drive fast cars, make life-changing decisions as a matter of routine and we have to talk to them like they are in junior high school. If it works, great though. I see this in my own agency, I just have never been able to understand the drama that some bring and who refuse to take any ownership.

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    Major Willie Stewart

    It was amazing to hear what the citizens think are the stressors within the law enforcement community and to actually find out that it is within the agencies. The five internal attitudes was so spot on. As the overseer of our Peer Support team, we deal with some of these on a constant basis. I will definitely pass the conflict management strategy onto my staff. This was definitely a great lecture.

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    Until this lesson, I honestly considered stress in a law enforcement career to come from the actual calls and situations that we are put in with the public. However, this lesson made me realize that most of the stress that I have comes from people that I work with. One person that I work with is notorious for being passive aggressive and often sends e-mails that are either very vague and harsh, or are making an issue out of nothing that is major at all. This person doesn't only send them to a few people. They also send them to management and it is often chalked to be "he is in one of his moods". This person is extremely challenging to work with and often impacts the moral and attitudes of other negatively. Most avoid confronting him about it and just wait until he is in a "better mood".

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      As Colin Powell would say, "never walk past a mistake." In other words, that behavior only reinforces the behavior, in my opinion. As the module here indicated, why is this person doing this? There has to be something more. Has this person landed in the bitter spirit category? Maybe it's time to put these lessons to work in our organizations. Thanks for sharing, I feel your pain here.

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    I have to agree, most of my stress does come from internal issues. When I was not a supervisor, the most stress came from the job. I was never one to cross swords with my supervisors. We all have a job and a role. Some people don't like to be followers and put up roadblocks to success every chance they can.

    Shifting over to the attitudes leading to conflict, I could see many of my experiences in this part of the module. It also helped me to start to understand some who have landed in the rebellious spirit. As the instructor pointed out, "get rid of them" isn't the easiest thing to do in our business. Unions stand in the way too often and keep bad eggs employed. It was interesting to see how he laid out the progression of those types of employees. I see the bitter spirit example through like-minded employees banding together and continually try to bring the organization down.

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      Timothy Sandlin

      Great point. I have always felt more stress from the internal relationships and situations than that of the external stressors. It is something that I have always thought we should work to manage and control better. It works against us if we can not manage the internal relationships in a positive way.

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    Brad Strouf

    Strong personalities and high levels of authority as law enforcement officers creates an environment that is ripe for this type of internal strife and conflict. Having it broken down along with strategies to manage, if not completely resolve the conflict, was eye opening and welcome.

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    Sgt. Shawn Wilson

    This module if implemented within a department would cut down significantly on rumors and perceived conflict that drives many of the organizational issues that occur. Having leadership that is willing to confront the conflicts in a positive manner will lead to greater organizational success.
    Breaking down the 4 maxims with an understanding of the different types of conflict combined with a solution-based approach to resolving conflict. I have observed many managers over the year allowing “unrestored spirits” to infect a shift and decrease morale and shift efficiency. As leaders I believe we have a duty to deal with these conflicts although they may involve difficult decisions.

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      I like your view on this! I was in a division once that thrived on department gossip and shenanigans. The division commander finally grew tired of it and posted a big sign that said "Drama Free Zone". He allowed the comradery related shenanigans, but put a halt to the rest of the drama. It stung at first, but quickly had a positive affect. He was also good about assigning projects to people with conflicts that needed to be completed together. Most of the time that helped resolve their issues.

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      Nicole Oakes

      I agree with you. But all too often the supervisors are the ones with the Bitter Spirit, Wounded Spirit, or Rebellious Spirit. As in all successful organizations you would need a leader that is able to use the Conflict Managment Strategy effectively starting at the top of the agency and working down.

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    I thought Sheriff Nash was a great speaker and did a very good job explaining the concepts of conflict management. Understanding five of the many attitudes that lead to conflict helps relate to a lot of issues we see. I know I was already assigning names to each attitude when Nash made the comment about pigeon holing co-workers to a particular attitude. I know I hate dealing with internal agency conflict and it seems the most common way of handling the majority of conflicts is to let them work themselves out. This attitudes described made it obvious that there are a lot of things we assumed had fixed themselves, but realistically have not. I know it made me scratch my head about the decisions I've made with the mindset, "their adults, let them work it out."

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    Nicole Oakes

    I liked that we were able to take a conflict management. I would have really appreciated if they had gone into more detail with the explanation of it as it relates to us as individuals. I did not completely understand what the graph was explaining. I did appreciate Sheriff’s Nash’s openness in dealing with the Unrestored Spirit. All too often we, in law enforcement, want to continue to fix things and people. I appreciated that Sheriff Nash said if at all possible get rid of this type of person.

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    It doesn't surprise me that internal conflict causes the most stress. I've had issues with supervisors or coworkers before and I remember feeling the stress rise as I pulled into the parking lot on my way to the office. I like Sheriff Nash's strategy for getting both sides to accept some blame and asking for forgiveness. I also totally agree with the statement that not all conflict can be resolved but it must be managed.

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      Jed,
      From recently taking over an administrative role and dealing with the internal conflicts. I never had thought the added stress that comes along with my new position.

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      Sergeant Michael Prachel

      I agree, Jed. No big surprise that internal relationships in law enforcement is the origin of most of our stress. Most officers, especially in my agency, can do their job very well and are able to a high stress incident. Training kicks in and we rely on the muscle memory to get us through. Like Sheriff Nash said, it’s the internal (typically non-sense) conflicts that amps us up and gets the stress going.

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    Having recently been promoted to an administrative role in our office. I have found that the internal conflict we have only comes from just a few of our veteran deputies. The majority of the individuals are from what the module described as an Independent Spirit. These individuals that we have to deal with are self centered, they push blame off onto others. Some of these individuals are almost 20 year veterans that thrive on trying to pass the poison onto others. I find it extremely hard to remain "meek" during these times. Having learning more about not letting other dictate our responses was a huge take away for me.

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      Matthew Menard

      I agree - I feel that if we as leaders find those employees who have the unrestored spirits we need to work to get rid of them for the betterment of the entire organization. Even those who are bitter or rebellious can be damaging and create a toxic culture.

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    Timothy Sandlin

    Absolutely enjoyed this module presented by Sheriff Nash. The information on the five attitudes leading to conflict: independent spirit; wounded spirit; bitter spirit; rebellious spirit; and the unrestored spirit helped me put into context what I have experienced at times not only with others, but even myself. The focus on character based approach to dealing with it ties effectively in with the other topics of leadership that we have discussed. And I find the practical conflict management strategy to be simple and effective way to restore a relationship for a more positive path foward.

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      Ronald Smith

      Timothy
      This was a new way to describe conflict and Sheriff Nash presented it with energy. I think I can try this around here because I see lots of conflict happening within the department. Some of it may just be millennials being told to do something but there is real conflict too.

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    Gregory Hutchins

    As the lesson progressed, a common theme that resonated was the offense. Through numerous training opportunities, the topic of offense and its effect on individuals is compelling. As seen within the lesson, at the center of managing conflict is self-awareness that leads to ownership. Until one can honestly evaluate their part in the conflict, there is no way to resolve it. This topic can go back to the Bible, and it is in the teachings of Gandhi, who spoke about the power of words. Words are often the source of our conflict or reasons to be offended. How we take action (words) creates emotions, and emotions feed beliefs. Beliefs lead to actions that become one's habits. One's habits become one's values, and this ultimately becomes one's destiny. At any point in this process, how one chooses to view the situation will become one's reaction. Nash illustrated this theme through how people fall into one of the five attitudes. By that term alone, one can see the need for self-awareness and regulation, attitude.

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    Ronald Smith

    From my perch, I can see and hear the first three Conflict Maxims, from the beginning of my career I have seen and even been apart of not wanting certain officers or supervisors anywhere near me while in the field. The result of those conversations, we will call them, was distrust. Nobody forgets the hurtful things people say or do. If we could be the force we are when one of us gets hurt, the comradery and feeling of a family all the time law enforcement would be a great gig. Officers and supervisors not doing what they say they are going to do, not living up to expectations, does not just exist in the officer ranks I see it every time one of our analytical staff members sits on a decision or task delaying progress. Other staff members will bypass the individual for fear of the document or project being held up. When the staff members get to this level of real conflict I see retirement paperwork appearing on desks.

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    Matthew Menard

    I enjoyed to conflict resolution example that Nash presented at the end of the lecture. I believe his idea of asking each person involved in the conflict to accept some responsibility, even if only a small percentage, provides all involved the ability to save face. Time and time again I see conflict between people continue simply because neither party wants to admit fault. I see myself using this technique next time I am put in a position to mediate some short of conflict.

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    Marshall Carmouche

    This model was beneficial to me professionally speaking. Sheriff Nash talked about and discussed some great points for me to use in my division. Conflict resolution is a frequent challenge and task for me. The vast majority of time the conflict is perceived or caused from a rumor. Unfortunately, rumors in the workplace is what brings about the internal conflicts discussed in the module. I tell the people I work with that we should be building each other up instead of breaking each other down. The 5 attitudes leading to conflict was interesting too. In the workplace we deal with all types of personalities and attitudes. I thought that i was always resolving conflicts with personnel. After this module I understand now that, perhaps indeed I was doing more conflict management.

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    Sergeant Michael Prachel

    “Conflict Management” is an interesting topic when it comes to law enforcement, because it’s something that we are always involved in – externally or internally. This module was fascinating and got my attention – partially due to Sheriff Nash’s personality and character. In his “4 Conflict Maxims,” he talked about how conflicts are rarely resolved, so they have to be managed. I can agree with this, especially in law enforcement. Despite having conflict, officers still have to work together; thus, they need to set aside and manage conflict, so they can be productive in the field. If they can “shelf” their conflict or come to some sort of mutual agreement, this conflict can be minimized and managed.

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    Travis Linskens

    This lesson does a great job expressing the importance of being aware of conflict within your agency. It’s interesting that whether it is perceived, felt or real, most conflict is internally driven. It leaves a lot to be analyzed with what leadership can do to reduce stress in the workplace. What I’ve found to work well is not immediately responding to conflict but being aware of it and processing it to its entirety before getting involved. A lot of times, waiting a day or two before addressing an area of conflict allows for cooler heads to prevail.